Cyclists

13468914

Replies

  • Machka9
    Machka9 Posts: 20,945 Member
    Yes, I've got one bicycle in the throws of a gearing fiasco. I purchased the bicycle in 2003 ... got the gearing set up the way I wanted ... cycled lots and lots ... and relatively recently it has started to wear out. Unfortunately Shimano changed everything. Now we're starting from scratch trying to figure out how to set up the new system.

    My husband is my mechanic, and he tried one option that was kind of a quick fix. I went on a 200 km ride, and with about 60 km to go, I couldn't shift the chainring. It was hilly there, so I manually put it into my granny, and just road in that. About 25 km later, it flattened out, so I manually put it into my middle chainring, and rode the rest of the way in that.

    He's in the midst of trying some other solutions involving ordering parts ... but he's really busy with work, so hasn't been able to get to it in a while.

    Fortunately, I have a second long-distance bicycle I can use. :)
  • dutchandkiwi
    dutchandkiwi Posts: 1,389 Member
    I have a Santos Trekking lite Customized to my specs and in a bright lime green (nickname is Kermit) It is mainly used for longer distances and trekking.
    I also have a run of the mill city bike which I use around town
  • sijomial
    sijomial Posts: 19,529 Member
    edited November 2017
    hie2591tf3h1.jpg


    Tried fixing this but ran out of sticky tape and cable ties....

    :neutral:
  • TimothyFish
    TimothyFish Posts: 4,925 Member
    35dollars wrote: »
    That's lovely in theory - in practise however, sometimes it's not that clear-cut.

    For example: I had one of my gear changers fail under warranty (dropped me into lowest gear and ouldn't change). Went back to the bike shop for exchange, and took exactly 4 weeks for the warranty replacement to come back from the manufacturer, and then be fitted by the shop. Without my old/spare bike I would have had to resort to the tube for a month.

    In less extreme cases, you might need a tube after you've run out, or a part that you've haven't got, after the shops have shut, and need to commute the next morning before they open (which has happened to me a number of times) - again, spare bike to the rescue.

    Renting is an option. It just doesn't make sense to have two bikes with the same purpose.
  • Machka9
    Machka9 Posts: 20,945 Member
    35dollars wrote: »
    That's lovely in theory - in practise however, sometimes it's not that clear-cut.

    For example: I had one of my gear changers fail under warranty (dropped me into lowest gear and ouldn't change). Went back to the bike shop for exchange, and took exactly 4 weeks for the warranty replacement to come back from the manufacturer, and then be fitted by the shop. Without my old/spare bike I would have had to resort to the tube for a month.

    In less extreme cases, you might need a tube after you've run out, or a part that you've haven't got, after the shops have shut, and need to commute the next morning before they open (which has happened to me a number of times) - again, spare bike to the rescue.

    Renting is an option. It just doesn't make sense to have two bikes with the same purpose.

    Unless it really matters to you to be able to do the training and events you want to do. :)
  • sijomial
    sijomial Posts: 19,529 Member
    35dollars wrote: »
    That's lovely in theory - in practise however, sometimes it's not that clear-cut.

    For example: I had one of my gear changers fail under warranty (dropped me into lowest gear and ouldn't change). Went back to the bike shop for exchange, and took exactly 4 weeks for the warranty replacement to come back from the manufacturer, and then be fitted by the shop. Without my old/spare bike I would have had to resort to the tube for a month.

    In less extreme cases, you might need a tube after you've run out, or a part that you've haven't got, after the shops have shut, and need to commute the next morning before they open (which has happened to me a number of times) - again, spare bike to the rescue.

    Renting is an option. It just doesn't make sense to have two bikes with the same purpose.

    Makes perfect sense for me.
    I've got plenty of storage room and you get very little return selling used bikes. Occasional use is less expensive than selling an older bike for peanuts and then having to rent plus being far more convenient.
    I wouldn't have set out to own two Roubaix but now I have them I use them both, ditto my two hybrids.
  • amandaeve
    amandaeve Posts: 719 Member
    35dollars wrote: »
    That's lovely in theory - in practise however, sometimes it's not that clear-cut.

    For example: I had one of my gear changers fail under warranty (dropped me into lowest gear and ouldn't change). Went back to the bike shop for exchange, and took exactly 4 weeks for the warranty replacement to come back from the manufacturer, and then be fitted by the shop. Without my old/spare bike I would have had to resort to the tube for a month.

    In less extreme cases, you might need a tube after you've run out, or a part that you've haven't got, after the shops have shut, and need to commute the next morning before they open (which has happened to me a number of times) - again, spare bike to the rescue.

    Renting is an option. It just doesn't make sense to have two bikes with the same purpose.

