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Veganism for weight loss

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  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Posts: 20,809Member Member Posts: 20,809Member Member
    https://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/the-china-study-revisited/

    The china study is pretty bad. And that you rebounded from it even though "they" say you won't because it's so good and *kitten* should tell you how seriously you should take "them".

    Thanks for the link. I'm just trying to listen to my body and I'm still concerned about B12 deficiency, so I'm not back to being 100% plant based.

    B12 supplementation is pretty easy -- lots of non-vegans also supplement B12.
  • ForgetfoodDrinkteaForgetfoodDrinktea Posts: 4Member Member Posts: 4Member Member
    I recently became an vegan, as did my boyfriend. My boyfriend actually gained muscle from making the switch from animal protein to plant protein. Why? I'm not sure. He still eats the same calories. Just better nutrition. I, on the other hand, am a fat vegan. I am losing weight now that I am vegan. I have not done a lot of exercise lately so I cannot comment on my muscle and it's strengths. I do lose more inches and fewer pounds more quickly as a vegan in comparison to when I was dieting and omnivorous. I very much believe it has to do with the limitations as a vegan. It's hard to eat junk. I usually stick to chick peas and mixed veggies, nori, rice, and occasional fruits.
  • lemurcat12lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886Member Member Posts: 30,886Member Member
    I think it's best to call health- or diet-motivated no animal products diets "plant-based," as to me vegan means an ethical position.
  • erialcelyoberialcelyob Posts: 344Member Member Posts: 344Member Member
    There is no reason they shouldn't
  • BecomingBaneBecomingBane Posts: 3,648Member Member Posts: 3,648Member Member
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    I think it's best to call health- or diet-motivated no animal products diets "plant-based," as to me vegan means an ethical position.

    I agree with this statement, but then again, I'm biased. So, whatevs.
  • salembambisalembambi Posts: 5,654Member Member Posts: 5,654Member Member
    tofu haters are the best cause then i get all the tofu and they can go be wrong somewhere else ;)
  • BecomingBaneBecomingBane Posts: 3,648Member Member Posts: 3,648Member Member
    salembambi wrote: »
    tofu haters are the best cause then i get all the tofu and they can go be wrong somewhere else ;)

    Arm wrestle you for it.
  • kk_inprogresskk_inprogress Posts: 3,077Member Member Posts: 3,077Member Member
    salembambi wrote: »
    tofu haters are the best cause then i get all the tofu and they can go be wrong somewhere else ;)

    You can have all of my tofu, from now until I die. ;)
  • rankinsectrankinsect Posts: 2,238Member, Premium Member Posts: 2,238Member, Premium Member
    zcb94 wrote: »
    Interested? Sure, I'd try it once! Maybe not right now, but if it ever became necessary for health, count me in!

    It's not necessary for health. With modern vitamin supplements, it need not be actively harmful to health, but any restricted diet requires extra care to meet nutrition needs versus a more varied diet.

    You can be very healthy on either a vegan or a non-vegan diet, and conversely you can be very unhealthy on a vegan or a non-vegan diet.
  • zcb94zcb94 Posts: 4,191Member Member Posts: 4,191Member Member
    rankinsect wrote: »
    zcb94 wrote: »
    Interested? Sure, I'd try it once! Maybe not right now, but if it ever became necessary for health, count me in!

    It's not necessary for health. With modern vitamin supplements, it need not be actively harmful to health, but any restricted diet requires extra care to meet nutrition needs versus a more varied diet.

    You can be very healthy on either a vegan or a non-vegan diet, and conversely you can be very unhealthy on a vegan or a non-vegan diet.
    True, but sometimes one's doctor can decide that such a radical lifestyle is necessary. After all, one does not usually go gluten-free without prescription to do so.
  • BecomingBaneBecomingBane Posts: 3,648Member Member Posts: 3,648Member Member
    zcb94 wrote: »
    rankinsect wrote: »
    zcb94 wrote: »
    Interested? Sure, I'd try it once! Maybe not right now, but if it ever became necessary for health, count me in!

    It's not necessary for health. With modern vitamin supplements, it need not be actively harmful to health, but any restricted diet requires extra care to meet nutrition needs versus a more varied diet.

    You can be very healthy on either a vegan or a non-vegan diet, and conversely you can be very unhealthy on a vegan or a non-vegan diet.
    True, but sometimes one's doctor can decide that such a radical lifestyle is necessary. After all, one does not usually go gluten-free without prescription to do so.

