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What Was Your Work Out Today?

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  • surfbug808surfbug808 Member Posts: 251 Member Member Posts: 251 Member
    Easing back to gym workouts. 30 min stretching/warm-up, rowing machine, 60 min KB, abs, obliques
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Member, Premium Posts: 15,931 Member Member, Premium Posts: 15,931 Member
    Rest day yesterday, today back to 9,705 rowing machine meters, steady state pace. The actual work part (8K) averaged 2:31.9 pace, 20spm. According to Garmin, roughly half zone 4, a third zone 3, including the row in/out and CD.
  • BrownSugar174BrownSugar174 Member Posts: 311 Member Member Posts: 311 Member
    90 minutes on the elliptical machine! FOR! THE! FIRST! TIME! I normally do between 45 to 60 minutes! I was inspired by a fellow MFP member!!
  • MikePfirrmanMikePfirrman Member Posts: 1,641 Member Member Posts: 1,641 Member
    Yesterday at the gym was 30 minutes of rowing, 30 of Stationary bike, rest on the Endless Rope machine (like climbing a rope), Stairmaster and Spin Bike (2 hours total). Literally hopped into the pool yesterday (it's like 60 degrees) a few times after getting in the hot tub. It's the first time (this year) I've ever had a pool or a hot tub and I now see how valuable it is to take "ice baths". The amount of inflammation after a killer workout is ridiculously less after dipping into icy water for a minute or two a few times! Beyond grateful to have that as a recovery tool now.

    For those wanting to do this, all you really need to do is hop in a cold shower, then take a hot bath (with Epsom salts). Same principle. My DOMS has been significantly less on days I do this.
    edited December 2019
  • jhanleybrownjhanleybrown Member Posts: 229 Member Member Posts: 229 Member
    Active recovery day. So far 35 min walking dog before work but goal is another 30 at lunch and 30 (with dog) after dinner. Body definitely craving a recovery day.
  • notmyachillesheel8notmyachillesheel8 Member Posts: 285 Member Member Posts: 285 Member
    Went HAM on upper body, then ran 1.5 miles then yoga to cool down
  • mtaratootmtaratoot Member Posts: 3,305 Member Member Posts: 3,305 Member
    I had a good strength session yesterday, and I was able to add weight for four of the six things I do that use weights. For some of the body weight exercises, I am ready to add some weight or find alternative exercises.

    Warm up on a newer ergometer that I'm not used to. It's a "dynamic rower," and the sliding seat really doesn't move like I'm used to. I am not sure about technique, but I think I started to get used to it. There's a couple staff at the gym I can ask when I see them. The person that was there yesterday didn't know much about 'em.

    Three giant sets of three groups of four exercises done without a break between, and a 90 second break between groups of four exercises:

    Goblet squats
    Left side lunge
    Right side lunge
    Deadlift on a cable machine
    <90 second rest>
    Push up
    Smith machine row
    Dumbbell curl-to-press
    Assisted pull up
    <90 second rest>
    Tricep press
    Ab exercise similar to Dead Bug
    Plank
    Back Extension
    <90 second rest>
    Cool-down on treadmill

    Followed by 20 minute swim

    Can anybody here tell me anything about the Concept 2 "Dynamic Rower?"
  • MikePfirrmanMikePfirrman Member Posts: 1,641 Member Member Posts: 1,641 Member
    mtaratoot wrote: »
    I had a good strength session yesterday, and I was able to add weight for four of the six things I do that use weights. For some of the body weight exercises, I am ready to add some weight or find alternative exercises.

    Warm up on a newer ergometer that I'm not used to. It's a "dynamic rower," and the sliding seat really doesn't move like I'm used to. I am not sure about technique, but I think I started to get used to it. There's a couple staff at the gym I can ask when I see them. The person that was there yesterday didn't know much about 'em.

