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Does your doctor comment on your weight?

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  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Member Posts: 7,556 Member Member Posts: 7,556 Member
    lokihen wrote: »
    I saw my doctor today and was disappointed that he didn't mention my weight. I've lost 30+ pounds since my last appointment. Although I did get a 'good for you' for exercising. Lol

    I normally don't pay attention to BMI so it was nice to see I've dropped out of Stage 3 obesity and am firmly in Stage 2. Another 25 pounds will put me in Stage 1. That's a good goal.

    Yay!
  • LGreenfield7LGreenfield7 Member Posts: 75 Member Member Posts: 75 Member
    When I got hired for my job, I had to have a physical done. The doctor that was performing the physical said that I was 2.2 LBS away from being what he considers overweight. I am 5'6" and was 130 lbs at the time. I also had a very low body fat. I don't know if there is something that i am missing when it comes to what classifies as overweight but i did not consider myself such. I have recently bulked up to 175. I am still only around 16% bodyfat but i do feel the affects of being heavier. Is there a reason that the doctors standard always feels so much lower than mine% is it because i spend to much time in the "bodybuilding" community?
  • SuzySunshine99SuzySunshine99 Member Posts: 2,448 Member Member Posts: 2,448 Member
    I recently had my first doctor's appointment in over two years. I was wondering if she was going to "yell" at me about missing last year's physical, but instead, the first thing she said was "I'm so glad you maintained your weight!" She said most of her returning patients that she hadn't seen in a while had put on some pandemic weight.

    My doctor is way more interested in my exercise routine than my diet. She always asks about, and stresses the importance of, weight and resistance training. I think she sees too many older women with poor bone health and no muscle mass. She's starting to give me the "At your age...." advice. :D
  • autobahn66autobahn66 Member, Premium Posts: 39 Member Member, Premium Posts: 39 Member
    When I got hired for my job, I had to have a physical done. The doctor that was performing the physical said that I was 2.2 LBS away from being what he considers overweight. I am 5'6" and was 130 lbs at the time. I also had a very low body fat. I don't know if there is something that i am missing when it comes to what classifies as overweight but i did not consider myself such. I have recently bulked up to 175. I am still only around 16% bodyfat but i do feel the affects of being heavier. Is there a reason that the doctors standard always feels so much lower than mine% is it because i spend to much time in the "bodybuilding" community?

    A doctor doing a routine company physical has a box to tick: BMI normal, overweight, obese. They may be paid or contracted based on giving dietary or weight related advice. Those few words are enough for the doc to write down: "Discussed weight, noted BMI in normal range but close to overweight category." The issue is that BMI is a gross calculation that is useful on a population level and sometimes for an individual to track weight over time, and as a screening tool. As a tool for determining an individual's actual health though, it has significant limitations.


    As for lower standards? A decent majority of people a doctor sees are overweight or obese, and I would venture most to far less than the recommended level of physical activity. So when confronted with someone who is generally around the upper limit of a normal BMI, who clearly exercises, their input is limited. They are going for the low hanging fruit of encouraging a person who does nothing to do literally anything active...
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Member Posts: 7,556 Member Member Posts: 7,556 Member
    When I got hired for my job, I had to have a physical done. The doctor that was performing the physical said that I was 2.2 LBS away from being what he considers overweight. I am 5'6" and was 130 lbs at the time. I also had a very low body fat.

    That's truly insane. I would have questioned why he thought that, and what his understanding of a healthy weight was based on. (It's not BMI, as 130 and 5'6 is 21. Nor is it because he's not a bodybuilder, as I don't think only bodybuilders would consider someone 5'6, 130, and with a low BF% to NOT be near overweight.)
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Member Posts: 7,556 Member Member Posts: 7,556 Member
    autobahn66 wrote: »
    When I got hired for my job, I had to have a physical done. The doctor that was performing the physical said that I was 2.2 LBS away from being what he considers overweight. I am 5'6" and was 130 lbs at the time. I also had a very low body fat. I don't know if there is something that i am missing when it comes to what classifies as overweight but i did not consider myself such. I have recently bulked up to 175. I am still only around 16% bodyfat but i do feel the affects of being heavier. Is there a reason that the doctors standard always feels so much lower than mine% is it because i spend to much time in the "bodybuilding" community?

