Does fasted cardio burn more fat

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Replies

  • sflano1783
    sflano1783 Posts: 117 Member
    sflano1783 wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Calorie deficit for fat loss. That's all it takes.

    Well-designed strength training program, faithfully performed, plus good overall nutrition (especially but not exclusively enough protein) for muscle gain.

    Fat loss (especially if trying to keep/gain muscle at the same time) is slow. It won't show up as scale weight loss every day or even every week. Over many weeks, you'll know whether you're losing fat, by scale weight and by tape measurements or appearance.

    Muscle gain is even slower, especially if pursing fat loss at the same time. You'll see results in more like months to years.

    You keep coming back and asking us the same questions, mere days apart. You will not reliably see results in days. It takes longer. Much longer.

    If you don't believe what we're telling you, that's fine . . . but asking again is not going to draw out different answers. In particular, it's not going to draw out answers that are more like what you may want to hear. You're going to get answers that are what we believe, and what (for many of us) we've seen take place in our own lives.

    You've talked about wanting fat loss and muscle gain. For those goals:

    Eat at a small calorie deficit to lose fat slowly.
    Faithfully follow a good strength training program to gain muscle, which is going to be very slow.
    Get good overall nutrition (especially protein, but not just protein) to support muscle gain and health.
    Be patient. Very patient.

    Beyond that, do what works for you to stay full and happy, and keep things practical and affordable, because your routine needs to be sustainable. It's going to take months for noticeable overall progress, maybe even years to reach your personal ideals. Patience.

    I asking cause I haven't got answers to my diet plan I dunno what to eat for each meals and how many meals per day that will keep me from craving other foods etc

    Experiment with different macro ratios, timings and frequencies, as long as you remain in a calorie deficit, fat loss will happen, using your Food Notes section can be a good way to note days you had more or less hunger. Setting the names of your meals to time slots instead of Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, Snacks can also help you look back over meal timings and frequencies to review what has or hasn't worked. Bear in mind that if you're changing macros around you may see a gain on the scale, even if you're in a deficit, that is just water retention and it doesn't mean what you're doing isn't working.

    Cravings tend to happen more often when you make foods you like off limits, see if you can satisfy craving with smaller portions of those things or substitutions for them before considering cutting them altogether.

    For example if you like fries, obviously the kind you get from a fast food place are going to be pretty calorific because they are usually deep fried. The humble potato itself is not that calorific and has some pretty decent nutritional value, I make my own fries by tossing chipped potato in a couple of sprays of 1 cal oil spray and some seasoning and bake it for 30 mins.

    I use light Philadelphia cheese as a substitute for Ricotta or Cream when making gratins/lasagne, etc.

    I try not to keep large packs of snack foods in the house or if I do, I'll try to portion them out into small tubs of a 100-150cal serving. As I mentioned earlier upthread I made homemade chocolate cake, but the bulk of it was Beetroot (400g) and Eggs (4) and there was no butter or oil, very little sugar and only very dark chocolate in it it tasted delicious but was higher in Protein and Fibre than anything I would have bought at a shop.


    I didn't know I could change the name on the meals here on myfitnespal I'm learning something new
  • dragon_girl26
    dragon_girl26 Posts: 2,182 Member
    sflano1783 wrote: »
    Just had a wholemeal brown bread ham sandwich and cup of black tea lovely last meal of the day and fits into my calories for today

    Sounds like a perfect way to end the day! :)
  • sflano1783
    sflano1783 Posts: 117 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    OP, with apologies, that last post was a digression, on your thread: Off topic.

    This post, I think, is on topic. I'm going to point out a *very atypical* case. Oversimplifying, there's a guy who used to post here who started from an overweight/somewhat-undermuscled level.

    He worked out like a demon. That's important. Lots of lifting, good programs, etc., very challenging, very consistent. A hard worker. High daily activity level, moderate cardio. All of that, for literally years.

