Coronavirus prep

1465466468470471735

Replies

  • T1DCarnivoreRunner
    T1DCarnivoreRunner Posts: 11,468 Member
    SModa61 wrote: »
    I've seen plenty of articles about the questions healthcare workers must consider when they decide which patients they don't treat... which patients they are going to send home to die. That's not something I've seen before from any flu season.

    Curious. Do we know that those patients being sent home are being triaged in such a way that they are being sent home to die? Or could it be that they are the most mild cases? Or that it is just bad luck that they are arriving when no beds are available?

    The article I am thinking of... which was awhile ago, and probably wouldn't be able to find again, was about people sent home knowing they will die and they are in too bad of condition to even spend effort trying to save when the same effort could go towards 2, 3, or more other patients with likely better outcomes.
  • lemurcat2
    lemurcat2 Posts: 7,893 Member
    More on the vaccine and transmission (tldr: they don't know yet, they expect to know soon):

    https://talkingpointsmemo.com/news/we-still-need-an-answer-to-a-critical-question-do-covid-vaccines-prevent-transmission
  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 25,700 Member
    edited December 2020
    Nothing surprising here, but this is the US VA's plan for rolling out Pfizer vaccinations. (Well, I guess the fact that it's only going to initially be in 37 facilities nationwide is of note. There's an update to that in the second link.)

    https://www.va.gov/opa/pressrel/pressrelease.cfm?id=5580

    https://federalnewsnetwork.com/veterans-affairs/2020/12/va-warns-of-long-process-to-distribute-covid-19-vaccine-to-employees-and-veterans/

    “Can you handle the distribution, and then is that an adequate amount for the largest healthcare system in the nation?” Jon Tester (D-Mont.), ranking member of the Senate Veterans Affairs Committee, said Wednesday at a hearing on VA’s COVID-19 response.

    “It is not an adequate amount, and this will be a long process for us to reach all 7 million veterans who we believe will want vaccination from us, as well as all 400,000 employees of the agency,” Stone told the committee. “We do anticipate weekly distribution, and it remains to be seen how robust that weekly distribution will be.”

    ...As of Wednesday, 37 VA sites were equipped with the proper freezers needed to support the Pfizer vaccine. Stone said he’s expecting a shipment of another 36 freezers, meaning VA may eventually have a total of 73 sites that are equipped to receive an initial shipment of Pfizer vaccines, once it’s approved.
  • paperpudding
    paperpudding Posts: 7,698 Member
    UK has started vaccinating.

    From what I read, not for people under 16, pregnant women and people with severe allergies - but once supplies are sufficient, everyone else can have the vaccine.
    So far starting only with vulnerable aged.

  • SuzySunshine99
    SuzySunshine99 Posts: 2,766 Member
    Question for the Australia and New Zealand posters...

    With few to no cases, how do you feel personally about getting the vaccine as soon as you can? Will you get it as soon as it’s available to you, or will you wait?
  • TonyB0588
    TonyB0588 Posts: 9,520 Member
    This supports what we were all thinking, that it was in the US far before the first "documented" case..

    The virus that causes COVID-19 may have been in the US as early as mid-December 2019, a month before the first confirmed case, based on antibodies found in donated blood. Widespread community transmission likely did not occur until February 2020.

    https://bit.ly/36k3gzI.

    Intere
    This supports what we were all thinking, that it was in the US far before the first "documented" case..

    The virus that causes COVID-19 may have been in the US as early as mid-December 2019, a month before the first confirmed case, based on antibodies found in donated blood. Widespread community transmission likely did not occur until February 2020.

    https://bit.ly/36k3gzI.

    Interesting. I know two ladies in their 60s who had bad pneumonia in December 2019, long before the name COVID was given to the current disease. One of them says she noticed an unusual amount of emergency activity during the time she was in that private hospital then.
  • Fuzzipeg
    Fuzzipeg Posts: 2,258 Member
    Thankfully the people who were affected by the vaccine are well again now. These were people who had to carry eppi (sp?) pens, for their allergies/reactions so their reactions are stronger than often happens. I'm sure now the authorities are aware of the issue those who always have these pens to hand will be offered another product when one becomes available.

    Hearing a scientist yesterday, he was saying reactions happen to proteins and there are no proteins in this vaccine. Frome experience there could be reactions to something else in the product I suggest preservatives, some other vaccines contain antibiotics, though its possible its too small an amount for the vast majorities systems to notice.