Please stop feeding my child junk!!

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Replies

  • MommyMeggo
    MommyMeggo Posts: 1,222 Member
    Villae81 wrote: »
    Your daughter probably gonna hate eating healthy when she's grown if she's deprive from junk food all her childhood life

    Well shes not deprived- mom gives her treats occasionally. Its just that mom doesnt want anyone else to give her treats when shes asked them not to. :)
  • chunky_pinup
    chunky_pinup Posts: 758 Member
    Your child, your rules. If people you are trusting to care for your child don't follow those rules, then find someone else. You are allowed to tell someone - even family - no. My little girl has a severe dairy allergy...even the slightest amount triggers anaphylaxis...and it's in a TON of stuff...so my husband and I are very serious with no means no. Great grandma was dying to give her some chocolate pudding, but you are in charge of your childs' well being. Not others. If you don't want them feeding your kid junk, don't let them. It's really quite simple.
  • SarcasmIsMyLoveLanguage
    SarcasmIsMyLoveLanguage Posts: 2,671 Member
    Your child, your rules. If people you are trusting to care for your child don't follow those rules, then find someone else. You are allowed to tell someone - even family - no. My little girl has a severe dairy allergy...even the slightest amount triggers anaphylaxis...and it's in a TON of stuff...so my husband and I are very serious with no means no. Great grandma was dying to give her some chocolate pudding, but you are in charge of your childs' well being. Not others. If you don't want them feeding your kid junk, don't let them. It's really quite simple.

    Not the same situation IMHO
  • AlabasterVerve
    AlabasterVerve Posts: 3,171 Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    Villae81 wrote: »
    Your daughter probably gonna hate eating healthy when she's grown if she's deprive from junk food all her childhood life

    My n=1 reflects the opposite - I was "deprived" of junk as a child and it made it really easy for me to return to healthy eating. I believe it positively affected my taste buds as well.

    That was my experience as well. The reasons might be different (we didn't have the money to eat junk food regularly) but growing up eating proper meals made it easy and familiar to go back to eating a healthful diet. Being "forced" to eat healthy made me appreciate and enjoy those foods, not hate them.

    Good for you @mell4now for limiting the junk - your daughter will appreciate it when she's older.
  • positivepowers
    positivepowers Posts: 902 Member
    I think you may be looking at this wrong. Your daughter will spend a lifetime exposed to junk food. This is a perfect opportunity to teach her the word "no" and how she can apply it to her own life. If you don't start now (experience speaking here, I've raised three to adulthood) by the time she gets into school she will eat the worst crap ever. Some schools even have vending machines. Even if you homeschool like I did, she will be exposed because you can't control her entire environment every moment of every day. You don't say how old she is, but starting about age two her favorite word is (or was) "NO!" anyway. Good time to begin teaching her WHEN to say no and why!
  • MommyMeggo
    MommyMeggo Posts: 1,222 Member
    edited April 2016
    Aside from being the enforcer of tough consequences, "letting go" is one of the hardest parts of parenting. Especially when it stems from fear regarding your child's well-being....and what parent doesnt have that?

    But over-bearing controlling parents make it tough on their little ones though. All we want to do is our best- and do right by them.

    Im 32 and still have to put my hand up and remind my sweet mother that Im an adult.
    (She gives them Icees and a donut after school on occasion- totally ruins their appetite when she does that- so that night they eat plain cheerios/milk for dinner and go to bed happy- as do I.)
    I pick my battles-and with 3 kids there are plenty to choose from!
  • Mentali
    Mentali Posts: 352 Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    Villae81 wrote: »
    Your daughter probably gonna hate eating healthy when she's grown if she's deprive from junk food all her childhood life

    My n=1 reflects the opposite - I was "deprived" of junk as a child and it made it really easy for me to return to healthy eating. I believe it positively affected my taste buds as well.

    That was my experience as well. The reasons might be different (we didn't have the money to eat junk food regularly) but growing up eating proper meals made it easy and familiar to go back to eating a healthful diet. Being "forced" to eat healthy made me appreciate and enjoy those foods, not hate them.

    Good for you @mell4now for limiting the junk - your daughter will appreciate it when she's older.

    There's a big difference between "I ate healthy meals at home" and "I was shielded so much from treats that when every other child in my daycare program was eating an Oreo I was given a granola bar."

