Welcome to Debate Club! Please be aware that this is a space for respectful debate, and that your ideas will be challenged here. Please remember to critique the argument, not the author.

What are your unpopular opinions about health / fitness?

1293294296298299358

Replies

  • Packerjohn
    Packerjohn Posts: 4,855 Member
    edited September 2017
    sijomial wrote: »
    SezxyStef wrote: »
    mph323 wrote: »
    Question about resistance training since we're on the topic. I know cycling isn't considered resistance training in general, but what about hill-climbing? I'm asking because I have technically have osteoporosis, but when I took a spill last year and fell sideways smack onto the pavement still clipped in, while I had deep bruises on my hip from the impact I didn't break anything.

    Since I wasn't doing any other weigh-bearing exercise at the time I've wondered if training on hills had anything to do with not breaking my hip?

    Hill climbing would involve resistance. I can't imagine any other way to get up the hill. ;)

    I have read that biking does not build bone density and that is the point of weight/resistance training and that some studies show that depending on how much you bike you could be reducing bone density.

    Agree - depends on volume of riding, years riding age, type of riding etc etc.
    An elite long distance road rider with very low body mass with years of riding under their belt is going to have a very different issue compared to a recreational mountain biker or sprinter for example.

    https://www.trainingpeaks.com/blog/why-cycling-is-bad-for-bone-density-and-how-you-can-improve-it/

    Bone health, especially for ladies, is important. When my wife was a Radiographer she used to describe the first frost of winter as "Colles fracture weather".

    It is odd the things that affect bone. I attended a seminar on osteoporosis once and they said that walking up stairs does little for bone health but walking down stairs does. They also said the very best thing for bone health is jumping.

    I'd suggest the walking downstairs puts more load on the bone than walking up. Biking would be a lower impact exercise and in theory not the best for dealing with osteoporosis assuming not at high risk for breaking a bone.

    From this article: https://www.nof.org/patients/fracturesfall-prevention/exercisesafe-movement/osteoporosis-exercise-for-strong-bones/

    There are two types of osteoporosis exercises that are important for building and maintaining bone density: weight-bearing and muscle-strengthening exercises.

    Weight-bearing Exercises

    These exercises include activities that make you move against gravity while staying upright. Weight-bearing exercises can be high-impact or low-impact.

    High-impact weight-bearing exercises help build bones and keep them strong. If you have broken a bone due to osteoporosis or are at risk of breaking a bone, you may need to avoid high-impact exercises. If you’re not sure, you should check with your healthcare provider.

    Examples of high-impact weight-bearing exercises are:

    Dancing
    Doing high-impact aerobics
    Hiking
    Jogging/running
    Jumping Rope
    Stair climbing
    Tennis
    Low-impact weight-bearing exercises can also help keep bones strong and are a safe alternative if you cannot do high-impact exercises. Examples of low-impact weight-bearing exercises are:

    Using elliptical training machines
    Doing low-impact aerobics
    Using stair-step machines
    Fast walking on a treadmill or outside


  • jdlobb
    jdlobb Posts: 1,232 Member
    sijomial wrote: »
    SezxyStef wrote: »
    mph323 wrote: »
    Question about resistance training since we're on the topic. I know cycling isn't considered resistance training in general, but what about hill-climbing? I'm asking because I have technically have osteoporosis, but when I took a spill last year and fell sideways smack onto the pavement still clipped in, while I had deep bruises on my hip from the impact I didn't break anything.

    Since I wasn't doing any other weigh-bearing exercise at the time I've wondered if training on hills had anything to do with not breaking my hip?

    Hill climbing would involve resistance. I can't imagine any other way to get up the hill. ;)

    I have read that biking does not build bone density and that is the point of weight/resistance training and that some studies show that depending on how much you bike you could be reducing bone density.

