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What are your unpopular opinions about health / fitness?

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Replies

  • amusedmonkey
    amusedmonkey Posts: 10,331 Member
    Sincere question here:

    How much diet soda is considered to be too much diet soda? Meaning how much at one time or how much per day is considered to be unhealthy?

    There is no "too much" established specifically for diet soda, but here is a rough list of what would be considered "too much" depending on the type and amount of sweetener used:
    Acesulfame potassium (Ace-K)

    Brand names Sunett® and Sweet One®
    ~200x sweeter than table sugar and is often combined with other sweeteners
    ADI: is 15 (mg/kg bw/d), or about 165 packets

    Advantame

    ~20,000x sweeter than table sugar (sucrose)
    ADI: is 32.8 (mg/kg bw/d), or about 4,000 packets per day

    Aspartame

    Brand names include Nutrasweet®, Equal®, and Sugar Twin®
    ~ 200x sweeter than table sugar
    Does contain calories but due to sweetness consumers are likely to use much less of it. It is the only approved nutritive sugar-substitute because it contains more than 2% of the calories in the equivalent amount of sugar.
    People who have a genetic disorder called Phenylketonuria (PKU) should avoid or restrict aspartame because they have problems metabolizing phenylalanine. Labels must include a statement to inform if a product contains phenylketonurics/phenylalanine.
    ADI: is 50 (mg/kg bw/d), or about 165 packets per day

    Neotame

    Brand name Newtame®
    ~ 7,000 to 13,000x sweeter than table sugar
    ADI: is .3 (mg/kg bw/d), or about 200 packets per day

    Saccharin

    Brand names include Sweet and Low®, Sweet Twin®, Sweet'N Low®, and Necta Sweet®
    ~200-700x sweeter than table sugar
    ADI: is 15 (mg/kg bw/d), or about 250 packets per day

    Sucralose

    Brand name Splenda®
    ~600x sweeter than table sugar
    ADI: is 5 (mg/kg bw/d), or about 165 packets per day


    Another popular high-intensity sweetener is made from the Stevia plant. The Steviol Glycosides obtained from the leaves of this plant are very sweet and have been submitted to the FDA to become a GRAS.

    Stevia/high purity steviol glycosides

    Brand names include Truvia®, PureVia®, Enliten®
    ~200-400x sweeter than table sugar
    Although not yet determined by the FDA, the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) ADI is 4(mg/kg bw/d), or about 29 packets

    @amusedmonkey

    Thank you.

    I drink diet 7up in 250 ml cans. I just looked at the can and it does list an upper limit for this specific drink. It lists two ingredients with an upper limit: Aspartame (81 mg per can and 40mg/kg/d limit) and Acesulfame K (21 mg per can and a 15mg/kg/day limit). Rounding down to 80 kg for ease I would need to drink 40 cans a day to reach the limit. That's 10 liters of liquid a day. Water toxicity is more of a concern at that point.

    It's interesting, though. Check your favorite drink and you may notice a similar recommended upper limit.
  • estherdragonbat
    estherdragonbat Posts: 5,285 Member
    ndj1979 wrote: »
    drinking a diet coke right now, am I going to die or have a heart attack?

    I'd guess that at some point within the next century or so, either possibility seems likely...
  • VintageFeline
    VintageFeline Posts: 6,771 Member
    I don't drink much soda at all, I'm more of a water flavourer sort myself (current weapon of choice is Vimto) but both would be sugar free/no added sugar. Why? I actually prefer the flavour for the most part. Full fat Coke makes my teeth furry and I don't like it. Often if going to McDs or similar I'll ask for water or even coffee with my meal deal. No that eating there is regular either.

    You see, I got fat eating too much of the things I like, it just so happens the drinks I like aren't really calorific so their impact was minimal. Now slow roast lamb in an anchovy garlic marinade/paste? I would say that was a large contributing factor to my large rear.
  • estherdragonbat
    estherdragonbat Posts: 5,285 Member
    Ruatine wrote: »
    ndj1979 wrote: »
    drinking a diet coke right now, am I going to die or have a heart attack?

