What are some of your unpopular opinions about food?

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Replies

  • pinuplove
    pinuplove Posts: 12,903 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    pinuplove wrote: »
    (Assuming we're still talking about pumpkin pie here) I've never used the canned pumpkin pie mix (presweetened and spiced). Just the canned pumpkin. Texture isn't an issue here because you want a smooth puree, but I would say many factory-prepared items lose out against home cooked for texture issues (canned soup, for example).

    True, but my problem with using fresh vs. canned pumpkin for pie was exactly the opposite: The texture of the fresh pumpkin is hard to get right, not just from a pureeing standpoint, but also moisture content.

    Oops, that's what I meant - it's a lot of work to prepare fresh pumpkin properly vs popping open a can of perfectly pureed.
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 25,279 Member
    pinuplove wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    pinuplove wrote: »
    (Assuming we're still talking about pumpkin pie here) I've never used the canned pumpkin pie mix (presweetened and spiced). Just the canned pumpkin. Texture isn't an issue here because you want a smooth puree, but I would say many factory-prepared items lose out against home cooked for texture issues (canned soup, for example).

    True, but my problem with using fresh vs. canned pumpkin for pie was exactly the opposite: The texture of the fresh pumpkin is hard to get right, not just from a pureeing standpoint, but also moisture content.

    Oops, that's what I meant - it's a lot of work to prepare fresh pumpkin properly vs popping open a can of perfectly pureed.

    Yeah, I figured - I just found it interesting that the food texture issue for pumpkin (IMO) runs opposite of that for most canned soups and other foods. Canned pumpkin = better texture, other canned foods = mostly worse texture, compared to homemade.
  • CarvedTones
    CarvedTones Posts: 2,340 Member
    pinuplove wrote: »
    Ok, obviously I'm off my comprehension game today :lol: Most canned vegetables are vile too, but frozen are quite good (sometimes better than fresh). All processing is not equal.

    I am full of unpopular opinions today. I think a lot is what you are used to. LeSeur canned English peas are my favorite peas and Green Giant canned Blue Lake green beans are my favorite green beans. I have had both fresh and frozen many times and they can be good, but my favorites come in cans. Speaking of texture, I don't care for Kentucky Wonder green beans fresh or frozen.
  • Dnarules
    Dnarules Posts: 2,080 Member
    pinuplove wrote: »
    pinuplove wrote: »
    lalabank wrote: »
    Traditional American Thanksgiving dinner is over rated. When’s the last time you went out to a nice dinner and ordered turkey?
    On the other hand in left over sandwich form it’s delicious.

    Definitely! If offered both turkey & ham during Thanksgiving I'll go for the ham & maybe eat a little bit of turkey.

    Stuffing is my favorite!

    This might sound mean, but my grandma's pumpkin pie is seriously one of the most disgusting, revolting things ever made. My mom said before that she takes a can of pumpkin pie & basically adds no spices. I remember one Thanksgiving or Christmas my sister & I argued over who had to take it. I ended up tripping out of the suburban that year & the pie broke my fall. So in the end no one had to take it.

    How can anyone mess up pumpkin pie? (No spices, I guess! :lol: ) It's the easiest thing. Dump, stir, bake. I know there are fancy schmanchy recipes out there, but the one on the Libby's can has never failed me (I don't add the whole can of evaporated milk, though).

    There is a lot of nostalgia tied up in recipes passed down for generations, but...
    Six of 10 people preferred the pie made with a can. Just three people preferred the pie made with fresh pumpkin.

    This is one of those cases where the opinion is unpopular, even if studies back it up.

    Fresh pumpkin is a pain in the kitten and not worth the effort. I've done it before. Won't bother again.

    Yeah, we begged our mom to try fresh pumpkin once years ago. We all use canned now lol.
  • pinuplove
    pinuplove Posts: 12,903 Member
    pinuplove wrote: »
    pinuplove wrote: »
    lalabank wrote: »
    Traditional American Thanksgiving dinner is over rated. When’s the last time you went out to a nice dinner and ordered turkey?
    On the other hand in left over sandwich form it’s delicious.

    Definitely! If offered both turkey & ham during Thanksgiving I'll go for the ham & maybe eat a little bit of turkey.

    Stuffing is my favorite!

    This might sound mean, but my grandma's pumpkin pie is seriously one of the most disgusting, revolting things ever made. My mom said before that she takes a can of pumpkin pie & basically adds no spices. I remember one Thanksgiving or Christmas my sister & I argued over who had to take it. I ended up tripping out of the suburban that year & the pie broke my fall. So in the end no one had to take it.