    You can eat a healthy diet at home, learn how to eat properly, and still have an Oreo at snacktime after school every few days.
  • perkymommy
    perkymommy Posts: 1,640 Member
    mell4now wrote: »
    Diabetes, heart attack, hypertension obesity and other diet related illnesses run in mine and my husbands family, so ever since my daughter started solid foods, I've been feeding her predominantly balanced and healthy food choices. Her diet includes lots of fresh fruits, veggies, cheeses, eggs, nuts, seeds, beans, yogurts whole grain bread/pasta/cereals I give her a mix of both lean and fatty cuts of meats because children NEED a certain percentage of animal fats in their diets. For beverages either whole milk, or home/made vegetable smoothies. She gets the occasional cookie or cracker every now and then, and we let her eat whatever she wants at birthday parties, holidays and special events. We might even go out for ice cream once every few weeks or so, but it is not an every day occurence The problem we are having is that whenever she is someone else's care or around other people despite having her own food people offer her JUNK! They know she loves to eat a banana dipped in peanut butter or a cup of yogurt with some raspberries and would intentionally give her a bag of cheese curls or a plate of cookies instead! She has a nice whole grain honey-oat cereal but has been given a commercial sugar-loaded bowl of junk. Of course after eating junk food for a day she has a bit of resistance when returning home and is offered a healthy dinner. I just don't understand why it gives people so much pleasure to feed my child junk food when she is accustomed to and LIKES her healthy eats?!? I recently interviewed a potential child care provider for when I return to work full-time and even after I just got done explaining to her that I like my daughter to eat healthy, she waved a cookie in my daughters face and asked if ok to give my daughter an Oreo along with the other kids...I thought it was a joke!! But absolutely nothing I said sunk in. I kindly said (as I pulled it out of the diaper bag) "I'd rather her have this whole grain snack bar instead"

    Any tips on how to politely and effectively suggest that certain people stop doping up my kid on the junk food, or at least limit it?!

    Unless you use an in-home care provider or a personal nanny in your own home or luck out and find a daycare that will actually let you bring your food in for your own child each day then unfortunately they will be eating whatever they are served at the center you put her in. You just have to flat out tell someone how to feed your child once you hire someone (if you are allowed to use your own food), make a list if you have to. But keep in mind that if you choose a center that prepares their own meals it will all be canned, processed and frozen foods just like they serve in most school cafeterias.
  • cmyers1188
    cmyers1188 Posts: 9 Member
    I'm not a mama, but I am an auntie. I love my babies and often feel like a second mother to them. They are the lights in my life. That said, as an aunt and NOT a mother, I am guilty of what you and other mamas are trying to avoid (GOOD FOR YOU). Why is this? Because those are my babies and I want to give them whatever they want. It is that simple. We are really, really bad at saying NO. We love the adoring looks and best buddy friendship we have with them and deep down, we're afraid of them getting pissed at us and not wanting another sleepover in 3 weeks. My ego can't handle that! Why? 'Cause I'm not a mom.

    But quite honestly, as long as my brother tells me "knock that *kitten* off," I will. I won't do it anymore. They are his kids. His. Not mine. Even if I have to deal with them being angry with me, I adhere to his and his wife's rules now. I respect my brother's parenting even if I want to slip the kid a cookie under the dinner table. I try my best to obey now, even under my roof (except I will always slack a bit and allow an extra 5 minutes of TV time =P )

    Get STERN with them. Even if they get mad at you. Demand respect because YOU are the parent.
  • perkymommy
    perkymommy Posts: 1,640 Member
    edited April 2016
    Villae81 wrote: »
    Your daughter probably gonna hate eating healthy when she's grown if she's deprive from junk food all her childhood life

    She didn't say she deprived her daughter of anything. She said she gives her occasional treats. And there was such a time when processed foods didn't exist and people lived off the land they lived on and the animals on their land. Sugar can be found in fruits. Anything processed isn't good for us. I limited my kids from drinking sodas from a young age and saved them from having cavities like most kids they knew and helped them have stronger bones by drinking more milk and water. It's a personal choice for people.

    A child will hardly suffer in their adult life because they weren't given oreos and sodas on a daily basis, lol. That's a first world problem for sure. I'm sure in some countries there are children that would love to just get a bite of bread or drink of water on a daily basis. This mother is merely trying to raise her child to make the best choices possible when it comes to food.
  • FaylinaMeir
    FaylinaMeir Posts: 659 Member
    if it was my child and someone didn't respect my wishes they wouldn't see my child again until they did. It's pretty simple in my mind. I've dealt with these types of issues before not only for my step son, but foster children that were under my care. (strict dietary guidelines and people not following them, I didn't enforce a diet on a foster child before you accuse me of being crazy)
  • Char231023
    Char231023 Posts: 702 Member
    Your baby is still a baby right? Just wait. Hopefully your kid isn't doesn't start being a picky eater at 2.
  • Mentali
    Mentali Posts: 352 Member
    Oh, welp, once me clarifying an argument turns into snarky jabs at my childhood, I'm out. Have fun with your superiority!
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