cycling friendly (concealed) holster

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Replies

  • MeanderingMammal
    MeanderingMammal Posts: 7,870 Member
    Lizarking wrote: »
    Lizarking wrote: »
    any suggestions? All my go-to brands require a heavy duty belt, but that's not gonna work with exercise clothing.
    Have a compact (p238.)

    Considered top bar bag, but it feels like a bad idea in general.

    A light amount of printing is OK. A shell would be nice.

    Material questions here would be what type of threat you're intending to defend against, and what sort of riding you do, and whether you're riding with someone else who will be delivering supporting fire?

    Also, what sort of notice you're likely to need to use it, noting that you're not carrying in the ready state. My personal pistol is a Sigg229 which uses a de-cocking, rather than a safety. That's fine in a covert set-up but not for something like riding.

    What are your preferences in terms of carrying already? There is little point in recommending something that sits on the chest if you're not comfortable with that, equally I wouldn't recommend something at the high port if you're on a road bike.
    Sig P238 in condition 1, and a Ruger SP101 I carry IWB currently.

    It's tough - the ruger is an anchor. But I'd prefer my .357 wheelgun to a .380 SA when dealing with 4 legged predators.

    I ride solo.

    With that in mind if veer towards something on the frame. If you're thinking something four legged that a pistol will help with then that would be more accessible than anything body mounted.
  • chunkytfg
    chunkytfg Posts: 339 Member
    Lizarking wrote: »

    I usually carry under two layers. The draw is two handed-- One hand pulls and holds/retains all layers of clothing while the other hand draws.

    Cold here is relative too. So no bulky gloves are ever worn.

    And I can't imagine a scenario where drawing (let alone firing) from a moving bicycle could ever have a good outcome.

    Riding away from a nasty but slow varmint is much better than spending an hour in front of a Sheriffs panel, explaining why you unleashed hell on a rattlesnake. :)


    Fair enough. Thanks for answering I wish it didn't get so cold here that we could get away with thin winter gloves but i'm in full heavy duty thermal gloves as the temps are dropping past freezing rapidly.
  • chunkytfg
    chunkytfg Posts: 339 Member
    chunkytfg wrote: »
    Add to that most cycling gloves in the winter I would imagine make operating the safety and pulling the trigger even more of a nightmare?

    It's important to be able to get to your brakes instantly to control your bike. That limits how bulky gloves can be. Also, we're talking about cardiovascular exercise, it warms you up, so you don't want gloves made for, say, downhill skiing.

    The gloves that work best for me on the bike are thin merino wool ones, 100 to 150 grams per square meter. Like a thin base layer, for your hands. They're enough warmth for 35 F and raining, but not too much. And they're very thin. I can control the brake and shifters with these, and use the touch screen on my phone and bike computer. I can light a candle in them.

    As an experienced cyclist I can assure you I know all about the importance of proper cycling attire however I have zero experience with firearms beyond an afternoon of clay pigeon shooting and playing around with pellet rifles as a teenager hence the questions
  • sgt1372
    sgt1372 Posts: 3,966 Member
    edited December 2016
    stealthq wrote: »
    There is still a point to carrying if it takes you a few minutes to draw (not all incidences require Quick Draw McGraw), but you don't want that limitation if you can avoid it.

    LOL!!

    I was avoiding further comment as I watched this thread degenerate but I can't help but comment on this.

    There is truly NO point in carrying if it's going to take you a "few minutes" to draw your weapon.

    It would take less time than that to reach and load a firearm stored unloaded in the trunk of your car in a locked box (as is commonly required if you do not have a license to carry or transport a concealed firearm).