    Agree - depends on volume of riding, years riding age, type of riding etc etc.
    An elite long distance road rider with very low body mass with years of riding under their belt is going to have a very different issue compared to a recreational mountain biker or sprinter for example.

    https://www.trainingpeaks.com/blog/why-cycling-is-bad-for-bone-density-and-how-you-can-improve-it/

    Bone health, especially for ladies, is important. When my wife was a Radiographer she used to describe the first frost of winter as "Colles fracture weather".

    It is odd the things that affect bone. I attended a seminar on osteoporosis once and they said that walking up stairs does little for bone health but walking down stairs does. They also said the very best thing for bone health is jumping.

    see this makes sense to me though. Walking up stairs has little impact on the bone, it's a muscular activity. But walking down stairs is repeatedly stressing your bone, but not using much muscle.
  • TR0berts
    TR0berts Posts: 7,739 Member
    NEOHgirl wrote: »
    Catching up from the weekend - my favorite way to drink cider is to get the soft version and add Captain Morgan to it. Sometimes I mull it, sometimes I don't. Both are delicious.

    Well, yeah. Rum makes (almost) everything better.
  • Need2Exerc1se
    Need2Exerc1se Posts: 13,577 Member
    jdlobb wrote: »
    sijomial wrote: »
    SezxyStef wrote: »
    mph323 wrote: »
    Question about resistance training since we're on the topic. I know cycling isn't considered resistance training in general, but what about hill-climbing? I'm asking because I have technically have osteoporosis, but when I took a spill last year and fell sideways smack onto the pavement still clipped in, while I had deep bruises on my hip from the impact I didn't break anything.

    Since I wasn't doing any other weigh-bearing exercise at the time I've wondered if training on hills had anything to do with not breaking my hip?

    Hill climbing would involve resistance. I can't imagine any other way to get up the hill. ;)

    I have read that biking does not build bone density and that is the point of weight/resistance training and that some studies show that depending on how much you bike you could be reducing bone density.

    Agree - depends on volume of riding, years riding age, type of riding etc etc.
    An elite long distance road rider with very low body mass with years of riding under their belt is going to have a very different issue compared to a recreational mountain biker or sprinter for example.

    https://www.trainingpeaks.com/blog/why-cycling-is-bad-for-bone-density-and-how-you-can-improve-it/

    Bone health, especially for ladies, is important. When my wife was a Radiographer she used to describe the first frost of winter as "Colles fracture weather".

    It is odd the things that affect bone. I attended a seminar on osteoporosis once and they said that walking up stairs does little for bone health but walking down stairs does. They also said the very best thing for bone health is jumping.

    see this makes sense to me though. Walking up stairs has little impact on the bone, it's a muscular activity. But walking down stairs is repeatedly stressing your bone, but not using much muscle.

    Yep, that's pretty much what they said. Best to walk up and down.
  • amusedmonkey
    amusedmonkey Posts: 10,331 Member
    sijomial wrote: »
    SezxyStef wrote: »
    mph323 wrote: »
    Question about resistance training since we're on the topic. I know cycling isn't considered resistance training in general, but what about hill-climbing? I'm asking because I have technically have osteoporosis, but when I took a spill last year and fell sideways smack onto the pavement still clipped in, while I had deep bruises on my hip from the impact I didn't break anything.

    Since I wasn't doing any other weigh-bearing exercise at the time I've wondered if training on hills had anything to do with not breaking my hip?

    Hill climbing would involve resistance. I can't imagine any other way to get up the hill. ;)

    I have read that biking does not build bone density and that is the point of weight/resistance training and that some studies show that depending on how much you bike you could be reducing bone density.

    Agree - depends on volume of riding, years riding age, type of riding etc etc.
    An elite long distance road rider with very low body mass with years of riding under their belt is going to have a very different issue compared to a recreational mountain biker or sprinter for example.

    https://www.trainingpeaks.com/blog/why-cycling-is-bad-for-bone-density-and-how-you-can-improve-it/

    Bone health, especially for ladies, is important. When my wife was a Radiographer she used to describe the first frost of winter as "Colles fracture weather".