    Three giant sets of three groups of four exercises done without a break between, and a 90 second break between groups of four exercises:

    Goblet squats
    Left side lunge
    Right side lunge
    Deadlift on a cable machine
    <90 second rest>
    Push up
    Smith machine row
    Dumbbell curl-to-press
    Assisted pull up
    <90 second rest>
    Tricep press
    Ab exercise similar to Dead Bug
    Plank
    Back Extension
    <90 second rest>
    Cool-down on treadmill

    Followed by 20 minute swim

    Can anybody here tell me anything about the Concept 2 "Dynamic Rower?"

    The Dynamic is a C2 (Concept2) that moves with you, so the whole piece moves as you "row". It's to make the feel of the machine feel more realistic. The issue with the Dynamic is that there's not as many people that have it and there's a ton of fun little interactive tools.

    I've never done a Dynamic personally, but my guess is that you have to rely more on your legs and not your upper body (makes "cheating" with your upper body harder). You see a lot of folks (and I'm not saying you do this) at the gym that just slide back and forth on the seat of the Concept2 believing that is rowing. Rowing is the torque that is consistently generated on the chain/drive that has nothing to do with the seat moving back and forth, except tangently as a secondary affect. My guess is that the Dynamic forces you to drive with your legs, which you should do anyway to be honest.

    Here's a good video with Eric Murray, one of the (if not the) best Over the water rower ever.

    edited December 2019
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Member, Premium Posts: 15,931 Member Member, Premium Posts: 15,931 Member
    mtaratoot wrote: »
    I had a good strength session yesterday, and I was able to add weight for four of the six things I do that use weights. For some of the body weight exercises, I am ready to add some weight or find alternative exercises.

    Warm up on a newer ergometer that I'm not used to. It's a "dynamic rower," and the sliding seat really doesn't move like I'm used to. I am not sure about technique, but I think I started to get used to it. There's a couple staff at the gym I can ask when I see them. The person that was there yesterday didn't know much about 'em.

    Three giant sets of three groups of four exercises done without a break between, and a 90 second break between groups of four exercises:

    Goblet squats
    Left side lunge
    Right side lunge
    Deadlift on a cable machine
    <90 second rest>
    Push up
    Smith machine row
    Dumbbell curl-to-press
    Assisted pull up
    <90 second rest>
    Tricep press
    Ab exercise similar to Dead Bug
    Plank
    Back Extension
    <90 second rest>
    Cool-down on treadmill

    Followed by 20 minute swim

    Can anybody here tell me anything about the Concept 2 "Dynamic Rower?"

    What do you want to know about it? I usually row the standard C2 mod D, but I've rowed the dynamic a few times, including once configured as a double, where you row in sync with a partner, like in a boat.

    I know it's kind of a mind-F for some people who're used to the standard rowers (I've seen it happen ;) ). I think the biggest deal is that some of the bad habits one can develop on the standard rower are "punished" by the dynamic (it'll smack into the back/front ends instead of seat staying mostly centered like you'd like). For on-water rowers, this can be a plus, because those same bad habits can slow ("check") a boat.

    Fundamentally - and I don't know how to say this really clearly - you want to be pushing/pulling while your body mostly stays in one place (minimal movement of seat) wrt the machine, so you're sort of coiling/uncoiling force from your center, your feet move through space, and the force of legs/body/arms all go into the flywheel. The main "bad habits" that interfere IMO, in brief, are rushing the slide (on the recovery), rather than just letting it happen; and general lack of patience/structure through the stroke. Layback problems will show up, for example.

    People who are used to machine-only rowing (vs. sliding-seat on-water skinny boats ;) ) often develop a tendency of using explosive but kinda untidy ;) force that doesn't work well on the dynamic or on water. For example, at machine races I've attended, they recruited women rowers to stand on the front feet of the C2 during prime-rowing-age men's heavyweight races to keep the machines from scooting across the floor. :lol: That's wasted force, and mechanics that would Not Work Well on the water.