    He decided to experiment with eating "whatever", as long as he got overall good nutrition (even then, lower levels of protein than most of the bro-gym advice would recommend, but a minimally decent amount). I'm talking McMuffins, Froot Loops, onion rings, ice cream, pizza, etc.

    Remember, I said *Good Overall Nutrition*. But near-scary food choices, sometimes, to get it.

    He kept good records. Over the long haul, his weight loss worked out to be very, very close to what the CICO formula would predict. There was a great detailed thread here about his experience, but it sadly got deleted.

    There's a thread on another site about one of his cuts, during bulk and cut cycles, with details of his eating and activity. It's here, with a profile pic of what he looked like at the time:

    https://forum.bodybuilding.com/showthread.php?t=141807961&p=822484731#post822484731

    On MFP, last I looked there was still a before photo of him, way before this: Looks like a basic chubby-ish guy who maybe played sports in high school or something, but not remotely like a bodybuilder/serious athlete. The photo at the link is YEARS later. (Also, I have no idea whether he ever used dangerous, illegal drug for faster progress.)

    This is an example that suggests that very hard work and good nutrition will get you to pretty good levels, even without living on skinless chicken, broccoli, and rice full time.

    Am I recommending that you eat like that? NO. It's an extreme example. Kinda nutty.

    What matters is the hard work, good program, good overall nutrition, patience. Not eating schedule, not specific food choices.

    So he lost weight without counting macros just calories
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 25,217 Member
    sflano1783 wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    OP, with apologies, that last post was a digression, on your thread: Off topic.

    This post, I think, is on topic. I'm going to point out a *very atypical* case. Oversimplifying, there's a guy who used to post here who started from an overweight/somewhat-undermuscled level.

    He worked out like a demon. That's important. Lots of lifting, good programs, etc., very challenging, very consistent. A hard worker. High daily activity level, moderate cardio. All of that, for literally years.

    He decided to experiment with eating "whatever", as long as he got overall good nutrition (even then, lower levels of protein than most of the bro-gym advice would recommend, but a minimally decent amount). I'm talking McMuffins, Froot Loops, onion rings, ice cream, pizza, etc.

    Remember, I said *Good Overall Nutrition*. But near-scary food choices, sometimes, to get it.

    He kept good records. Over the long haul, his weight loss worked out to be very, very close to what the CICO formula would predict. There was a great detailed thread here about his experience, but it sadly got deleted.

    There's a thread on another site about one of his cuts, during bulk and cut cycles, with details of his eating and activity. It's here, with a profile pic of what he looked like at the time:

    https://forum.bodybuilding.com/showthread.php?t=141807961&p=822484731#post822484731

    On MFP, last I looked there was still a before photo of him, way before this: Looks like a basic chubby-ish guy who maybe played sports in high school or something, but not remotely like a bodybuilder/serious athlete. The photo at the link is YEARS later. (Also, I have no idea whether he ever used dangerous, illegal drug for faster progress.)

    This is an example that suggests that very hard work and good nutrition will get you to pretty good levels, even without living on skinless chicken, broccoli, and rice full time.

    Am I recommending that you eat like that? NO. It's an extreme example. Kinda nutty.

    What matters is the hard work, good program, good overall nutrition, patience. Not eating schedule, not specific food choices.

    So he lost weight without counting macros just calories

    No, not exactly.

    He was counting macros *and* calories, but not worrying too much about which foods he chose to get the macros. (For example, if he got his protein from a cheesy pepperoni pizza, that was fine with him, as long as it fit in his calories and let him still get other nutrition he wanted that day.)

    He did have a lower protein macro goal than many people recommend for bodybuilding, but he was pretty conscientious about hitting his own protein target.

    He lost weight, and gained lots of muscle. It took a really, really long time (years) to gain the muscle, and was a lot of work the whole time.
  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 25,695 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Ddsb11 wrote: »
    sflano1783 wrote: »
    Ddsb11 wrote: »
    sflano1783 wrote: »
    Just had a wholemeal brown bread ham sandwich and cup of black tea lovely last meal of the day and fits into my calories for today

    This is a promising post, like it’s sinking in a little. Believe me, it’s hard to unlearn all the myths and trends passed down to us.