    How can anyone mess up pumpkin pie? (No spices, I guess! :lol: ) It's the easiest thing. Dump, stir, bake. I know there are fancy schmanchy recipes out there, but the one on the Libby's can has never failed me (I don't add the whole can of evaporated milk, though).

    There is a lot of nostalgia tied up in recipes passed down for generations, but...
    Six of 10 people preferred the pie made with a can. Just three people preferred the pie made with fresh pumpkin.

    This is one of those cases where the opinion is unpopular, even if studies back it up.

    Fresh pumpkin is a pain in the kitten and not worth the effort. I've done it before. Won't bother again.

    Another general opinion people don't like to believe - in large batch factory operations, they get products they are cooking up to exactly the desired temperature and use mechanical stirring to ensure it is evenly heated. It is kept at the desired temperature for exactly the desired time. All the spices are measured with extreme accuracy. It is packaged in a hermetically sealed container that makes break down from exposure very slow. It is very difficult to match this in a consumer kitchen. When you actually go head to head, it's hard to beat factory produced food in taste tests. Comparing completely different recipes for something that just has the same general name is different.

    According to Mental Floss, canned pumpkin isn't actually pumpkin. It's a mix of winter squashes.

    Why? Because pumpkin is pretty watery compared to some of the other squashes.

    I've heard Libby's even developed their own. Absolutely no idea if that's true but it sounds good.
  • CarvedTones
    CarvedTones Posts: 2,340 Member
    pinuplove wrote: »
    pinuplove wrote: »
    lalabank wrote: »
    Traditional American Thanksgiving dinner is over rated. When’s the last time you went out to a nice dinner and ordered turkey?
    On the other hand in left over sandwich form it’s delicious.

    Definitely! If offered both turkey & ham during Thanksgiving I'll go for the ham & maybe eat a little bit of turkey.

    Stuffing is my favorite!

    This might sound mean, but my grandma's pumpkin pie is seriously one of the most disgusting, revolting things ever made. My mom said before that she takes a can of pumpkin pie & basically adds no spices. I remember one Thanksgiving or Christmas my sister & I argued over who had to take it. I ended up tripping out of the suburban that year & the pie broke my fall. So in the end no one had to take it.

    How can anyone mess up pumpkin pie? (No spices, I guess! :lol: ) It's the easiest thing. Dump, stir, bake. I know there are fancy schmanchy recipes out there, but the one on the Libby's can has never failed me (I don't add the whole can of evaporated milk, though).

    There is a lot of nostalgia tied up in recipes passed down for generations, but...
    Six of 10 people preferred the pie made with a can. Just three people preferred the pie made with fresh pumpkin.

    This is one of those cases where the opinion is unpopular, even if studies back it up.

    Fresh pumpkin is a pain in the kitten and not worth the effort. I've done it before. Won't bother again.

    Another general opinion people don't like to believe - in large batch factory operations, they get products they are cooking up to exactly the desired temperature and use mechanical stirring to ensure it is evenly heated. It is kept at the desired temperature for exactly the desired time. All the spices are measured with extreme accuracy. It is packaged in a hermetically sealed container that makes break down from exposure very slow. It is very difficult to match this in a consumer kitchen. When you actually go head to head, it's hard to beat factory produced food in taste tests. Comparing completely different recipes for something that just has the same general name is different.

    According to Mental Floss, canned pumpkin isn't actually pumpkin. It's a mix of winter squashes.

    Why? Because pumpkin is pretty watery compared to some of the other squashes.

    If you read it closely, it's more about the headline than the content. Pumpkins are a type of squash - 3 of the types of squash are considered to be pumpkins and the other two are genetically very similar. They are all same genus.
    https://www.thekitchn.com/whats-actually-in-your-canned-pumpkin-puree-ingredient-intelligence-69123
  • GottaBurnEmAll
    GottaBurnEmAll Posts: 7,722 Member
    pinuplove wrote: »
    pinuplove wrote: »
    lalabank wrote: »
    Traditional American Thanksgiving dinner is over rated. When’s the last time you went out to a nice dinner and ordered turkey?
    On the other hand in left over sandwich form it’s delicious.

    Definitely! If offered both turkey & ham during Thanksgiving I'll go for the ham & maybe eat a little bit of turkey.

    Stuffing is my favorite!