    Diet coke is garbage













    You should be drinking coke zero instead

    Coke zero is garbage













    You should be drinking diet dr pepper instead :wink:

    Agreed or cherry diet Dr Pepper.

    Or Cherry Coke Zero
  • earlnabby
    earlnabby Posts: 8,177 Member
    earlnabby wrote: »
    Andy10725 wrote: »
    Andy10725 wrote: »
    Andy10725 wrote: »
    Andy10725 wrote: »
    I don't believe in diet version of drinks. It's just as bad if not more harmful. Putting that on food diary to attempt to keep cal count low is just fooling yourself. Same goes for sugar substitutes. Just man up and consume the real thing, it's not the end of the world.

    How is it more harmful? Why can't I spend those calories on something else? Or do you not believe that they're actually 0 calorie and that the manufacturers are lying and getting away with it?
    Exactly the reason for my respond above. I believe the stuff you eat matters to the organ. Sure it's 0 cal, but if u have too much of it, what would happen to ur organs? We all enjoy a little junk here n there from time to time. But when u r consuming something bad and not being aware or alert of it, that'd be troublesome.

    You keep dancing around the question. WHAT is bad about it.
    Didn't dance around anything. My biggest concern with it is over-consuming it without knowing you are having too much of it compared with how you would react to regular counterpart.
    But to name other, diabetes, heart disease.

    There is no sugar in, wait for it, sugar free drinks so how on earth can it impact/cause/exacerbate or whatever, diabetes?

    Same goes for heart disease, where on earth have you seen a study that shows this link?

    There is no evidence (not fear mongering blogs or websites) to indicate there is anything wrong with the consumption of diet drinks and any potential issues (so far only observed in mice as far as I'm aware) would call for drinking amounts that would cause far worse problems long before the side effects of the diet drink kicked in.

    Oy vey.
    Here: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11606-011-1968-2

    When I was a server I noticed a common phenomenon. People who are really overweight often order diet soft drinks. I don't know if it is a misplaced attempt at doing the right thing or if it is some kind of cognitive dissonance, because they would then go on to order potato skins with cheese/bacon/sour cream, ribs and fries and to top it off a mudslide sundae. With a refill of diet soda.

    Vascular events would definitely be part of their diet program - if I were to guess.

    "It’s because people make false correlations. People who drink calorie-free drinks tend to fall for the Health Halo of Food effect: they assume because they’re drinking zero-calorie drinks they can eat more food. This leads them to consume a greater number of calories and gaining more weight (and fat). People then make a faulty correlation between the two: “Diet drinks cause weight gain”, instead of, “People end up eating more calories leading them to gain more weight”." (Quoted from this article: http://physiqonomics.com/aspartame/ )

    That is sometimes true I'm sure, but I think just as often they simply know they are fat and are cutting calories where they can. They know they aren't going to give up the burger or fries so they cut a couple hundred calories from the meal via their drink.

    It happens enough that the phenomenon has a name so it is more than "sometimes".
  • Chef_Barbell
    Chef_Barbell Posts: 6,647 Member
    Ruatine wrote: »
    ndj1979 wrote: »
    drinking a diet coke right now, am I going to die or have a heart attack?

    Diet coke is garbage













    You should be drinking coke zero instead

    Coke zero is garbage













    You should be drinking diet dr pepper instead :wink:

    Agreed or cherry diet Dr Pepper.

    Or Cherry Coke Zero

    Diet Cheerwine is pretty good too.
  • earlnabby
    earlnabby Posts: 8,177 Member
    I don't drink much soda at all, I'm more of a water flavourer sort myself (current weapon of choice is Vimto) but both would be sugar free/no added sugar. Why? I actually prefer the flavour for the most part. Full fat Coke makes my teeth furry and I don't like it. Often if going to McDs or similar I'll ask for water or even coffee with my meal deal. No that eating there is regular either.

    You see, I got fat eating too much of the things I like, it just so happens the drinks I like aren't really calorific so their impact was minimal. Now slow roast lamb in an anchovy garlic marinade/paste? I would say that was a large contributing factor to my large rear.