    There are various videos, but this shows the basic stroke appearance well, I think:

    edited December 2019
  • MelanieCN77MelanieCN77 Member Posts: 4,036 Member Member Posts: 4,036 Member
    Half hour run this morning, and will skate three hours this evening.
  • mtaratootmtaratoot Member Posts: 3,305 Member Member Posts: 3,305 Member
    Thanks @AnnPT77 and @MikePfirrman

    This makes sense, and it makes me feel good that I was doing it more correct than I thought! I will continue to use it some of the time. Other times, for my needs, I think the older model may work better. I know I will make some rowers cringe when I do what I do sometimes, but it's because I am an oarsman, not a rower.

    The difference? I row a heavily-loaded gear raft, not a light, skinny shell or scull. My seat doesn't move. I lean forward to plant the oars, give a fairly quick (and hopefully powerful) pull, and raise the oars. Most of the time, I actually PUSH the oars to stay in the current and "drive" the boat where I want it to go. But when I need to put on the power, like to ferry across current or get away from an obstacle, it's time to pull. Spin to win; pull to get your line, then push. So when I'm practicing for rowing a raft, I do what is anathema to rowers; I move my upper body.

    One similarity is where the power is. Short strokes are awesome because the blade is perpendicular to the water. If you engage the stroke too early, you are pushing water away from the boat rather than moving it; it's a rotational stroke that spins the boat more than moves it. If you keep the stroke going too long - you are pulling water IN. For pushing, this is especially true because the pull muscles are more powerful. Just keeping an oar in the water and taking short, powerful strokes helps make miles. In the wind, I try to feather the oars when they are out of the water.

    Thanks again for the explanation of why this machine is different. I was actually going to send a PM to @AnnPT77, but as I understand, it wouldn't be delivered since we aren't friends.

    If you are also a whitewater enthusiast, I wish you luck in the permit lottery. I have decided on the dates I'm going to apply for, and all I need to do is pay for my entries. Grand Canyon lottery isn't until February.
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Member, Premium Posts: 15,931 Member Member, Premium Posts: 15,931 Member
    mtaratoot wrote: »
    Thanks @AnnPT77 and @MikePfirrman

    This makes sense, and it makes me feel good that I was doing it more correct than I thought! I will continue to use it some of the time. Other times, for my needs, I think the older model may work better. I know I will make some rowers cringe when I do what I do sometimes, but it's because I am an oarsman, not a rower.

    The difference? I row a heavily-loaded gear raft, not a light, skinny shell or scull. My seat doesn't move. I lean forward to plant the oars, give a fairly quick (and hopefully powerful) pull, and raise the oars. Most of the time, I actually PUSH the oars to stay in the current and "drive" the boat where I want it to go. But when I need to put on the power, like to ferry across current or get away from an obstacle, it's time to pull. Spin to win; pull to get your line, then push. So when I'm practicing for rowing a raft, I do what is anathema to rowers; I move my upper body.

    One similarity is where the power is. Short strokes are awesome because the blade is perpendicular to the water. If you engage the stroke too early, you are pushing water away from the boat rather than moving it; it's a rotational stroke that spins the boat more than moves it. If you keep the stroke going too long - you are pulling water IN. For pushing, this is especially true because the pull muscles are more powerful. Just keeping an oar in the water and taking short, powerful strokes helps make miles. In the wind, I try to feather the oars when they are out of the water.

    Thanks again for the explanation of why this machine is different. I was actually going to send a PM to @AnnPT77, but as I understand, it wouldn't be delivered since we aren't friends.

    If you are also a whitewater enthusiast, I wish you luck in the permit lottery. I have decided on the dates I'm going to apply for, and all I need to do is pay for my entries. Grand Canyon lottery isn't until February.

    It's probably getting too detailed for this forum (apologies, other readers/users), but the bolded isn't exactly true for sliding seat rowing. We try to be long in the water, within some technical limitations I won't go into.