    I'll not disagree with you on the first point. Doctors can and will prescribe specific diets for health purposes... keto for brain disorders is a common example.

    But, to argue your second point, the vast majority of the people that I've met who've gone gluten free did not receive any kind of diagnosis but simply read a book, or an article and decided to do it. I have a reasonable sized friend group who are gluten free and only two of those people eat gluten free for specifically prescribed reasons... one is chrohn's disease and the other an as of yet undiagnosed auto-immune disorder.
  • psuLemonpsuLemon Posts: 35,323Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium MFP Moderator Posts: 35,323Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium MFP Moderator
    zcb94 wrote: »
    rankinsect wrote: »
    zcb94 wrote: »
    Interested? Sure, I'd try it once! Maybe not right now, but if it ever became necessary for health, count me in!

    It's not necessary for health. With modern vitamin supplements, it need not be actively harmful to health, but any restricted diet requires extra care to meet nutrition needs versus a more varied diet.

    You can be very healthy on either a vegan or a non-vegan diet, and conversely you can be very unhealthy on a vegan or a non-vegan diet.
    True, but sometimes one's doctor can decide that such a radical lifestyle is necessary. After all, one does not usually go gluten-free without prescription to do so.

    I'll not disagree with you on the first point. Doctors can and will prescribe specific diets for health purposes... keto for brain disorders is a common example.

    But, to argue your second point, the vast majority of the people that I've met who've gone gluten free did not receive any kind of diagnosis but simply read a book, or an article and decided to do it. I have a reasonable sized friend group who are gluten free and only two of those people eat gluten free for specifically prescribed reasons... one is chrohn's disease and the other an as of yet undiagnosed auto-immune disorder.

    I would agree on the gluten free issue. I knew several people who thought a variety of gluten items makes you fat. But i know 2 people who have to do it for legitimate reasons, 1. My wifes friend with celiac and 2. My wife with POTS.

    What most people dont realize is many gluten free versions have mlre calories than the non gluten version.
  • zcb94zcb94 Posts: 4,191Member Member Posts: 4,191Member Member
    @BecomingBane, true. As I mentioned, that's not usually the case, though. As you no doubt know, one should ideally ask the doctor before pursuing a major diet/exercise program. I meant to use GF life as an example of health decisions that are best made with physician guidance. Low-sodium living is another such example. More power to those who can undertake such a radical change alone, though!
    I, for one, would be content to try excluding animal products from my life only if my healthcare team asked me to do so.
    I hope your friend receives a more detailed answer/diagnosis soon! :)
    edited February 2016
  • psuLemonpsuLemon Posts: 35,323Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium MFP Moderator Posts: 35,323Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium MFP Moderator
    zcb94 wrote: »
    @BecomingBane, true. As I mentioned, that's not usually the case, though. As you no doubt know, one should ideally ask the doctor before pursuing a major diet/exercise program. I meant to use GF life as an example of health decisions that are best made with physician guidance. Low-sodium living is another such example. More power to those who can undertake such a radical change alone, though!

    Honestly, most doctors have little or no knowledge of nutrtion unless its their specialty.

    Edit: in fact, i have had discussuons with my wifes electrophysiologist and even he was surprised about my knowledge and i was making recommendations to him on the best supplements for electrolytes to help his patients.

    Also, my friend is a University of Penn trained pedantic cardiologist and she knows nothing about nutrition. She has specialists for that.
    edited February 2016
  • BecomingBaneBecomingBane Posts: 3,648Member Member Posts: 3,648Member Member
    zcb94 wrote: »
    @BecomingBane, true. As I mentioned, that's not usually the case, though. As you no doubt know, one should ideally ask the doctor before pursuing a major diet/exercise program. I meant to use GF life as an example of health decisions that are best made with physician guidance. Low-sodium living is another such example. More power to those who can undertake such a radical change alone, though!

    The bolded above is a very insightful statement, but the vast majority of people I talk to via IRL conversation, on this board or others that I frequent, don't tend to do that. Very few people I know consult their doctor with dietary nutrition or fitness changes that occur in their life, even if they are regularly seeing the doctor for other reasons.

    While it would be ideal if that occurred prior to any lifestyle change, fitness plan, etc... it very rarely seems to.