    Mmmmmmmm, Vimto. Really hard to get in the States. Ribena Blackcurrant is even more impossible to find.
  • mph323
    mph323 Posts: 3,566 Member
    Sincere question here:

    How much diet soda is considered to be too much diet soda? Meaning how much at one time or how much per day is considered to be unhealthy?

    There is no "too much" established specifically for diet soda, but here is a rough list of what would be considered "too much" depending on the type and amount of sweetener used:
    Acesulfame potassium (Ace-K)

    Brand names Sunett® and Sweet One®
    ~200x sweeter than table sugar and is often combined with other sweeteners
    ADI: is 15 (mg/kg bw/d), or about 165 packets

    Advantame

    ~20,000x sweeter than table sugar (sucrose)
    ADI: is 32.8 (mg/kg bw/d), or about 4,000 packets per day

    Aspartame

    Brand names include Nutrasweet®, Equal®, and Sugar Twin®
    ~ 200x sweeter than table sugar
    Does contain calories but due to sweetness consumers are likely to use much less of it. It is the only approved nutritive sugar-substitute because it contains more than 2% of the calories in the equivalent amount of sugar.
    People who have a genetic disorder called Phenylketonuria (PKU) should avoid or restrict aspartame because they have problems metabolizing phenylalanine. Labels must include a statement to inform if a product contains phenylketonurics/phenylalanine.
    ADI: is 50 (mg/kg bw/d), or about 165 packets per day

    Neotame

    Brand name Newtame®
    ~ 7,000 to 13,000x sweeter than table sugar
    ADI: is .3 (mg/kg bw/d), or about 200 packets per day

    Saccharin

    Brand names include Sweet and Low®, Sweet Twin®, Sweet'N Low®, and Necta Sweet®
    ~200-700x sweeter than table sugar
    ADI: is 15 (mg/kg bw/d), or about 250 packets per day

    Sucralose

    Brand name Splenda®
    ~600x sweeter than table sugar
    ADI: is 5 (mg/kg bw/d), or about 165 packets per day


    Another popular high-intensity sweetener is made from the Stevia plant. The Steviol Glycosides obtained from the leaves of this plant are very sweet and have been submitted to the FDA to become a GRAS.

    Stevia/high purity steviol glycosides

    Brand names include Truvia®, PureVia®, Enliten®
    ~200-400x sweeter than table sugar
    Although not yet determined by the FDA, the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) ADI is 4(mg/kg bw/d), or about 29 packets

    @amusedmonkey

    Thank you.

    I drink diet 7up in 250 ml cans. I just looked at the can and it does list an upper limit for this specific drink. It lists two ingredients with an upper limit: Aspartame (81 mg per can and 40mg/kg/d limit) and Acesulfame K (21 mg per can and a 15mg/kg/day limit). Rounding down to 80 kg for ease I would need to drink 40 cans a day to reach the limit. That's 10 liters of liquid a day. Water toxicity is more of a concern at that point.

    It's interesting, though. Check your favorite drink and you may notice a similar recommended upper limit.

    Oh that's interesting! I'm drinking diet coke now and don't see the warning but you can scan to their website and it may mention it there. It does state "tastes great cold!". I'm not sure who they think wouldn't know that, or if maybe it's a subtle warning it doesn't taste so great warm?
  • mph323
    mph323 Posts: 3,566 Member
    Johnny Garlic's has cherry coke barbecued ribs - mmmmmm! Probably not diet though.
  • amusedmonkey
    amusedmonkey Posts: 10,331 Member
    mph323 wrote: »
    Sincere question here:

    How much diet soda is considered to be too much diet soda? Meaning how much at one time or how much per day is considered to be unhealthy?