    The reasons are alluded to in the good video Mike posted: We have a sliding seat, so we're placing the oar blades, then prying the boat past them in the water. Because the seat slides, we can have the blade in the water longer, not just the basic pry distance but some of the distance the seat will slide, and still have the blade fairly perpendicular to the water (enough to get good force).

    One pries on the drive, then (oversimplifying, especially if talking under race conditions), one just relaxes and lets the boat do the recovery (glide under the reasonably-still body, in terms of motion wrt the riverbank) so the boat's travel (combined with the slide's slight tilt and the seat-wheels) brings the boat under the body and one arrives back at the catch position with little effort.

    I don't know anything about details of rigging for your style of boats, but in standard racing-type rowing shells, there are a bunch of quite-subtle technical aspects of the blade design, very precision angles built/adjusted into the oarlocks, riggers, foot-stretchers, etc., to enhance that ability to keep useful/effective force on the blade-face longer through the water. Under ideal conditions (high level competitve teams), some aspects of this are tailored to the individual rower's body configuration quite precisely. Interesting physics/mechanics. :)
  • daveredvettedaveredvette Member Posts: 72 Member Member Posts: 72 Member
    Tried new workout at my club. They are offering free classes to new year.
    Zone60. Mix of cardio and body weight and free weight. Heart rate zones and class 60 min.

    Now need to figure out how to get MyZone monitor to sync with MyFitnessPal or manual entry
  • mtaratootmtaratoot Member Posts: 3,305 Member Member Posts: 3,305 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    mtaratoot wrote: »
    Thanks @AnnPT77 and @MikePfirrman

    This makes sense, and it makes me feel good that I was doing it more correct than I thought! I will continue to use it some of the time. Other times, for my needs, I think the older model may work better. I know I will make some rowers cringe when I do what I do sometimes, but it's because I am an oarsman, not a rower.

    The difference? I row a heavily-loaded gear raft, not a light, skinny shell or scull. My seat doesn't move. I lean forward to plant the oars, give a fairly quick (and hopefully powerful) pull, and raise the oars. Most of the time, I actually PUSH the oars to stay in the current and "drive" the boat where I want it to go. But when I need to put on the power, like to ferry across current or get away from an obstacle, it's time to pull. Spin to win; pull to get your line, then push. So when I'm practicing for rowing a raft, I do what is anathema to rowers; I move my upper body.

    One similarity is where the power is. Short strokes are awesome because the blade is perpendicular to the water. If you engage the stroke too early, you are pushing water away from the boat rather than moving it; it's a rotational stroke that spins the boat more than moves it. If you keep the stroke going too long - you are pulling water IN. For pushing, this is especially true because the pull muscles are more powerful. Just keeping an oar in the water and taking short, powerful strokes helps make miles. In the wind, I try to feather the oars when they are out of the water.

    Thanks again for the explanation of why this machine is different. I was actually going to send a PM to @AnnPT77, but as I understand, it wouldn't be delivered since we aren't friends.

    If you are also a whitewater enthusiast, I wish you luck in the permit lottery. I have decided on the dates I'm going to apply for, and all I need to do is pay for my entries. Grand Canyon lottery isn't until February.

    It's probably getting too detailed for this forum (apologies, other readers/users), but the bolded isn't exactly true for sliding seat rowing. We try to be long in the water, within some technical limitations I won't go into.

    The reasons are alluded to in the good video Mike posted: We have a sliding seat, so we're placing the oar blades, then prying the boat past them in the water. Because the seat slides, we can have the blade in the water longer, not just the basic pry distance but some of the distance the seat will slide, and still have the blade fairly perpendicular to the water (enough to get good force).

    One pries on the drive, then (oversimplifying, especially if talking under race conditions), one just relaxes and lets the boat do the recovery (glide under the reasonably-still body, in terms of motion wrt the riverbank) so the boat's travel (combined with the slide's slight tilt and the seat-wheels) brings the boat under the body and one arrives back at the catch position with little effort.