    I’ll tell you what I did. I got a food scale to keep myself honest about how much I was actually eating, and logged everything with calories. I ate 1-2 meals a day because that felt most natural to me. I ate those meals when I wanted them. Some days I ate what sounded good, other days I ate for volume. I weighed myself consistently and followed the weight trend on an app so I could account for normal weight fluctuations. My point is, when and what we eat is individual and it really doesn’t matter if you’re getting proper nutrition.

    The advice here is correct, all you need is a deficit to lose weight. As long as you’re eating your calorie goal and getting in your protein, eat what, and as you wish, and log accurately. And seriously, back away from the bro science.

    Thanks for feed back my pt is being an *kitten* he's ignoring my messages to him so I think I'll just do it my own way from now on

    Look, he means well I’m sure. He’s likely just sharing the bad advice that was given to him. And because body builders look how they look it’s an easy assumption to believe they are right. The thing is, the science doesn’t back up their methodology, it just doesn’t. Their approach is a means to an end, but it’s an unnecessary one. Why cut out foods that will be part of your maintenance when you don’t have to? Your health and wellness is for life, and the key is eating in a way you can confidently do consistently. That way you are part of this community as a success story, instead of always finding yourself back at square 1. Personally I would just come up with a plan that works for me and keep it to myself.

    Very true. And true in other scenarios. I'm seeing a similar phenomenon now in another thread here, where someone figures that the training/diet advice from "Bob" must hold some magic because "Bob" achieved an amazing athletic goal (bodybuilding, very fast race pace, whatever, doesn't matter).

    People who have achieved results have great results. They may or may not have great methods, and their advice may or may not accurately represent their personal methods. Somewhere along the way, they've doubtless done some things right, but it's human nature to attribute causation to some method(s) that was coincidental to success.

    Science helps sort that stuff out. In my sport, I give more credence to great coaches (people who've trained many successful competitors, whether they were great competitors themselves or not) over the advice of competitors themselves. Think about it: In sports, not every great coach/trainer - as measured in success of their team or trainees - was a great competitor in the sport themselves. Even then, science is a reality test (and great coaches/trainers pay attention to science, IME.)

    Right, like the fact that Tom Brady never eats strawberries has NOTHING whatsoever to do with his success, nor does his gameday almond butter and jelly sandwich.
  • sflano1783
    sflano1783 Posts: 117 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    sflano1783 wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    OP, with apologies, that last post was a digression, on your thread: Off topic.

    This post, I think, is on topic. I'm going to point out a *very atypical* case. Oversimplifying, there's a guy who used to post here who started from an overweight/somewhat-undermuscled level.

    He worked out like a demon. That's important. Lots of lifting, good programs, etc., very challenging, very consistent. A hard worker. High daily activity level, moderate cardio. All of that, for literally years.

    He decided to experiment with eating "whatever", as long as he got overall good nutrition (even then, lower levels of protein than most of the bro-gym advice would recommend, but a minimally decent amount). I'm talking McMuffins, Froot Loops, onion rings, ice cream, pizza, etc.

    Remember, I said *Good Overall Nutrition*. But near-scary food choices, sometimes, to get it.

    He kept good records. Over the long haul, his weight loss worked out to be very, very close to what the CICO formula would predict. There was a great detailed thread here about his experience, but it sadly got deleted.

    There's a thread on another site about one of his cuts, during bulk and cut cycles, with details of his eating and activity. It's here, with a profile pic of what he looked like at the time:

    https://forum.bodybuilding.com/showthread.php?t=141807961&p=822484731#post822484731

    On MFP, last I looked there was still a before photo of him, way before this: Looks like a basic chubby-ish guy who maybe played sports in high school or something, but not remotely like a bodybuilder/serious athlete. The photo at the link is YEARS later. (Also, I have no idea whether he ever used dangerous, illegal drug for faster progress.)