    There is no "too much" established specifically for diet soda, but here is a rough list of what would be considered "too much" depending on the type and amount of sweetener used:
    Acesulfame potassium (Ace-K)

    Brand names Sunett® and Sweet One®
    ~200x sweeter than table sugar and is often combined with other sweeteners
    ADI: is 15 (mg/kg bw/d), or about 165 packets

    Advantame

    ~20,000x sweeter than table sugar (sucrose)
    ADI: is 32.8 (mg/kg bw/d), or about 4,000 packets per day

    Aspartame

    Brand names include Nutrasweet®, Equal®, and Sugar Twin®
    ~ 200x sweeter than table sugar
    Does contain calories but due to sweetness consumers are likely to use much less of it. It is the only approved nutritive sugar-substitute because it contains more than 2% of the calories in the equivalent amount of sugar.
    People who have a genetic disorder called Phenylketonuria (PKU) should avoid or restrict aspartame because they have problems metabolizing phenylalanine. Labels must include a statement to inform if a product contains phenylketonurics/phenylalanine.
    ADI: is 50 (mg/kg bw/d), or about 165 packets per day

    Neotame

    Brand name Newtame®
    ~ 7,000 to 13,000x sweeter than table sugar
    ADI: is .3 (mg/kg bw/d), or about 200 packets per day

    Saccharin

    Brand names include Sweet and Low®, Sweet Twin®, Sweet'N Low®, and Necta Sweet®
    ~200-700x sweeter than table sugar
    ADI: is 15 (mg/kg bw/d), or about 250 packets per day

    Sucralose

    Brand name Splenda®
    ~600x sweeter than table sugar
    ADI: is 5 (mg/kg bw/d), or about 165 packets per day


    Another popular high-intensity sweetener is made from the Stevia plant. The Steviol Glycosides obtained from the leaves of this plant are very sweet and have been submitted to the FDA to become a GRAS.

    Stevia/high purity steviol glycosides

    Brand names include Truvia®, PureVia®, Enliten®
    ~200-400x sweeter than table sugar
    Although not yet determined by the FDA, the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) ADI is 4(mg/kg bw/d), or about 29 packets

    @amusedmonkey

    Thank you.

    I drink diet 7up in 250 ml cans. I just looked at the can and it does list an upper limit for this specific drink. It lists two ingredients with an upper limit: Aspartame (81 mg per can and 40mg/kg/d limit) and Acesulfame K (21 mg per can and a 15mg/kg/day limit). Rounding down to 80 kg for ease I would need to drink 40 cans a day to reach the limit. That's 10 liters of liquid a day. Water toxicity is more of a concern at that point.

    It's interesting, though. Check your favorite drink and you may notice a similar recommended upper limit.

    Oh that's interesting! I'm drinking diet coke now and don't see the warning but you can scan to their website and it may mention it there. It does state "tastes great cold!". I'm not sure who they think wouldn't know that, or if maybe it's a subtle warning it doesn't taste so great warm?

    Look in the ingredients. My can lists that as a part of the ingredients not a separate warning.
  • janejellyroll
    janejellyroll Posts: 25,878 Member
    earlnabby wrote: »
    Andy10725 wrote: »
    Andy10725 wrote: »
    Andy10725 wrote: »
    Andy10725 wrote: »
    I don't believe in diet version of drinks. It's just as bad if not more harmful. Putting that on food diary to attempt to keep cal count low is just fooling yourself. Same goes for sugar substitutes. Just man up and consume the real thing, it's not the end of the world.

    How is it more harmful? Why can't I spend those calories on something else? Or do you not believe that they're actually 0 calorie and that the manufacturers are lying and getting away with it?
    Exactly the reason for my respond above. I believe the stuff you eat matters to the organ. Sure it's 0 cal, but if u have too much of it, what would happen to ur organs? We all enjoy a little junk here n there from time to time. But when u r consuming something bad and not being aware or alert of it, that'd be troublesome.

    You keep dancing around the question. WHAT is bad about it.
    Didn't dance around anything. My biggest concern with it is over-consuming it without knowing you are having too much of it compared with how you would react to regular counterpart.
    But to name other, diabetes, heart disease.

    There is no sugar in, wait for it, sugar free drinks so how on earth can it impact/cause/exacerbate or whatever, diabetes?

    Same goes for heart disease, where on earth have you seen a study that shows this link?