    I don't think your points are invalid, and I'm not really trying to argue with you, but it appears from my perspective that you are confusing what you do personally and what the correct thing is to do, with what actually occurs for the majority of individuals. The two can be drastically different, especially as locales change as their are many environmental factors that prevent many from going to the doctor for varying reasons not limited to beliefs, budgetary concerns, disbelief in modern medicine (or beliefs in other medicine systems such as traditional Indian or Chinese medicine, ignorance of health concerns in general, fear of doctors, etc.

    *Edited for spelling
    edited February 2016
  • lemurcat12lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886Member Member Posts: 30,886Member Member
    psuLemon wrote: »
    zcb94 wrote: »
    rankinsect wrote: »
    zcb94 wrote: »
    Interested? Sure, I'd try it once! Maybe not right now, but if it ever became necessary for health, count me in!

    It's not necessary for health. With modern vitamin supplements, it need not be actively harmful to health, but any restricted diet requires extra care to meet nutrition needs versus a more varied diet.

    You can be very healthy on either a vegan or a non-vegan diet, and conversely you can be very unhealthy on a vegan or a non-vegan diet.
    True, but sometimes one's doctor can decide that such a radical lifestyle is necessary. After all, one does not usually go gluten-free without prescription to do so.

    I'll not disagree with you on the first point. Doctors can and will prescribe specific diets for health purposes... keto for brain disorders is a common example.

    But, to argue your second point, the vast majority of the people that I've met who've gone gluten free did not receive any kind of diagnosis but simply read a book, or an article and decided to do it. I have a reasonable sized friend group who are gluten free and only two of those people eat gluten free for specifically prescribed reasons... one is chrohn's disease and the other an as of yet undiagnosed auto-immune disorder.

    I would agree on the gluten free issue. I knew several people who thought a variety of gluten items makes you fat. But i know 2 people who have to do it for legitimate reasons, 1. My wifes friend with celiac and 2. My wife with POTS.

    What most people dont realize is many gluten free versions have mlre calories than the non gluten version.

    Me too. I know people who are celiac, so no question it is sometimes necessary or beneficial. I know many others who have just decided to try gluten-free or diagnosed themselves as gluten-sensitive with no dr involvement, because it's currently a thing and I live in a subculture that is into faddish diets.

    My sister decided last year that gluten was causing some skin issue she had and was telling me how she thought she had to go gluten free while making herself dinner (pasta). I couldn't help but say kind of snidely "you know pasta has gluten, right?" She said "I didn't mean I was going to do it now." She has since dropped the idea and decided her issue is wool (clothing) and feta cheese.
  • senecarrsenecarr Posts: 5,377Member Member Posts: 5,377Member Member
    I recently became an vegan, as did my boyfriend. My boyfriend actually gained muscle from making the switch from animal protein to plant protein. Why? I'm not sure. He still eats the same calories. Just better nutrition. I, on the other hand, am a fat vegan. I am losing weight now that I am vegan. I have not done a lot of exercise lately so I cannot comment on my muscle and it's strengths. I do lose more inches and fewer pounds more quickly as a vegan in comparison to when I was dieting and omnivorous. I very much believe it has to do with the limitations as a vegan. It's hard to eat junk. I usually stick to chick peas and mixed veggies, nori, rice, and occasional fruits.

    He gained muscle on the same calories, and the same exercise? How did you determine he gained muscle?
  • psuLemonpsuLemon Posts: 35,323Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium MFP Moderator Posts: 35,323Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium MFP Moderator
    Its not a fad diet for everyone. I get digestive issues when I eat gluten even though ive been tested negative for celiac. I dont replace gluten foods with other gluten free processed foods because those can give me issues as well.
    If you havent been in the shoes of the people who think they are gluten sensitive then you dont really know what it feels like. It seems unnecessary and wrong to judge them, no?
    Also gluten is not a nutritional necessity. If you quit it, you dont end up being deficient in any vitamins or lose out on anything important that your body needs. Its not that big of deal.
    I love that gluten free helps me also avoid high calorie junk food but theres other reasons nonceliacs become gf.

    In all fairness, no one particular food or food group is nutritionally required. It's why there are so many elimination type diets.
  • cbelc2cbelc2 Posts: 754Member Member Posts: 754Member Member
    You can be very healthy on a vegan diet. Pay attention to your nutrients.
  • kensrebootkensreboot Posts: 17Member Member Posts: 17Member Member
    It's possible,but the vegans I've seen look frail

    Me too, especially those competing in the Iron Man triathlons. :)
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