    This is an example that suggests that very hard work and good nutrition will get you to pretty good levels, even without living on skinless chicken, broccoli, and rice full time.

    Am I recommending that you eat like that? NO. It's an extreme example. Kinda nutty.

    What matters is the hard work, good program, good overall nutrition, patience. Not eating schedule, not specific food choices.

    So he lost weight without counting macros just calories

    No, not exactly.

    He was counting macros *and* calories, but not worrying too much about which foods he chose to get the macros. (For example, if he got his protein from a cheesy pepperoni pizza, that was fine with him, as long as it fit in his calories and let him still get other nutrition he wanted that day.)

    He did have a lower protein macro goal than many people recommend for bodybuilding, but he was pretty conscientious about hitting his own protein target.

    He lost weight, and gained lots of muscle. It took a really, really long time (years) to gain the muscle, and was a lot of work the whole time.

    OK
  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 46,318 Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Ddsb11 wrote: »
    sflano1783 wrote: »
    Ddsb11 wrote: »
    sflano1783 wrote: »
    Just had a wholemeal brown bread ham sandwich and cup of black tea lovely last meal of the day and fits into my calories for today

    This is a promising post, like it’s sinking in a little. Believe me, it’s hard to unlearn all the myths and trends passed down to us.

    I’ll tell you what I did. I got a food scale to keep myself honest about how much I was actually eating, and logged everything with calories. I ate 1-2 meals a day because that felt most natural to me. I ate those meals when I wanted them. Some days I ate what sounded good, other days I ate for volume. I weighed myself consistently and followed the weight trend on an app so I could account for normal weight fluctuations. My point is, when and what we eat is individual and it really doesn’t matter if you’re getting proper nutrition.

    The advice here is correct, all you need is a deficit to lose weight. As long as you’re eating your calorie goal and getting in your protein, eat what, and as you wish, and log accurately. And seriously, back away from the bro science.

    Thanks for feed back my pt is being an *kitten* he's ignoring my messages to him so I think I'll just do it my own way from now on

    Look, he means well I’m sure. He’s likely just sharing the bad advice that was given to him. And because body builders look how they look it’s an easy assumption to believe they are right. The thing is, the science doesn’t back up their methodology, it just doesn’t. Their approach is a means to an end, but it’s an unnecessary one. Why cut out foods that will be part of your maintenance when you don’t have to? Your health and wellness is for life, and the key is eating in a way you can confidently do consistently. That way you are part of this community as a success story, instead of always finding yourself back at square 1. Personally I would just come up with a plan that works for me and keep it to myself.

    Very true. And true in other scenarios. I'm seeing a similar phenomenon now in another thread here, where someone figures that the training/diet advice from "Bob" must hold some magic because "Bob" achieved an amazing athletic goal (bodybuilding, very fast race pace, whatever, doesn't matter).

    People who have achieved results have great results. They may or may not have great methods, and their advice may or may not accurately represent their personal methods. Somewhere along the way, they've doubtless done some things right, but it's human nature to attribute causation to some method(s) that was coincidental to success.

    Science helps sort that stuff out. In my sport, I give more credence to great coaches (people who've trained many successful competitors, whether they were great competitors themselves or not) over the advice of competitors themselves. Think about it: In sports, not every great coach/trainer - as measured in success of their team or trainees - was a great competitor in the sport themselves. Even then, science is a reality test (and great coaches/trainers pay attention to science, IME.)

    Right, like the fact that Tom Brady never eats strawberries has NOTHING whatsoever to do with his success, nor does his gameday almond butter and jelly sandwich.
    Brady is vegetarian right?