    This might sound mean, but my grandma's pumpkin pie is seriously one of the most disgusting, revolting things ever made. My mom said before that she takes a can of pumpkin pie & basically adds no spices. I remember one Thanksgiving or Christmas my sister & I argued over who had to take it. I ended up tripping out of the suburban that year & the pie broke my fall. So in the end no one had to take it.

    How can anyone mess up pumpkin pie? (No spices, I guess! :lol: ) It's the easiest thing. Dump, stir, bake. I know there are fancy schmanchy recipes out there, but the one on the Libby's can has never failed me (I don't add the whole can of evaporated milk, though).

    There is a lot of nostalgia tied up in recipes passed down for generations, but...
    Six of 10 people preferred the pie made with a can. Just three people preferred the pie made with fresh pumpkin.

    This is one of those cases where the opinion is unpopular, even if studies back it up.

    Fresh pumpkin is a pain in the kitten and not worth the effort. I've done it before. Won't bother again.

    Another general opinion people don't like to believe - in large batch factory operations, they get products they are cooking up to exactly the desired temperature and use mechanical stirring to ensure it is evenly heated. It is kept at the desired temperature for exactly the desired time. All the spices are measured with extreme accuracy. It is packaged in a hermetically sealed container that makes break down from exposure very slow. It is very difficult to match this in a consumer kitchen. When you actually go head to head, it's hard to beat factory produced food in taste tests. Comparing completely different recipes for something that just has the same general name is different.

    According to Mental Floss, canned pumpkin isn't actually pumpkin. It's a mix of winter squashes.

    Why? Because pumpkin is pretty watery compared to some of the other squashes.

    If you read it closely, it's more about the headline than the content. Pumpkins are a type of squash - 3 of the types of squash are considered to be pumpkins and the other two are genetically very similar. They are all same genus.
    https://www.thekitchn.com/whats-actually-in-your-canned-pumpkin-puree-ingredient-intelligence-69123

    I did read it. It's saying they're using those other things, not just pumpkin. Except for Libby's, which uses it's own special kind of pumpkin. And the point I was making was that the canned stuff is good because it's not pure pumpkin and that's why we prefer it to pure pumpkin.

  • admaarie
    admaarie Posts: 4,297 Member
    Most people hate onions but I feel like onions are what makes most foods (omelettes, chillis/soups, stir frys) taste the best.

    McDonald’s breakfast is so much better than their food for lunch. Their coffee is also better than Starbucks.

    Taco Bell is absolutely disgusting
  • njitaliana
    njitaliana Posts: 805 Member
    I don't like chocolate
  • CarvedTones
    CarvedTones Posts: 2,340 Member
    pinuplove wrote: »
    pinuplove wrote: »
    lalabank wrote: »
    Traditional American Thanksgiving dinner is over rated. When’s the last time you went out to a nice dinner and ordered turkey?
    On the other hand in left over sandwich form it’s delicious.

    Definitely! If offered both turkey & ham during Thanksgiving I'll go for the ham & maybe eat a little bit of turkey.

    Stuffing is my favorite!

    This might sound mean, but my grandma's pumpkin pie is seriously one of the most disgusting, revolting things ever made. My mom said before that she takes a can of pumpkin pie & basically adds no spices. I remember one Thanksgiving or Christmas my sister & I argued over who had to take it. I ended up tripping out of the suburban that year & the pie broke my fall. So in the end no one had to take it.

    How can anyone mess up pumpkin pie? (No spices, I guess! :lol: ) It's the easiest thing. Dump, stir, bake. I know there are fancy schmanchy recipes out there, but the one on the Libby's can has never failed me (I don't add the whole can of evaporated milk, though).

    There is a lot of nostalgia tied up in recipes passed down for generations, but...
    Six of 10 people preferred the pie made with a can. Just three people preferred the pie made with fresh pumpkin.

    This is one of those cases where the opinion is unpopular, even if studies back it up.

    Fresh pumpkin is a pain in the kitten and not worth the effort. I've done it before. Won't bother again.

    Another general opinion people don't like to believe - in large batch factory operations, they get products they are cooking up to exactly the desired temperature and use mechanical stirring to ensure it is evenly heated. It is kept at the desired temperature for exactly the desired time. All the spices are measured with extreme accuracy. It is packaged in a hermetically sealed container that makes break down from exposure very slow. It is very difficult to match this in a consumer kitchen. When you actually go head to head, it's hard to beat factory produced food in taste tests. Comparing completely different recipes for something that just has the same general name is different.