    A doctor doing a routine company physical has a box to tick: BMI normal, overweight, obese. They may be paid or contracted based on giving dietary or weight related advice. Those few words are enough for the doc to write down: "Discussed weight, noted BMI in normal range but close to overweight category." The issue is that BMI is a gross calculation that is useful on a population level and sometimes for an individual to track weight over time, and as a screening tool. As a tool for determining an individual's actual health though, it has significant limitations.


    As for lower standards? A decent majority of people a doctor sees are overweight or obese, and I would venture most to far less than the recommended level of physical activity. So when confronted with someone who is generally around the upper limit of a normal BMI, who clearly exercises, their input is limited. They are going for the low hanging fruit of encouraging a person who does nothing to do literally anything active...

    Just for the record, I think this is way too much of a generalization about doctors. A doctor who relied on assumptions like that and didn't have an actual conversation and assessment about fitness is IMO a bad doctor. Also, it can't be just relying on BMI, since the BMI was nowhere near overweight. If the doctor was used to dealing with overweight/obese and inactive people (which seems likely enough), they should be immediately able to see the difference.
  • autobahn66autobahn66 Member, Premium Posts: 39 Member Member, Premium Posts: 39 Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    autobahn66 wrote: »
    When I got hired for my job, I had to have a physical done. The doctor that was performing the physical said that I was 2.2 LBS away from being what he considers overweight. I am 5'6" and was 130 lbs at the time. I also had a very low body fat. I don't know if there is something that i am missing when it comes to what classifies as overweight but i did not consider myself such. I have recently bulked up to 175. I am still only around 16% bodyfat but i do feel the affects of being heavier. Is there a reason that the doctors standard always feels so much lower than mine% is it because i spend to much time in the "bodybuilding" community?

    A doctor doing a routine company physical has a box to tick: BMI normal, overweight, obese. They may be paid or contracted based on giving dietary or weight related advice. Those few words are enough for the doc to write down: "Discussed weight, noted BMI in normal range but close to overweight category." The issue is that BMI is a gross calculation that is useful on a population level and sometimes for an individual to track weight over time, and as a screening tool. As a tool for determining an individual's actual health though, it has significant limitations.


    As for lower standards? A decent majority of people a doctor sees are overweight or obese, and I would venture most to far less than the recommended level of physical activity. So when confronted with someone who is generally around the upper limit of a normal BMI, who clearly exercises, their input is limited. They are going for the low hanging fruit of encouraging a person who does nothing to do literally anything active...

    Just for the record, I think this is way too much of a generalization about doctors. A doctor who relied on assumptions like that and didn't have an actual conversation and assessment about fitness is IMO a bad doctor. Also, it can't be just relying on BMI, since the BMI was nowhere near overweight. If the doctor was used to dealing with overweight/obese and inactive people (which seems likely enough), they should be immediately able to see the difference.

    I'll be honest: I didn't redo the calculation myself and I work in cm and kg, so didn't catch the the calculation was out!

    But as to the second part: it depends very much on the specific role of the doctor. A full evaluation of diet and fitness takes way more than even a single appointment. It takes anthropometric and functional tests. Review appointments to assess food diaries and weight change over time. It is a massive investment of time for a doctor (which is why most of these things are done by dieticians or nurses in a multidisciplinary appointment)

    This will happen in a weight management clinic, definitely should happen in metabolic/diabetes clinics and would be of great benefit in a general clinic. But the reality is, unless you are specifically there to discuss weight management, at least in the part of the world I am, there is virtually no chance of a full and proper assessment of weight or weight management. I guess YMMV depending on location and other factors, but the reality is that a doctor who is not being paid to specifically care about your weight and activity levels probably just wants to know where you fall on a BMI chart and whether you do 30 mins of activity every day. And even if you are overweight or obese, or completely inactive, the intervention that will be offered is almost certainly going to be "lose weight, do more activity".