    It is odd the things that affect bone. I attended a seminar on osteoporosis once and they said that walking up stairs does little for bone health but walking down stairs does. They also said the very best thing for bone health is jumping.

    In that case, running would be brilliant for bones. You're essentially jumping from leg to leg with impact.
  • Need2Exerc1se
    Need2Exerc1se Posts: 13,577 Member
    sijomial wrote: »
    SezxyStef wrote: »
    mph323 wrote: »
    Question about resistance training since we're on the topic. I know cycling isn't considered resistance training in general, but what about hill-climbing? I'm asking because I have technically have osteoporosis, but when I took a spill last year and fell sideways smack onto the pavement still clipped in, while I had deep bruises on my hip from the impact I didn't break anything.

    Since I wasn't doing any other weigh-bearing exercise at the time I've wondered if training on hills had anything to do with not breaking my hip?

    Hill climbing would involve resistance. I can't imagine any other way to get up the hill. ;)

    I have read that biking does not build bone density and that is the point of weight/resistance training and that some studies show that depending on how much you bike you could be reducing bone density.

    Agree - depends on volume of riding, years riding age, type of riding etc etc.
    An elite long distance road rider with very low body mass with years of riding under their belt is going to have a very different issue compared to a recreational mountain biker or sprinter for example.

    https://www.trainingpeaks.com/blog/why-cycling-is-bad-for-bone-density-and-how-you-can-improve-it/

    Bone health, especially for ladies, is important. When my wife was a Radiographer she used to describe the first frost of winter as "Colles fracture weather".

    It is odd the things that affect bone. I attended a seminar on osteoporosis once and they said that walking up stairs does little for bone health but walking down stairs does. They also said the very best thing for bone health is jumping.

    In that case, running would be brilliant for bones. You're essentially jumping from leg to leg with impact.

    Yes. Well, good for bone density.
  • jseams1234
    jseams1234 Posts: 1,202 Member
    jdlobb wrote: »
    sijomial wrote: »
    SezxyStef wrote: »
    mph323 wrote: »
    Question about resistance training since we're on the topic. I know cycling isn't considered resistance training in general, but what about hill-climbing? I'm asking because I have technically have osteoporosis, but when I took a spill last year and fell sideways smack onto the pavement still clipped in, while I had deep bruises on my hip from the impact I didn't break anything.

    Since I wasn't doing any other weigh-bearing exercise at the time I've wondered if training on hills had anything to do with not breaking my hip?

    Hill climbing would involve resistance. I can't imagine any other way to get up the hill. ;)

    I have read that biking does not build bone density and that is the point of weight/resistance training and that some studies show that depending on how much you bike you could be reducing bone density.

    Agree - depends on volume of riding, years riding age, type of riding etc etc.
    An elite long distance road rider with very low body mass with years of riding under their belt is going to have a very different issue compared to a recreational mountain biker or sprinter for example.

    https://www.trainingpeaks.com/blog/why-cycling-is-bad-for-bone-density-and-how-you-can-improve-it/

    Bone health, especially for ladies, is important. When my wife was a Radiographer she used to describe the first frost of winter as "Colles fracture weather".

    It is odd the things that affect bone. I attended a seminar on osteoporosis once and they said that walking up stairs does little for bone health but walking down stairs does. They also said the very best thing for bone health is jumping.

    see this makes sense to me though. Walking up stairs has little impact on the bone, it's a muscular activity. But walking down stairs is repeatedly stressing your bone, but not using much muscle.

    I'm not so sure about going down not being a "muscular activity".... ask anybody after a very hard leg day which is easier. ;)
  • mathjulz
    mathjulz Posts: 5,526 Member
    sijomial wrote: »
    SezxyStef wrote: »
    mph323 wrote: »
    Question about resistance training since we're on the topic. I know cycling isn't considered resistance training in general, but what about hill-climbing? I'm asking because I have technically have osteoporosis, but when I took a spill last year and fell sideways smack onto the pavement still clipped in, while I had deep bruises on my hip from the impact I didn't break anything.