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

  • yirara
    yirara Posts: 7,378 Member
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    technically it should because you will be pulling from the fat for energy instead of calories already taken in and stored sugar. your body will have already burned through the stored sugar and such just leaving you burning from the fat
    Total depletion of glycogen is RARE. While there are some that have and PAID for it (Triathletes running on fumes then hitting the ground because they burned through all their stores), the body doesn't break down fat that quickly for energy to move voluntary muscle without a major crash. And the majority of even fasted people (myself included) don't hit that apex.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    Yep, true. I do, but for some reason can't access energy stores properly, and hence I crash, bonk, hit the wall, whatever you prefer. I can walk a maximum of 2 hours without food, run maaaybe 90 minutes at walking pace (last 20 minutes are agony). And I can't exercise at all fasted. But that's something unusual, and it's currently being investigated. If you think you have something like that: I also occasionally get lactic acidoses if I exercise too hard.
  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 46,318 Member
    yirara wrote: »
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    technically it should because you will be pulling from the fat for energy instead of calories already taken in and stored sugar. your body will have already burned through the stored sugar and such just leaving you burning from the fat
    Total depletion of glycogen is RARE. While there are some that have and PAID for it (Triathletes running on fumes then hitting the ground because they burned through all their stores), the body doesn't break down fat that quickly for energy to move voluntary muscle without a major crash. And the majority of even fasted people (myself included) don't hit that apex.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    Yep, true. I do, but for some reason can't access energy stores properly, and hence I crash, bonk, hit the wall, whatever you prefer. I can walk a maximum of 2 hours without food, run maaaybe 90 minutes at walking pace (last 20 minutes are agony). And I can't exercise at all fasted. But that's something unusual, and it's currently being investigated. If you think you have something like that: I also occasionally get lactic acidoses if I exercise too hard.
    Maybe try adding some beta alanine to supplement your workouts. It's a buffer to help reduce lactic acid build up.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

  • janejellyroll
    janejellyroll Posts: 25,878 Member
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Ddsb11 wrote: »
    sflano1783 wrote: »
    Ddsb11 wrote: »
    sflano1783 wrote: »
    Just had a wholemeal brown bread ham sandwich and cup of black tea lovely last meal of the day and fits into my calories for today

    This is a promising post, like it’s sinking in a little. Believe me, it’s hard to unlearn all the myths and trends passed down to us.

    I’ll tell you what I did. I got a food scale to keep myself honest about how much I was actually eating, and logged everything with calories. I ate 1-2 meals a day because that felt most natural to me. I ate those meals when I wanted them. Some days I ate what sounded good, other days I ate for volume. I weighed myself consistently and followed the weight trend on an app so I could account for normal weight fluctuations. My point is, when and what we eat is individual and it really doesn’t matter if you’re getting proper nutrition.

    The advice here is correct, all you need is a deficit to lose weight. As long as you’re eating your calorie goal and getting in your protein, eat what, and as you wish, and log accurately. And seriously, back away from the bro science.

    Thanks for feed back my pt is being an *kitten* he's ignoring my messages to him so I think I'll just do it my own way from now on

    Look, he means well I’m sure. He’s likely just sharing the bad advice that was given to him. And because body builders look how they look it’s an easy assumption to believe they are right. The thing is, the science doesn’t back up their methodology, it just doesn’t. Their approach is a means to an end, but it’s an unnecessary one. Why cut out foods that will be part of your maintenance when you don’t have to? Your health and wellness is for life, and the key is eating in a way you can confidently do consistently. That way you are part of this community as a success story, instead of always finding yourself back at square 1. Personally I would just come up with a plan that works for me and keep it to myself.

    Very true. And true in other scenarios. I'm seeing a similar phenomenon now in another thread here, where someone figures that the training/diet advice from "Bob" must hold some magic because "Bob" achieved an amazing athletic goal (bodybuilding, very fast race pace, whatever, doesn't matter).

    People who have achieved results have great results. They may or may not have great methods, and their advice may or may not accurately represent their personal methods. Somewhere along the way, they've doubtless done some things right, but it's human nature to attribute causation to some method(s) that was coincidental to success.