    According to Mental Floss, canned pumpkin isn't actually pumpkin. It's a mix of winter squashes.

    Why? Because pumpkin is pretty watery compared to some of the other squashes.

    If you read it closely, it's more about the headline than the content. Pumpkins are a type of squash - 3 of the types of squash are considered to be pumpkins and the other two are genetically very similar. They are all same genus.
    https://www.thekitchn.com/whats-actually-in-your-canned-pumpkin-puree-ingredient-intelligence-69123

    I did read it. It's saying they're using those other things, not just pumpkin. Except for Libby's, which uses it's own special kind of pumpkin. And the point I was making was that the canned stuff is good because it's not pure pumpkin and that's why we prefer it to pure pumpkin.

    They are using 5 kinds of squash that are all very closely related from a genetics point of view. 3 of them are commonly called pumpkins and the other 2 are not. You are correct the mix of them seems to be preferred. My point was that it isn't something completely different; the squash all meet the definition of pumpkin as far as classifying food goes even though a couple of them are commonly called something else and would look funny on your porch. The headline makes it sound like they use something that isn't really pumpkin.
  • seltzermint555
    seltzermint555 Posts: 10,742 Member
    Machka9 wrote: »
    glassyo wrote: »
    Can we judge in here because....not liking oreos??? No point to chocolate milk??? I just died a little inside. :(

    Oreos are a very boring cookie.

    Chocolate milk makes me sick. I'd much rather eat a chocolate bar.

    I don't get drinking chocolate milk with a meal, which was mostly what I saw as a kid -- other kids buying chocolate milk with their lunches, or friends having chocolate milk with lunch or dinner at home. The idea of drinking something chocolatey and sweet to wash down your meatloaf or tuna casserole was just absolutely gross to me. And if it's not as part of a meal, there are so many tastier treats than chocolate milk.

    But you're so wrong on Oreos. Of course, they should be dunked in coffee.

    I was an oddball as a child. Other kids bought chocolate milk or fruit juice during recess, and I bought tomato juice. I suspect the reason they kept selling it is because I kept buying it haha. I didn't like chocolate milk and still don't (it tastes kind of grainy and heavy). If I had to get flavored milk it was strawberry milk.

    Just curious - do you still enjoy the taste of strawberry milk? I ask because I loved it as a kid, but it's one of those things I've tried more recently and thought "ick this is like pink, sugar flavored milk" and I'm definitely not one of those people who ever really says things like "this treat is too sweet for me". Also it may have been the brand I tried (Nesquik) but it's the same strawberry milk I drank as a kid. Dunno.

    There's a small dairy in Fordland, Missouri, that does the most amazing flavored milks though. They have orange creamsicle and cotton candy milk. Both sound terrible but they're delicious. Sweet, but so delicious and creamy like a dessert.
  • lynn_glenmont
    lynn_glenmont Posts: 9,456 Member
    A substantiated opinion - the case against using GMO products is complete woo. Every major health organization around the world (CDC, WHO, EUPHA, etc) endorses them as safe. Purposefully avoiding GMO products is pretty much anti-science. A lot of common products avoid them because of public perception so we end up avoiding them without trying. There are reasons to hate Monsanto's business practices with respect to GMO crops. It's a real shame; GMO crops have more yield per acre, reducing the amount of farmland that needs to be cleared. They are more tolerant of drought, increasing the food supply in some areas that need it most. They are more bug resistant, decreasing the need for pesticides that often pollute water supplies.
    pinuplove wrote: »
    A substantiated opinion - the case against using GMO products is complete woo. Every major health organization around the world (CDC, WHO, EUPHA, etc) endorses them as safe. Purposefully avoiding GMO products is pretty much anti-science. A lot of common products avoid them because of public perception so we end up avoiding them without trying. There are reasons to hate Monsanto's business practices with respect to GMO crops. It's a real shame; GMO crops have more yield per acre, reducing the amount of farmland that needs to be cleared. They are more tolerant of drought, increasing the food supply in some areas that need it most. They are more bug resistant, decreasing the need for pesticides that often pollute water supplies.

    Agreed. I have zero issue with GMOs.

    There is no more rational basis for having a blanket opinion about all GMOs than there is for having a blanket opinion about all possible non GMO organisms. Some will be generally safe for all people, with a very low incidence of allergies. Some will be toxic. And there will be foods that fall somewhere between those extremes.
    The process of genetically modifying something doesn't make it automatically safe to eat, anymore than the fact that something isn't genetically modified (by humans through gene manipulation) makes it safe to eat.