    Since I wasn't doing any other weigh-bearing exercise at the time I've wondered if training on hills had anything to do with not breaking my hip?

    Hill climbing would involve resistance. I can't imagine any other way to get up the hill. ;)

    I have read that biking does not build bone density and that is the point of weight/resistance training and that some studies show that depending on how much you bike you could be reducing bone density.

    Agree - depends on volume of riding, years riding age, type of riding etc etc.
    An elite long distance road rider with very low body mass with years of riding under their belt is going to have a very different issue compared to a recreational mountain biker or sprinter for example.

    https://www.trainingpeaks.com/blog/why-cycling-is-bad-for-bone-density-and-how-you-can-improve-it/

    Bone health, especially for ladies, is important. When my wife was a Radiographer she used to describe the first frost of winter as "Colles fracture weather".

    It is odd the things that affect bone. I attended a seminar on osteoporosis once and they said that walking up stairs does little for bone health but walking down stairs does. They also said the very best thing for bone health is jumping.

    I remember when I was in college the first time (two decades ago :anguished: ) a teacher talked about a study someone had done where women with osteoporosis were put into two groups. One group just did their regular stuff, and the other group spent a short amount of time (20-30 minutes?) jumping off a box. It was only 4-6" off the ground, IIRC. The second group had significantly more bone density at the end of the study.

    I'd prefer fun exercises to jumping off a box, but any sort of load bearing impact exercise would work, I guess.
  • jdlobb
    jdlobb Posts: 1,232 Member
    mph323 wrote: »
    Oh I get it! "Weight-bearing" and "resistance" don't mean the same thing - hill-climbing would be resistance and strengthen muscles, but weight-bearing like jumping and running are what improves bone density. Thanks all!

    that's a nice, succinct description
  • SezxyStef
    SezxyStef Posts: 15,270 Member
    dythom wrote: »
    Weight loss is easy. There's no "trick". Any diet based on CICO works.

    Most people eat way too many carbs and not enough fat.

    Exercise should be easy and enjoyable.

    doesn't matter about carbs and fat...it's a personal preference really.

    AS for exercise eh...exercise is not that easy typically...enjoyable maybe...if you like it.

    the Key with exercise is finding the least objectionable one.
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 25,789 Member
    dythom wrote: »
    Weight loss is easy. There's no "trick". Any diet based on CICO works.

    Most people eat way too many carbs and not enough fat.

    Exercise should be easy and enjoyable.

    In my world, truly easy exercise is not enjoyable . . . especially over the long haul. There are plenty of very different delicious flavors of 'not easy', though.

    A lot of people should do more LISS, though. (Relax; it's just an opinion. Do what meets your exercise needs, and I'll support you. I think most people should eat more veggies, too, but I don't force-feed my friends brussels sprouts. Mostly. ;) )
  • janejellyroll
    janejellyroll Posts: 25,878 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    dythom wrote: »
    Weight loss is easy. There's no "trick". Any diet based on CICO works.

    Most people eat way too many carbs and not enough fat.

    Exercise should be easy and enjoyable.

    In my world, truly easy exercise is not enjoyable . . . especially over the long haul. There are plenty of very different delicious flavors of 'not easy', though.

    A lot of people should do more LISS, though. (Relax; it's just an opinion. Do what meets your exercise needs, and I'll support you. I think most people should eat more veggies, too, but I don't force-feed my friends brussels sprouts. Mostly. ;) )

    I agree that exercise should usually be something enjoyable, but I'm with you. For me personally, the easy isn't enjoyable. One of the things I love about running (people can substitute their favorite exercise here) is that feeling of doing something that seemed impossible to me at one point or knowing that I pushed myself really hard on a particular run.
  • Need2Exerc1se
    Need2Exerc1se Posts: 13,577 Member
    mph323 wrote: »
    Oh I get it! "Weight-bearing" and "resistance" don't mean the same thing - hill-climbing would be resistance and strengthen muscles, but weight-bearing like jumping and running are what improves bone density. Thanks all!