    There is no evidence (not fear mongering blogs or websites) to indicate there is anything wrong with the consumption of diet drinks and any potential issues (so far only observed in mice as far as I'm aware) would call for drinking amounts that would cause far worse problems long before the side effects of the diet drink kicked in.

    Oy vey.
    Here: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11606-011-1968-2

    When I was a server I noticed a common phenomenon. People who are really overweight often order diet soft drinks. I don't know if it is a misplaced attempt at doing the right thing or if it is some kind of cognitive dissonance, because they would then go on to order potato skins with cheese/bacon/sour cream, ribs and fries and to top it off a mudslide sundae. With a refill of diet soda.

    Vascular events would definitely be part of their diet program - if I were to guess.

    "It’s because people make false correlations. People who drink calorie-free drinks tend to fall for the Health Halo of Food effect: they assume because they’re drinking zero-calorie drinks they can eat more food. This leads them to consume a greater number of calories and gaining more weight (and fat). People then make a faulty correlation between the two: “Diet drinks cause weight gain”, instead of, “People end up eating more calories leading them to gain more weight”." (Quoted from this article: http://physiqonomics.com/aspartame/ )

    That is sometimes true I'm sure, but I think just as often they simply know they are fat and are cutting calories where they can. They know they aren't going to give up the burger or fries so they cut a couple hundred calories from the meal via their drink.

    Yeah, when I was overweight I was never "falling" for anything when I ordered a diet drink with a high calorie meal. It was just that I knew I wouldn't miss the calories in the soda and even thought I knew I was still eating more than I needed, I figured I might as well cut calories where I could. Better to go 500 calories over what I needed than 1,000 over, that was my logic.
  • mph323
    mph323 Posts: 3,566 Member
    mph323 wrote: »
    Sincere question here:

    How much diet soda is considered to be too much diet soda? Meaning how much at one time or how much per day is considered to be unhealthy?

    There is no "too much" established specifically for diet soda, but here is a rough list of what would be considered "too much" depending on the type and amount of sweetener used:
    Acesulfame potassium (Ace-K)

    Brand names Sunett® and Sweet One®
    ~200x sweeter than table sugar and is often combined with other sweeteners
    ADI: is 15 (mg/kg bw/d), or about 165 packets

    Advantame

    ~20,000x sweeter than table sugar (sucrose)
    ADI: is 32.8 (mg/kg bw/d), or about 4,000 packets per day

    Aspartame

    Brand names include Nutrasweet®, Equal®, and Sugar Twin®
    ~ 200x sweeter than table sugar
    Does contain calories but due to sweetness consumers are likely to use much less of it. It is the only approved nutritive sugar-substitute because it contains more than 2% of the calories in the equivalent amount of sugar.
    People who have a genetic disorder called Phenylketonuria (PKU) should avoid or restrict aspartame because they have problems metabolizing phenylalanine. Labels must include a statement to inform if a product contains phenylketonurics/phenylalanine.
    ADI: is 50 (mg/kg bw/d), or about 165 packets per day

    Neotame

    Brand name Newtame®
    ~ 7,000 to 13,000x sweeter than table sugar
    ADI: is .3 (mg/kg bw/d), or about 200 packets per day

    Saccharin

    Brand names include Sweet and Low®, Sweet Twin®, Sweet'N Low®, and Necta Sweet®
    ~200-700x sweeter than table sugar
    ADI: is 15 (mg/kg bw/d), or about 250 packets per day

    Sucralose

    Brand name Splenda®
    ~600x sweeter than table sugar
    ADI: is 5 (mg/kg bw/d), or about 165 packets per day


    Another popular high-intensity sweetener is made from the Stevia plant. The Steviol Glycosides obtained from the leaves of this plant are very sweet and have been submitted to the FDA to become a GRAS.

    Stevia/high purity steviol glycosides

    Brand names include Truvia®, PureVia®, Enliten®
    ~200-400x sweeter than table sugar
    Although not yet determined by the FDA, the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) ADI is 4(mg/kg bw/d), or about 29 packets

    @amusedmonkey

    Thank you.