    If your weapon is truly THAT inaccessible, just leave it at home. More than likely, you won't need it anyway. It would be quicker to just run (or, in this case, bike) away. :p
  • NorthCascades
    NorthCascades Posts: 10,767 Member
    @sgt1372 The great irony of "it would be quicker to just run away" is that we're talking about a person on a bike. :smile:
  • helocat
    helocat Posts: 40 Member
    I always carry MTB'ing. I sewed a side access pocket into the lower part of my hydration pack. I can reach back and draw with one hand. G27 usualy. For road riding bit tougher as the outline of the firearm is very clear in a jersey with my extra 50lbs of body weight. I have thought of modifying a tool "Wedge" style frame mounted carrier to have a velcro down side to access, but have not done it to date also the G27 is a chunk for road bike. Road riding I usualy do in groups so have not felt the escalated need to carry to build my road mount. However now with a G43 I might make that road holster it's my daily CW now.

    BTW for MTB, I have practiced on a regular basis drawing and shooting: riding (side and front), standing with one pedal clipped in, laying on the ground (like I just crashed), standing with one hand on the bike etc. Remember to practice drawing and firing from any new holster or carry location.
  • aashwill
    aashwill Posts: 64 Member
    edited December 2016
    Do people who carry guns while biking feel the need to be armed when they go to the beach or go for a run? If so how does that work?
  • sarko15
    sarko15 Posts: 330 Member
    aashwill wrote: »
    Do people who carry guns while biking feel the need to be armed when they go to the beach or go for a run? If so how does that work?

    The same way--a holster. Or they put it in their bag but I always thought that was a little more risky (news about toddlers accidentally shooting people, etc). A lot of people concealed carry all the time, and biking or running isn't necessarily any different. For me it's not worth the hassle and I don't carry, but for some people it's important. Personal preference.
  • sgt1372
    sgt1372 Posts: 3,966 Member
    sarko15 wrote: »
    A lot of people concealed carry all the time, and biking or running isn't necessarily any different. For me it's not worth the hassle and I don't carry, but for some people it's important. Personal preference.

    This is generally my opinion as well. I don't carry 99% of the time but will if I think the circumstances justify the inconvenience and inherent liabilities to do so.

  • AnvilHead
    AnvilHead Posts: 18,379 Member
    edited December 2016
    aashwill wrote: »
    Do people who carry guns while biking feel the need to be armed when they go to the beach or go for a run? If so how does that work?

    http://www.thunderwear.com/about
  • DopeItUp
    DopeItUp Posts: 18,779 Member
    aashwill wrote: »
    Do people who carry guns while biking feel the need to be armed when they go to the beach or go for a run? If so how does that work?

    You have to take extra precautions, of course.







    Salt water is a PITA to deal with.
  • curlsintherack
    curlsintherack Posts: 465 Member
    personally I would not carry a firearm on my bike. This doesn't mean I wouldn't carry because I do but there are times when I could be separated from my bike in the event of an accident or attack. If I were on the ground 20 feet away from my bike then having the gun attached to my body would be critical. Your state may have laws dictating where you can and can not carry on a bicycle. Here in Pennylvania I can open carry my pistol all day everywhere but the second I sit inside a car or put a jacket on then that pistol is considered concealed and a permit is required.

    I wear a ruger lcp in a cheap leather holster from I think desantis that I've treated with a water sealer for leather boots to prevent some moisture. You will need to clean your firearm much more often with all the sweat.
  • NorthCascades
    NorthCascades Posts: 10,767 Member
    aashwill wrote: »
    Do people who carry guns while biking feel the need to be armed when they go to the beach or go for a run? If so how does that work?

    The logistics would be much easier and the gun would be less dangerous to you, running than cycling.
  • stealthq
    stealthq Posts: 4,307 Member
    sgt1372 wrote: »
    stealthq wrote: »
    There is still a point to carrying if it takes you a few minutes to draw (not all incidences require Quick Draw McGraw), but you don't want that limitation if you can avoid it.

    LOL!!

    I was avoiding further comment as I watched this thread degenerate but I can't help but comment on this.

    There is truly NO point in carrying if it's going to take you a "few minutes" to draw your weapon.

    It would take less time than that to reach and load a firearm stored unloaded in the trunk of your car in a locked box (as is commonly required if you do not have a license to carry or transport a concealed firearm).

