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"Drink Shakeology because protein turns to fat"

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Replies

  • jillybeansalad
    jillybeansalad Posts: 239 Member
    Honestly, I'd be more concerned with the levels of lead in Shakeology. :/
  • Treece68
    Treece68 Posts: 780 Member
    lucerorojo wrote: »
    I don't know but the idea that you can't get fat from alcohol doesn't make sense, with CICO. It's still calories. The sugar in it would be used as sugar from any food source, wouldn't it? What does a beer belly come from?

    If you are a heavy drinker you can still gain weight a shot of liqueur (1.5 fl oz) is 97 calories - that would mean 4 shots would be 380 calories. A calorie is a calorie and 4 shots is a meal.
  • ccrdragon
    ccrdragon Posts: 3,249 Member
    Treece68 wrote: »
    lucerorojo wrote: »
    I don't know but the idea that you can't get fat from alcohol doesn't make sense, with CICO. It's still calories. The sugar in it would be used as sugar from any food source, wouldn't it? What does a beer belly come from?

    If you are a heavy drinker you can still gain weight a shot of liqueur (1.5 fl oz) is 97 calories - that would mean 4 shots would be 380 calories. A calorie is a calorie and 4 shots is a meal.

    Actually no - as long as you are not drinking beer/wine (which have significant amounts of carbs) or the sweet mixed drinks (i.e. drinks that contain sugars), or eating a ton of food along with the drinks - straight liquor such as whisky/vodka/scotch/etc. is not converted to fat and is simply eliminated from the body.

    See this article for a fairly good explanation of what happens with alcohol:
    http://www.leangains.com/2010/07/truth-about-alcohol-fat-loss-and-muscle.html
  • wmd1979
    wmd1979 Posts: 469 Member
    ccrdragon wrote: »
    Treece68 wrote: »
    lucerorojo wrote: »
    I don't know but the idea that you can't get fat from alcohol doesn't make sense, with CICO. It's still calories. The sugar in it would be used as sugar from any food source, wouldn't it? What does a beer belly come from?

    If you are a heavy drinker you can still gain weight a shot of liqueur (1.5 fl oz) is 97 calories - that would mean 4 shots would be 380 calories. A calorie is a calorie and 4 shots is a meal.

    Actually no - as long as you are not drinking beer/wine (which have significant amounts of carbs) or the sweet mixed drinks (i.e. drinks that contain sugars), or eating a ton of food along with the drinks - straight liquor such as whisky/vodka/scotch/etc. is not converted to fat and is simply eliminated from the body.

    See this article for a fairly good explanation of what happens with alcohol:
    http://www.leangains.com/2010/07/truth-about-alcohol-fat-loss-and-muscle.html

    Oh good god, there is so much wrong with this it makes me feel dumber even reading it.
  • ccrdragon
    ccrdragon Posts: 3,249 Member
    wmd1979 wrote: »
    ccrdragon wrote: »
    Treece68 wrote: »
    lucerorojo wrote: »
    I don't know but the idea that you can't get fat from alcohol doesn't make sense, with CICO. It's still calories. The sugar in it would be used as sugar from any food source, wouldn't it? What does a beer belly come from?

    If you are a heavy drinker you can still gain weight a shot of liqueur (1.5 fl oz) is 97 calories - that would mean 4 shots would be 380 calories. A calorie is a calorie and 4 shots is a meal.

    Actually no - as long as you are not drinking beer/wine (which have significant amounts of carbs) or the sweet mixed drinks (i.e. drinks that contain sugars), or eating a ton of food along with the drinks - straight liquor such as whisky/vodka/scotch/etc. is not converted to fat and is simply eliminated from the body.

    See this article for a fairly good explanation of what happens with alcohol:
    http://www.leangains.com/2010/07/truth-about-alcohol-fat-loss-and-muscle.html

    Oh good god, there is so much wrong with this it makes me feel dumber even reading it.