    I drink diet 7up in 250 ml cans. I just looked at the can and it does list an upper limit for this specific drink. It lists two ingredients with an upper limit: Aspartame (81 mg per can and 40mg/kg/d limit) and Acesulfame K (21 mg per can and a 15mg/kg/day limit). Rounding down to 80 kg for ease I would need to drink 40 cans a day to reach the limit. That's 10 liters of liquid a day. Water toxicity is more of a concern at that point.

    It's interesting, though. Check your favorite drink and you may notice a similar recommended upper limit.

    Oh that's interesting! I'm drinking diet coke now and don't see the warning but you can scan to their website and it may mention it there. It does state "tastes great cold!". I'm not sure who they think wouldn't know that, or if maybe it's a subtle warning it doesn't taste so great warm?

    Look in the ingredients. My can lists that as a part of the ingredients not a separate warning.

    Hmmm, no. I went to the website and looked at the nutrition and ingredient info and don't see it there either. Very strange. Must not be a labeling requirement, but it would make sense to include it for legal purposes.
  • Speziface
    Speziface Posts: 1,687 Member
    earlnabby wrote: »
    mph323 wrote: »
    Johnny Garlic's has cherry coke barbecued ribs - mmmmmm! Probably not diet though.

    I make boneless, skinless chicken breasts in barbecue sauce using diet cola and ketchup. Brown the chicken in a frying pan, add 1 can of cola and 1 cup ketchup. Turn down the heat and simmer until the sauce thickens and chicken is done.

    I'd stir in a tablespoon or so of mustard just for the background notes.
  • earlnabby
    earlnabby Posts: 8,177 Member
    Speziface wrote: »
    earlnabby wrote: »
    mph323 wrote: »
    Johnny Garlic's has cherry coke barbecued ribs - mmmmmm! Probably not diet though.

    I make boneless, skinless chicken breasts in barbecue sauce using diet cola and ketchup. Brown the chicken in a frying pan, add 1 can of cola and 1 cup ketchup. Turn down the heat and simmer until the sauce thickens and chicken is done.

    I'd stir in a tablespoon or so of mustard just for the background notes.

    Good idea. I often dump in a splash of cider vinegar to cut the sweetness of the ketchup.
  • Speziface
    Speziface Posts: 1,687 Member
    earlnabby wrote: »
    Speziface wrote: »
    earlnabby wrote: »
    mph323 wrote: »
    Johnny Garlic's has cherry coke barbecued ribs - mmmmmm! Probably not diet though.

    I make boneless, skinless chicken breasts in barbecue sauce using diet cola and ketchup. Brown the chicken in a frying pan, add 1 can of cola and 1 cup ketchup. Turn down the heat and simmer until the sauce thickens and chicken is done.

    I'd stir in a tablespoon or so of mustard just for the background notes.

    Good idea. I often dump in a splash of cider vinegar to cut the sweetness of the ketchup.

    You could always skip the ketchup and just go with canned tomatoes; preferably the kind with some sort of seasoning already added. That would really cut back the sweetness, although if you needed more a little molasses or honey could be added.
  • earlnabby
    earlnabby Posts: 8,177 Member
    Speziface wrote: »
    earlnabby wrote: »
    Speziface wrote: »
    earlnabby wrote: »
    mph323 wrote: »
    Johnny Garlic's has cherry coke barbecued ribs - mmmmmm! Probably not diet though.

    I make boneless, skinless chicken breasts in barbecue sauce using diet cola and ketchup. Brown the chicken in a frying pan, add 1 can of cola and 1 cup ketchup. Turn down the heat and simmer until the sauce thickens and chicken is done.

    I'd stir in a tablespoon or so of mustard just for the background notes.

    Good idea. I often dump in a splash of cider vinegar to cut the sweetness of the ketchup.

    You could always skip the ketchup and just go with canned tomatoes; preferably the kind with some sort of seasoning already added. That would really cut back the sweetness, although if you needed more a little molasses or honey could be added.

    Tried it. Doesn't work nearly as well. You need some sweetness to caramelize. It might work if using regular cola instead of diet.
This discussion has been closed.