    If your weapon is truly THAT inaccessible, just leave it at home. More than likely, you won't need it anyway. It would be quicker to just run (or, in this case, bike) away. :p

    It takes more than a couple of minutes to get a firearm out of a locked box in your car unless you happen to already be stopped, or you have one of the systems that fits in easy arm's reach of the driver's seat. Otherwise, if the box is reachable at all while driving, and many installations are not, you have to reach the box and unlock it while trying to keep your eyes on the road. Then you have to load the thing, presuming your ammo is also readily accessible.

    As far as whether there is a point to carrying if it takes a couple of minutes to draw, there are plenty of situations where you think you may need to draw but are not certain. That is when you access the firearm and move it to where you can draw the instant you are convinced it is needed.

    Even when taken by complete surprise, there is the possibility you can buy yourself some time to access your gun using other self-defense tactics, though that is definitely more of a 'Hail Mary'.

    And before you ask, no - I don't carry in such a way myself and never have. But if that were my only option to avoid landing myself in legal trouble due to an inappropriately visible firearm, I'd rather that than go without. I do enough of that as it is since it is illegal to carry at all anywhere on my company's property.
  • Liftng4Lis
    Liftng4Lis Posts: 15,151 Member
    Sued0nim wrote: »
    Where do you live that you can't exercise without a gun?

    USA woman!

    Kytex (no printing).
  • rileyes
    rileyes Posts: 1,398 Member
    edited December 2016
    So many inventions/solutions are popping up as I read this thread. And not just about concealed gun holsters. May I ask the #1 question asked in the fitness forum? What is your goal? What do you want to shoot?
  • b3achy
    b3achy Posts: 1,750 Member
    edited December 2016
    I'd like to say thanks for starting this thread. While I don't bike, I do sometimes find myself out and about and wondering about better options for my concealed carry. Still haven't found a holster that I like (and I've tried few), but I continue to hear a lot recommending the 5.11 shirts, and really need to save up to get one or two of those. There have been a couple of other links posted that have been useful to me as well.

    I would never do a rear holster because one of my law enforcement friends has told me that there are too many accidental discharges (in the law enforcement ranks, not even civilians) where guys have been shooting themselves as they reach for their weapon. He was a big proponent of ankle holsters, if you didn't want to do a shoulder holster, and wouldn't allow the folks in his office to purchase rear holsters. But your mileage may vary.

    As a single female that also geocaches, I often find that I won't go out geocaching in certain locations because of the remoteness and the possibility of being alone (since I prefer to go out solo) and possibly in a situation where I do need to defend myself. I have carried my pistol in my backpack, but would prefer to wear my weapon for the various reasons mentioned above, but especially because I don't want to be separated from my weapon should I need it. As a Stand Up Paddleboarder, I often go out alone, but since I'm on salt water, I don't carry in that situation (yet), but I have been hearing of more and more issues with some boaters and fishermen harassing the other single girls...and unfortunately, they often have faster vessels than we do on our boards. While most of the boaters and fishermen I've run across have been stand up folks, I did have an issue with a couple of boaters just yesterday that kind of creeped me out. So, I'm starting to consider waterproof lock boxes at this point that I can put on my board...going to suck for access time, but I'm figuring after I break my paddle over someone's head, I'm going to need something else at the ready should it come to that.

    And yes, we have that many jerks/pervs/idiots in the US, that single women (and apparently also men) exercising alone need to consider these types of options if they want to go out to get a workout in. We've even had issues in my town along a popular waterfront sidewalk on a very busy street where multiple women jogging in the early evening (just barely dark/twilight) have been getting attacked even with tons of people around. I want to say the last attack was actually in broad daylight, but I'd need to do a bit of research to verify. Frankly, it's why I almost never go out alone at night and am very cautious during the day. IMO, you can never be too safety conscious, especially if you are a solo exerciser.

    So thanks for bringing up this discussion! I've been lurking because I've got little to contribute, but have appreciated the helpful responses to the OP.