    So, please, point out what's wrong with the article?
  • wmd1979
    wmd1979 Posts: 469 Member
    ccrdragon wrote: »
    wmd1979 wrote: »
    ccrdragon wrote: »
    Treece68 wrote: »
    lucerorojo wrote: »
    I don't know but the idea that you can't get fat from alcohol doesn't make sense, with CICO. It's still calories. The sugar in it would be used as sugar from any food source, wouldn't it? What does a beer belly come from?

    If you are a heavy drinker you can still gain weight a shot of liqueur (1.5 fl oz) is 97 calories - that would mean 4 shots would be 380 calories. A calorie is a calorie and 4 shots is a meal.

    Actually no - as long as you are not drinking beer/wine (which have significant amounts of carbs) or the sweet mixed drinks (i.e. drinks that contain sugars), or eating a ton of food along with the drinks - straight liquor such as whisky/vodka/scotch/etc. is not converted to fat and is simply eliminated from the body.

    See this article for a fairly good explanation of what happens with alcohol:
    http://www.leangains.com/2010/07/truth-about-alcohol-fat-loss-and-muscle.html

    Oh good god, there is so much wrong with this it makes me feel dumber even reading it.

    So, please, point out what's wrong with the article?

    I didn't say there was anything wrong with the article, but there is definitely something wrong with your assertion that you will can't possibly gain weight drinking whisky/vodka/scotch because it is "simply eliminated from the body. Unless you can point me to a whisky, vodka, or scotch that contains zero calories then you are absolutely incorrect. When it comes to weight loss, a calorie is still a calorie and any calories consumed from vodka are not miraculously immune to CICO.
  • ccrdragon
    ccrdragon Posts: 3,249 Member
    Actually. current research is showing that alcohol might actually be an exception because of the way that the body metabolizes the alcohol:

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/men/active/mens-health/11135838/Is-booze-making-you-fat-Not-necessarily.html
    https://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/aa35.htm
    http://drinks.seriouseats.com/2013/10/cocktail-science-do-alcohol-calories-count-digesting-spirits.html

    I know, the third one is not a real serious article, but he does have links out to papers and research that backs up his claims.
  • ccrdragon
    ccrdragon Posts: 3,249 Member
    I don't think it is used as energy. Alcohol breaks down in the liver to acetate which is dumped into the blood stream for the kidneys to filter and excrete. Some portion of the acetate gets converted to Acetylcarnitine (but it's not known how much) which is a pre-cursor to the l-carnitine amino acid (not an energy source in and of itself). These is some breakdown into fatty acids, but the liver would only create .8 grams of fat acids from 24 grams of pure alcohol - which means that you would have to drink a toxic amount of alcohol to have any meaningful effect on energy production or weight. Oh, there is also no biological pathway to convert alcohol to sugar, so no energy production there.

    Which explains a lot - ever notice how you feel wiped out and your *kitten* is dragging the ground after a night of drinking? Since energy production is basically put on hold until all of the alcohol is removed from your system, depending on much you drank and how long of a period you drank, you are running on stored reserves. After the alcohol has been removed from your system, the body goes into overtime to replenish the stores - thus making you feel tired and lethargic.

    So basically, yes there are calories in hard liquor, but the vast majority of those calories are not biologically available to the human body.
  • clicketykeys
    clicketykeys Posts: 5,510 Member
    ccrdragon wrote: »
    I don't think it is used as energy. Alcohol breaks down in the liver to acetate which is dumped into the blood stream for the kidneys to filter and excrete. Some portion of the acetate gets converted to Acetylcarnitine (but it's not known how much) which is a pre-cursor to the l-carnitine amino acid (not an energy source in and of itself). These is some breakdown into fatty acids, but the liver would only create .8 grams of fat acids from 24 grams of pure alcohol - which means that you would have to drink a toxic amount of alcohol to have any meaningful effect on energy production or weight. Oh, there is also no biological pathway to convert alcohol to sugar, so no energy production there.