    .... I have a friend who has at least 30 bikes. He'd probably argue otherwise.
  • charlesdjstanley
    charlesdjstanley Posts: 264 Member
    How do I put my pics here:)
  • jocan11112017
    jocan11112017 Posts: 21 Member
    My one and only. ejxei9fpbops.jpeg
  • NorthCascades
    NorthCascades Posts: 10,882 Member
    35dollars wrote: »
    That's lovely in theory - in practise however, sometimes it's not that clear-cut.

    For example: I had one of my gear changers fail under warranty (dropped me into lowest gear and ouldn't change). Went back to the bike shop for exchange, and took exactly 4 weeks for the warranty replacement to come back from the manufacturer, and then be fitted by the shop. Without my old/spare bike I would have had to resort to the tube for a month.

    In less extreme cases, you might need a tube after you've run out, or a part that you've haven't got, after the shops have shut, and need to commute the next morning before they open (which has happened to me a number of times) - again, spare bike to the rescue.

    Renting is an option. It just doesn't make sense to have two bikes with the same purpose.

    I like having one road bike. I put all of my miles on it, I know how it handles intimately well, I have a lot of confidence in it.

    When it needs attention, getting things fixed is a priority.
  • nelja
    nelja Posts: 282 Member
    I do not have a problem which something is wrong on my bike. My husband is a handy man, bought all the tools and now he is fixing everything, servicing all our bikes. We have 10 bikes on our yard. And it will cost a arm and leg just to service them. Not even talking about fixing a flat, or any other tasks which needs to be done. And he is very into cycling,so everything is a priority.
  • UmmSqueaky
    UmmSqueaky Posts: 715 Member
    as1rh66o6phq.jpg

    All Wisconsin or Wisconsin heritage steel: Waterford, Gunnar and Schwinn. Having lived in the Twin Cities for more than a decade, I feel like I need to add some Surly steel to the mix - hoping to pick up a fat bike sometime this winter.
  • 35dollars
    35dollars Posts: 828 Member
    Renting is an option. It just doesn't make sense to have two bikes with the same purpose.

    Renting to cover the period I was without my main bike would have cost more than buying a new bike! Even the local renters say that long term (more than a few days) is uneconomic. Also, a rental would be unlike to have arrived with bike rack suitable for my paniers.

    I have a 2nd "same" bike, because it's the bike I replaced with the new one - it's hung up on the wall in the garage so it doesn't take up much space, and now performs dual duty of being spare in case of mechanicals with the main one, and (soon to be) turbo trainer bike.

    At the end of the day, it works for me, and that's all I care about!

  • BradyPug
    BradyPug Posts: 26 Member
    A lot of pictures of nice bikes. Am new into cycling and hope to start recreational rides for fun and fitness, but they will have to wait until spring. I picked up a basic Giant Escape. Looking for friends here on MFP also looking at basic cycling and swimming to keep active
  • NorthCascades
    NorthCascades Posts: 10,882 Member
    36738260510_4b0863f6b7_o_d.jpg
  • spider_mark51959
    spider_mark51959 Posts: 2,068 Member
    Specialized Roubaix SL4 2017
    Fuji Royale 1980 model
    Nishiki Cornice 1994
  • TimothyFish
    TimothyFish Posts: 4,925 Member
    35dollars wrote: »
    Renting is an option. It just doesn't make sense to have two bikes with the same purpose.

    Renting to cover the period I was without my main bike would have cost more than buying a new bike! Even the local renters say that long term (more than a few days) is uneconomic. Also, a rental would be unlike to have arrived with bike rack suitable for my paniers.

    I have a 2nd "same" bike, because it's the bike I replaced with the new one - it's hung up on the wall in the garage so it doesn't take up much space, and now performs dual duty of being spare in case of mechanicals with the main one, and (soon to be) turbo trainer bike.

    At the end of the day, it works for me, and that's all I care about!

    If renting is too expensive then maybe one should replace their bike rather than fix it. Or do what I do and ride a bike designed for another purpose while the bike is being repaired.
  • 35dollars
    35dollars Posts: 828 Member
    Why should I replace a bike which is being repaired at no cost? Given that the main and spare bike are perfectly suited to the commuting which is 99% of my riding, why should I ride a bike which is worse at the purpose for which it's being used than the bike I have available?

    I'm going to stop there, because this thread is just getting derailed in an argument over this.
  • TimothyFish
    TimothyFish Posts: 4,925 Member
    35dollars wrote: »
    Why should I replace a bike which is being repaired at no cost? Given that the main and spare bike are perfectly suited to the commuting which is 99% of my riding, why should I ride a bike which is worse at the purpose for which it's being used than the bike I have available?

    I'm going to stop there, because this thread is just getting derailed in an argument over this.

    Any bike will work for commuting. But you seem to be emotional about this. Why?