    Please identify an example of a food that wasn't toxic before modification and is afterwards.

    The CDC, WHO, EUPHA and all the other major health organizations are making evidence based scientific conclusions. IMO, trusting science is more rational than dismissing it because I don't like blanket conclusions. There is no rational basis for assuming that modification makes something unsafe to eat when there is no evidence to support that. Science rarely if ever claims 100% certainty of anything only because it is logistically impossible to ever be 100% certain. That doesn't put an unproven hypothesis that isn't based on any evidence on equal footing.

    EDIT - Also, they don't just create some new GMO variant and start selling it as food without extensive testing. Mostly they are making sure there is a benefit to the modification, but they do test to make sure the food is acceptable (taste, texture and doesn't kill anyone) as well as achieving their objective (better, yield, more nutrition, higher tolerance to adverse conditions, world peace, etc).

    Each GMO food is its own individual case, so having "zero issues" with GMOs is like having "zero issues" with all potential foods There is nothing magical about the GMO process that guarantees that all foods will be safe for all people. I'm perfectly happy to eat GMOs if they have been well-vetted AND if I am allowed access to information about what the modification is. I'm about basing judgments on as much information as possible, so don't try to insinuate that I'm anti-science or anti-evidence. If the evidence is there, there shouldn't be any objection to letting consumers have access to it in each case.

    What if they've inserted protein-generating sequences from wheat into a tomato, and I have celiac disease?

    I forget the details, but there was a GMO fish that was being brought to market, and they had subbed some gene sequences from a fish that reaches adult weight more quickly than the original fish they were modifying. I would not eat that UNTIL I was able to obtain further information about the fish they were getting the fast-growth genes from. It was a fish that was also commonly eaten by humans, so for me, it was not a concern.

    Given the number of drugs that have been approved and brought to market with horrific consequences during my lifetime, due to inadequate vetting, I reserve the right to make my own judgment about each instance of something new that has been "extensively tested" (in the case of GMOs, these extensive tests appear to be on the order of a year or two, which is hardly enough to judge long-term effects).

    Long winded way of saying that no, you can't identify a single instance of the issue that you are worried about. But since I can't prove the sky isn't falling I guess you might as well wear the tin foil hat for protection in case it is.

    You are taking the very unscientific position that if something is produced by a particular process, it must be healthful, regardless of what ingredients were used to produce it. I think you better check your own headgear.

    And the headgear of the CDC, WHO, EUPHA and other major health organization scientists, who I trust more than other internet posters and that should be trusted more than me. They all endorse GMO. Many GMO crops would allow us to feed more people using less resources. But the fear of them is too widespread, and even though that fear isn't based on hard science (it actually discredits hard science), farmers and merchants are reluctant to use them. Less people would die if it weren't for the irrational fear of GMO crops.

    No, they endorse individual GMO foods/crops, or they endorse GMO as a useful way to quickly develop crops that grow better than conventional crops under certain adverse conditions or have a higher yield. There is no scientific basis for saying that because GMO Foods (1 to X) are safe, than then all GMO Foods (x+1 to infinity) will be safe. You really seem to be missing the point.


    Edited to fix typo.

    Yes, there is scientific basis to say that the odds of GMO introducing an unsafe variant are not higher than natural mutations or cross breeding without GMO which are not as carefully monitored as GMO. There is unfounded fear in the face of science; this is nothing new. I am not missing your point at all; it just isn't based on anything meaningful. A little more education and understanding would help you get past your fear.

    I don't have "fear," so it is impossible for me to have "unfounded fear." And questioning someone's education and understanding is an ad hominem attack -- the refuge of those who have run out of logical support for their own arguments.
  • amusedmonkey
    amusedmonkey Posts: 10,331 Member
    Machka9 wrote: »
    glassyo wrote: »
    Can we judge in here because....not liking oreos??? No point to chocolate milk??? I just died a little inside. :(

    Oreos are a very boring cookie.

    Chocolate milk makes me sick. I'd much rather eat a chocolate bar.

    I don't get drinking chocolate milk with a meal, which was mostly what I saw as a kid -- other kids buying chocolate milk with their lunches, or friends having chocolate milk with lunch or dinner at home. The idea of drinking something chocolatey and sweet to wash down your meatloaf or tuna casserole was just absolutely gross to me. And if it's not as part of a meal, there are so many tastier treats than chocolate milk.