    Science helps sort that stuff out. In my sport, I give more credence to great coaches (people who've trained many successful competitors, whether they were great competitors themselves or not) over the advice of competitors themselves. Think about it: In sports, not every great coach/trainer - as measured in success of their team or trainees - was a great competitor in the sport themselves. Even then, science is a reality test (and great coaches/trainers pay attention to science, IME.)

    Right, like the fact that Tom Brady never eats strawberries has NOTHING whatsoever to do with his success, nor does his gameday almond butter and jelly sandwich.
    Brady is vegetarian right?

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    No, he eats fish and chicken. And he's said if he wants bacon, then he has some. He does eat a lot of vegetables though -- reportedly about 80% of his diet is vegetables.

    https://www.menshealth.com/nutrition/a19535249/tom-brady-reveals-insane-diet-in-new-book/
  • yirara
    yirara Posts: 7,378 Member
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    yirara wrote: »
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    technically it should because you will be pulling from the fat for energy instead of calories already taken in and stored sugar. your body will have already burned through the stored sugar and such just leaving you burning from the fat
    Total depletion of glycogen is RARE. While there are some that have and PAID for it (Triathletes running on fumes then hitting the ground because they burned through all their stores), the body doesn't break down fat that quickly for energy to move voluntary muscle without a major crash. And the majority of even fasted people (myself included) don't hit that apex.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    Yep, true. I do, but for some reason can't access energy stores properly, and hence I crash, bonk, hit the wall, whatever you prefer. I can walk a maximum of 2 hours without food, run maaaybe 90 minutes at walking pace (last 20 minutes are agony). And I can't exercise at all fasted. But that's something unusual, and it's currently being investigated. If you think you have something like that: I also occasionally get lactic acidoses if I exercise too hard.
    Maybe try adding some beta alanine to supplement your workouts. It's a buffer to help reduce lactic acid build up.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png


    Yep, once I know what the reason is, and which type of lactic acid. Then I can try and few things and see what works.
  • JustaJoe00
    JustaJoe00 Posts: 776 Member
    good read and responses. i had the idea also that you'd burn more fat after fasting. no matter to me, but i do know that i feel better working out after not eating for 8-12 hours. It took me many years to realize working out in the evening after work and lunch etc. that i just didn't feel great versus working out in the morning.
  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 46,318 Member
    JustaJoe00 wrote: »
    good read and responses. i had the idea also that you'd burn more fat after fasting. no matter to me, but i do know that i feel better working out after not eating for 8-12 hours. It took me many years to realize working out in the evening after work and lunch etc. that i just didn't feel great versus working out in the morning.
    There so many out there that put out analogies without taking into consideration that the body doesn't quite workout and some logic would dictate. If it were true, once we identify what could be harming the body, we should easily find the fix. And yet things like cancer exist because though on paper the cure should work, the body doesn't react to the cure the same way.
    One of the analogies I usually hate is the "car engine" one where they speak of fuel and how it relates to weight loss and how the car runs on premium fuel versus cheap fuel. Hello, our body ISN'T a car engine nor does it run like it.


    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png
  • tinkerbellang83
    tinkerbellang83 Posts: 9,058 Member
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    JustaJoe00 wrote: »
    good read and responses. i had the idea also that you'd burn more fat after fasting. no matter to me, but i do know that i feel better working out after not eating for 8-12 hours. It took me many years to realize working out in the evening after work and lunch etc. that i just didn't feel great versus working out in the morning.
    There so many out there that put out analogies without taking into consideration that the body doesn't quite workout and some logic would dictate. If it were true, once we identify what could be harming the body, we should easily find the fix. And yet things like cancer exist because though on paper the cure should work, the body doesn't react to the cure the same way.
    One of the analogies I usually hate is the "car engine" one where they speak of fuel and how it relates to weight loss and how the car runs on premium fuel versus cheap fuel. Hello, our body ISN'T a car engine nor does it run like it.


    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    You'll love the one I posted earlier then, all about engines 😂😂