    If you climb the hill though, you'll likely have to come back down, which would be good for bones.
  • Need2Exerc1se
    Need2Exerc1se Posts: 13,577 Member
    mathjulz wrote: »
    sijomial wrote: »
    SezxyStef wrote: »
    mph323 wrote: »
    Question about resistance training since we're on the topic. I know cycling isn't considered resistance training in general, but what about hill-climbing? I'm asking because I have technically have osteoporosis, but when I took a spill last year and fell sideways smack onto the pavement still clipped in, while I had deep bruises on my hip from the impact I didn't break anything.

    Since I wasn't doing any other weigh-bearing exercise at the time I've wondered if training on hills had anything to do with not breaking my hip?

    Hill climbing would involve resistance. I can't imagine any other way to get up the hill. ;)

    I have read that biking does not build bone density and that is the point of weight/resistance training and that some studies show that depending on how much you bike you could be reducing bone density.

    Agree - depends on volume of riding, years riding age, type of riding etc etc.
    An elite long distance road rider with very low body mass with years of riding under their belt is going to have a very different issue compared to a recreational mountain biker or sprinter for example.

    https://www.trainingpeaks.com/blog/why-cycling-is-bad-for-bone-density-and-how-you-can-improve-it/

    Bone health, especially for ladies, is important. When my wife was a Radiographer she used to describe the first frost of winter as "Colles fracture weather".

    It is odd the things that affect bone. I attended a seminar on osteoporosis once and they said that walking up stairs does little for bone health but walking down stairs does. They also said the very best thing for bone health is jumping.

    I remember when I was in college the first time (two decades ago :anguished: ) a teacher talked about a study someone had done where women with osteoporosis were put into two groups. One group just did their regular stuff, and the other group spent a short amount of time (20-30 minutes?) jumping off a box. It was only 4-6" off the ground, IIRC. The second group had significantly more bone density at the end of the study.

    I'd prefer fun exercises to jumping off a box, but any sort of load bearing impact exercise would work, I guess.

    It's been years since I attended that seminar but I believe they said jumping just 30 times a day was enough for the average otherwise healthy adult to avoid osteoporosis. So 30 jumping jacks, which would take only minutes, should do it.
  • mmapags
    mmapags Posts: 8,946 Member
    edited September 2017
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    dythom wrote: »
    Weight loss is easy. There's no "trick". Any diet based on CICO works.

    Most people eat way too many carbs and not enough fat.

    Exercise should be easy and enjoyable.

    In my world, truly easy exercise is not enjoyable . . . especially over the long haul. There are plenty of very different delicious flavors of 'not easy', though.

    A lot of people should do more LISS, though. (Relax; it's just an opinion. Do what meets your exercise needs, and I'll support you. I think most people should eat more veggies, too, but I don't force-feed my friends brussels sprouts. Mostly. ;) )

    I completely agree with you. I think some activity every day is the way to go and every day can't be high intensity. You body needs time to recover and build on the work. But all those days in between... a nice walk or bike ride is a beautiful thing. Helps with cardio health, active recovery, burns calories etc. I get that it is more time consuming and people have busy lives. So, that can be a factor. But LISS does seem to be unpopular these days.
  • mph323
    mph323 Posts: 3,566 Member
    mph323 wrote: »
    Oh I get it! "Weight-bearing" and "resistance" don't mean the same thing - hill-climbing would be resistance and strengthen muscles, but weight-bearing like jumping and running are what improves bone density. Thanks all!

    If you climb the hill though, you'll likely have to come back down, which would be good for bones.

    Only if you don't crash...
This discussion has been closed.