    I don't know anything about details of rigging for your style of boats, but in standard racing-type rowing shells, there are a bunch of quite-subtle technical aspects of the blade design, very precision angles built/adjusted into the oarlocks, riggers, foot-stretchers, etc., to enhance that ability to keep useful/effective force on the blade-face longer through the water. Under ideal conditions (high level competitve teams), some aspects of this are tailored to the individual rower's body configuration quite precisely. Interesting physics/mechanics. :)

    When I paddle a kayak or canoe, the catch is much farther forward.

    In a whitewater canoe, the catch is pretty far out front, and it starts with rotating your body the other direction. At the catch, you rotate your body and let your core do the work. Your hips are snug in the boat, and you pull the boat through the water while you rotate your body. Once your paddle is by your ankles, you stop powering it because then you are lifting water; you let the glide finish the stroke.

    A kayak is similar. The catch for a forward stroke is out by my ankles, then I pull the boat through the water. Same glide at the end.

    My raft carries LOTS of stuff. Here's an example from July 2018 at Upper Black Bar Falls on the Rogue River.

    1s4n9ie23att.jpg
  • MikePfirrmanMikePfirrman Member Posts: 1,641 Member Member Posts: 1,641 Member
    That water rafting looks like a blast!

    Rain (rare to have this much in Tucson) put a literal damper on my patio row today. Directional rain and 40 MPH didn't sound like fun, so I opted to do the AD Pro -- 12 sets of 90 seconds with 60 slow. 15 minutes Warmup. Did the trick -- not as brutal as intervals on the rower, not at all. Averaged around 320 Watts for the hard intervals, around 50 to 75 for the 60 second breaks.
  • firef1y72firef1y72 Member Posts: 1,578 Member Member Posts: 1,578 Member
    Monday

    30min session with trainer, trx with the twist of on the minute burpees, starting at 1 going up to 16 (136 burpees)

    Shoulders - did my usual routine, but upped the weights and dropped the rep back down to 10. I'll be upping the reps each week until I'm back up to 15.

    Christmas elf challenge - 10 burpees, 10 press ups, 10 squats and 10 sit ups

    Circuits - yet more burpees.
  • nighthawk584nighthawk584 Member Posts: 1,944 Member Member Posts: 1,944 Member
    Mon 12/9: Full body weight training, 30 min spin bike.
  • drmwcdrmwc Member, Premium Posts: 451 Member Member, Premium Posts: 451 Member
    I went bouldering today for 90 minutes. It was good - I got a lot of routes. A lot had been reset. One slab wall had not been reset, and I got a long term project on it. Being slab, it was as scary as Hell on the reachy, balance move at the top.
    edited December 2019
  • Finafoshizzle93Finafoshizzle93 Member Posts: 151 Member Member Posts: 151 Member
    35 min elliptical

    30 min weight circuits:

    15 sumo squats with 20lb
    15 KB swings 20 lb
    15 dumbell deadlifts - 30 lb
    Repeat 3x

    18 squats
    30 mountain climbers on bosu ball
    16 jump squats
    Repeat 3x

    19 one leg bridge (each side)
    15 leg extension - 40 lb
    Repeat 3x

    1 min plank
    50 flutter kicks
    Repeat 2x
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Member, Premium Posts: 15,931 Member Member, Premium Posts: 15,931 Member
    9700 (even) C2 rowing meters, easy steady state, maxing at 143 bpm, top of Z3. 39 of 53 minutes Z3.

    @mtaratoot, I've spent a lot of time in a canoe over the years, but mostly flat water (it's what we have here), only a little mild class I/II in open boats. Late hubs and I used to canoe-camp most vacations, often Algonquin Provincial Park, 7-10 days. I lack his knowledge/skill for flat or white (he'd paddle rapids I'd portage - I don't love that. ;) ) - he grew up with it. I own a sea kayak & gear, but it's seen limited water time, truthfully. Rowing is my late-life true love. :)
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