  • claireychn074claireychn074 Member, Premium Posts: 565 Member Member, Premium Posts: 565 Member
    @lemurcat2 i think it depends on where you’re based. In the UK doctors (GPs) have on average 10 mins per person, and they need c3mins to write up notes so you basically get 7 mins to discuss issues. I get weighed regularly owing to endocrine issues and they will always go through the “BMI tick box”. I did have a v short conversation when I’d put on nearly 2kgs over one year but they usually just want to move onto other stuff. It’s not ideal, but the NHS is massively overstretched. I rarely get asked about my exercise or diet as they just don’t have time 🤷‍♂️
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Member Posts: 7,556 Member Member Posts: 7,556 Member
    autobahn66 wrote: »
    But as to the second part: it depends very much on the specific role of the doctor. A full evaluation of diet and fitness takes way more than even a single appointment. It takes anthropometric and functional tests. Review appointments to assess food diaries and weight change over time. It is a massive investment of time for a doctor (which is why most of these things are done by dieticians or nurses in a multidisciplinary appointment)

    It really doesn't (and I would expect a referral to a dietitian if that kind of diet evaluation was needed or if I'd wanted weight loss help).

    Example of what my doctor does is in the thread already, but I'll repeat. Doctor: technically you are a bit over the healthy BMI (I was around 26.5) but seem fit, your blood pressure is good, tests are good (I forget what the doctor had at that point, but also I got other usual tests that were reported later) so it's probably not an issue. How's your diet/exercise? Me: training for a half marathon, and I know I'm a bit over, I'm actually losing weight right now, blah, blah on general diet. Doctor: what's your goal weight and process for losing? (Checking to make sure I wasn't crash dieting or have an unreasonable goal, I assume.) Me: 120, I'm just using MFP, losing about a lb/week. Doctor: that seems great, not too aggressive, that's a healthy weight for you. This was overall a super short conversation.

    If I'd thought BMI was not reflective of my actual risk due to BF% or waist to height (which my doctor was already ready to believe), I would have expected her to maybe do the waist measurement as a backup.
    edited July 27
  • glassyoglassyo Member Posts: 5,688 Member Member Posts: 5,688 Member
    Awwwww my post got delete. Probably for the best because I did end up with low key posters remorse but do you know how long it took to write that??? How I salivated all over my tablet remembering the good old days? 😀
  • paperpuddingpaperpudding Member Posts: 7,043 Member Member Posts: 7,043 Member
    autobahn66 wrote: »
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    autobahn66 wrote: »
    When I got hired for my job, I had to have a physical done. The doctor that was performing the physical said that I was 2.2 LBS away from being what he considers overweight. I am 5'6" and was 130 lbs at the time. I also had a very low body fat. I don't know if there is something that i am missing when it comes to what classifies as overweight but i did not consider myself such. I have recently bulked up to 175. I am still only around 16% bodyfat but i do feel the affects of being heavier. Is there a reason that the doctors standard always feels so much lower than mine% is it because i spend to much time in the "bodybuilding" community?

    A doctor doing a routine company physical has a box to tick: BMI normal, overweight, obese. They may be paid or contracted based on giving dietary or weight related advice. Those few words are enough for the doc to write down: "Discussed weight, noted BMI in normal range but close to overweight category." The issue is that BMI is a gross calculation that is useful on a population level and sometimes for an individual to track weight over time, and as a screening tool. As a tool for determining an individual's actual health though, it has significant limitations.


    As for lower standards? A decent majority of people a doctor sees are overweight or obese, and I would venture most to far less than the recommended level of physical activity. So when confronted with someone who is generally around the upper limit of a normal BMI, who clearly exercises, their input is limited. They are going for the low hanging fruit of encouraging a person who does nothing to do literally anything active...