    But you're so wrong on Oreos. Of course, they should be dunked in coffee.

    I was an oddball as a child. Other kids bought chocolate milk or fruit juice during recess, and I bought tomato juice. I suspect the reason they kept selling it is because I kept buying it haha. I didn't like chocolate milk and still don't (it tastes kind of grainy and heavy). If I had to get flavored milk it was strawberry milk.

    Just curious - do you still enjoy the taste of strawberry milk? I ask because I loved it as a kid, but it's one of those things I've tried more recently and thought "ick this is like pink, sugar flavored milk" and I'm definitely not one of those people who ever really says things like "this treat is too sweet for me". Also it may have been the brand I tried (Nesquik) but it's the same strawberry milk I drank as a kid. Dunno.

    There's a small dairy in Fordland, Missouri, that does the most amazing flavored milks though. They have orange creamsicle and cotton candy milk. Both sound terrible but they're delicious. Sweet, but so delicious and creamy like a dessert.

    Yes, I still enjoy it. It is a little bit too sweet for me now, but not enough to make it unenjoyable. I like the creaminess and the flavor. I get what you mean, though. I don't enjoy banana flavored milk nearly as much as I used to when I was a child. On the rare occasion that I drink flavored milk, I go for strawberry if given the choice, banana a very distant second, and chocolate is in the "I'd rather not have any" category.
  • GottaBurnEmAll
    GottaBurnEmAll Posts: 7,722 Member
    pinuplove wrote: »
    pinuplove wrote: »
    lalabank wrote: »
    Traditional American Thanksgiving dinner is over rated. When’s the last time you went out to a nice dinner and ordered turkey?
    On the other hand in left over sandwich form it’s delicious.

    Definitely! If offered both turkey & ham during Thanksgiving I'll go for the ham & maybe eat a little bit of turkey.

    Stuffing is my favorite!

    This might sound mean, but my grandma's pumpkin pie is seriously one of the most disgusting, revolting things ever made. My mom said before that she takes a can of pumpkin pie & basically adds no spices. I remember one Thanksgiving or Christmas my sister & I argued over who had to take it. I ended up tripping out of the suburban that year & the pie broke my fall. So in the end no one had to take it.

    How can anyone mess up pumpkin pie? (No spices, I guess! :lol: ) It's the easiest thing. Dump, stir, bake. I know there are fancy schmanchy recipes out there, but the one on the Libby's can has never failed me (I don't add the whole can of evaporated milk, though).

    There is a lot of nostalgia tied up in recipes passed down for generations, but...
    Six of 10 people preferred the pie made with a can. Just three people preferred the pie made with fresh pumpkin.

    This is one of those cases where the opinion is unpopular, even if studies back it up.

    Fresh pumpkin is a pain in the kitten and not worth the effort. I've done it before. Won't bother again.

    Another general opinion people don't like to believe - in large batch factory operations, they get products they are cooking up to exactly the desired temperature and use mechanical stirring to ensure it is evenly heated. It is kept at the desired temperature for exactly the desired time. All the spices are measured with extreme accuracy. It is packaged in a hermetically sealed container that makes break down from exposure very slow. It is very difficult to match this in a consumer kitchen. When you actually go head to head, it's hard to beat factory produced food in taste tests. Comparing completely different recipes for something that just has the same general name is different.

    According to Mental Floss, canned pumpkin isn't actually pumpkin. It's a mix of winter squashes.

    Why? Because pumpkin is pretty watery compared to some of the other squashes.

    If you read it closely, it's more about the headline than the content. Pumpkins are a type of squash - 3 of the types of squash are considered to be pumpkins and the other two are genetically very similar. They are all same genus.
    https://www.thekitchn.com/whats-actually-in-your-canned-pumpkin-puree-ingredient-intelligence-69123

    I did read it. It's saying they're using those other things, not just pumpkin. Except for Libby's, which uses it's own special kind of pumpkin. And the point I was making was that the canned stuff is good because it's not pure pumpkin and that's why we prefer it to pure pumpkin.

    They are using 5 kinds of squash that are all very closely related from a genetics point of view. 3 of them are commonly called pumpkins and the other 2 are not. You are correct the mix of them seems to be preferred. My point was that it isn't something completely different; the squash all meet the definition of pumpkin as far as classifying food goes even though a couple of them are commonly called something else and would look funny on your porch. The headline makes it sound like they use something that isn't really pumpkin.

    Tone, I love ya, but there's colloquial language I'm talking here!