    Which explains a lot - ever notice how you feel wiped out and your *kitten* is dragging the ground after a night of drinking? Since energy production is basically put on hold until all of the alcohol is removed from your system, depending on much you drank and how long of a period you drank, you are running on stored reserves. After the alcohol has been removed from your system, the body goes into overtime to replenish the stores - thus making you feel tired and lethargic.

    So basically, yes there are calories in hard liquor, but the vast majority of those calories are not biologically available to the human body.

    This is really interesting, and I had no idea it worked this way. I'll have to look into it further. I always thought that being tired was due to physical exertion; for me, drinking tends to go hand-in-hand with dancing.

    I always thought "stored reserves" referred to fat.
  • TR0berts
    TR0berts Posts: 7,739 Member
    edited September 2017
    But, if the alcohol is being used for energy, then fat isn't. So while alcohol may not be stored in any way, having it in your system means other fuel sources are not used. So the impact is still based on the number of calories.

    That is/was my thinking, but the nih link seems to refute that. I didn't read all of it, but it seemed to show that even though (some) people consumed extra Calories - by way of alcohol consumption - they weren't actually any heavier/fatter than those who didn't drink, but had the same number of non-alcoholic Calories. Or something to that effect, anyway.

    eta: I'm not entirely sure we can truly conclude that alcohol doesn't contribute to fat/weight gain, based off of that. But, probably at least that it doesn't contribute nearly as much as one might expect.
  • TR0berts wrote: »
    But, if the alcohol is being used for energy, then fat isn't. So while alcohol may not be stored in any way, having it in your system means other fuel sources are not used. So the impact is still based on the number of calories.

    That is/was my thinking, but the nih link seems to refute that. I didn't read all of it, but it seemed to show that even though (some) people consumed extra Calories - by way of alcohol consumption - they weren't actually any heavier/fatter than those who didn't drink, but had the same number of non-alcoholic Calories. Or something to that effect, anyway.

    eta: I'm not entirely sure we can truly conclude that alcohol doesn't contribute to fat/weight gain, based off of that. But, probably at least that it doesn't contribute nearly as much as one might expect.

    yeah dont think drinking alcohol makes you fat as my mom is an alcoholic,she drinks beer all day and eats maybe once a day. its a small meal because she was always thin and ate smaller meals. she is now maybe 70 lbs if that. now for her not eating much is why she is so thin. but if alcohol made you fat or was stored as fat then she should have fat or be fat, she literally has a very small % of fat on her body. even when she ate more food she wasnt fat.
  • alteredsteve175
    alteredsteve175 Posts: 2,591 Member
    Ruatine wrote: »
    I just wanted to say a big thank you, @Gallowmere1984. That site is wonderfully informative.

    +1. I bookmarked that site and will be going back there to learn more.



  • Bella070
    Bella070 Posts: 4 Member
    That's definitely false. Some people who do beach body and call themselves coaches that really don't have a clue should start looking into nutrition and fitness more. Or they should start a course for people to learn. Others I'm sure have great knowledge and use the program as something added into their lifestyle.
    I think it's a the whole idea of what people believe work for their bodies. I personally like smoothies and shakes. I find a lot of the ones out there have too much other added stuff in them so I usually make a shake with hemp powder, chia seed powder or a vegan shake (because I can't do dairy). A lot of them have stevia in them and I can't stand that taste! We don't need to have mega amounts of protein. Our bodies know how much we need.
    I tried shakeology once and know people who drink it daily. I didn't like it at all. It has stevia and I'm assuming that's why I didn't like it. It's outrageously expensive, which is ridiculous. I'm sure it's beneficial for some people because the workouts are great. I mean I like them, but I love a ton of DVD programs that I get off Amazon too and YouTube.
    I would never want to offend anyone who swears by shakeology, but I feel like they are all "drinking the coolade"
    Any healthy protein shake you have replacing a meal or having as a snack while following any program will work I'm sure. It's all about eating healthy and keeping active.