    Just for the record, I think this is way too much of a generalization about doctors. A doctor who relied on assumptions like that and didn't have an actual conversation and assessment about fitness is IMO a bad doctor. Also, it can't be just relying on BMI, since the BMI was nowhere near overweight. If the doctor was used to dealing with overweight/obese and inactive people (which seems likely enough), they should be immediately able to see the difference.

    I'll be honest: I didn't redo the calculation myself and I work in cm and kg, so didn't catch the the calculation was out!

    But as to the second part: it depends very much on the specific role of the doctor. A full evaluation of diet and fitness takes way more than even a single appointment. It takes anthropometric and functional tests. Review appointments to assess food diaries and weight change over time. It is a massive investment of time for a doctor (which is why most of these things are done by dieticians or nurses in a multidisciplinary appointment)

    This will happen in a weight management clinic, definitely should happen in metabolic/diabetes clinics and would be of great benefit in a general clinic. But the reality is, unless you are specifically there to discuss weight management, at least in the part of the world I am, there is virtually no chance of a full and proper assessment of weight or weight management. I guess YMMV depending on location and other factors, but the reality is that a doctor who is not being paid to specifically care about your weight and activity levels probably just wants to know where you fall on a BMI chart and whether you do 30 mins of activity every day. And even if you are overweight or obese, or completely inactive, the intervention that will be offered is almost certainly going to be "lose weight, do more activity".


    there seems a bit of confusion here - the poster you quoted was getting a pre employment medical - of course the doctor wasn't going to discuss weight management in detail or do a referral or anything else , he/sh e isnt even the patient's treating doctor, it is a company paid pre employment assessment, not a medical consultation

    How/why the doctor made a comment about poster being overweight is unclear - certainly nothing to do with 'healthy but over the upper BMI limit" - if her BMI was 21 :*

  • LGreenfield7LGreenfield7 Member Posts: 75 Member Member Posts: 75 Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    autobahn66 wrote: »
    When I got hired for my job, I had to have a physical done. The doctor that was performing the physical said that I was 2.2 LBS away from being what he considers overweight. I am 5'6" and was 130 lbs at the time. I also had a very low body fat. I don't know if there is something that i am missing when it comes to what classifies as overweight but i did not consider myself such. I have recently bulked up to 175. I am still only around 16% bodyfat but i do feel the affects of being heavier. Is there a reason that the doctors standard always feels so much lower than mine% is it because i spend to much time in the "bodybuilding" community?

    A doctor doing a routine company physical has a box to tick: BMI normal, overweight, obese. They may be paid or contracted based on giving dietary or weight related advice. Those few words are enough for the doc to write down: "Discussed weight, noted BMI in normal range but close to overweight category." The issue is that BMI is a gross calculation that is useful on a population level and sometimes for an individual to track weight over time, and as a screening tool. As a tool for determining an individual's actual health though, it has significant limitations.


    As for lower standards? A decent majority of people a doctor sees are overweight or obese, and I would venture most to far less than the recommended level of physical activity. So when confronted with someone who is generally around the upper limit of a normal BMI, who clearly exercises, their input is limited. They are going for the low hanging fruit of encouraging a person who does nothing to do literally anything active...

    Just for the record, I think this is way too much of a generalization about doctors. A doctor who relied on assumptions like that and didn't have an actual conversation and assessment about fitness is IMO a bad doctor. Also, it can't be just relying on BMI, since the BMI was nowhere near overweight. If the doctor was used to dealing with overweight/obese and inactive people (which seems likely enough), they should be immediately able to see the difference.

    I found the doctors comments interesting. My Physio therapist always told me that I looked incredibly healthy around 130 and that he was jealous. While donating blood the nurses would always suggest that I put on a little more bodyfat due to the fact that I had veins very close to the surface and it would make hitting the vein difficult. I wonder if he had to come up with something to note for my employer. I was a swimmer so my lung health was phenomenal, I had recently had laser eye surgery so sight couldn't have been a problem, and I hear well beyond the average person. IF this is the case.... is this really the level of politics that are involved in our workplaces and medical fields... Curious as to how you guys all feel.
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