Calorie Counter

You are currently viewing the message boards in:

Keto diet = good or bad

1101113151644

Replies

  • alc649alc649 Posts: 457Member Member Posts: 457Member Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    alc649 wrote: »
    psuLemon wrote: »
    It's good if it helps you stay compliant, eliminate trigger foods, helps you form better relationships with foods and helps you long term to meeting a good weight.

    It sucks if you struggle with diets that are super restrictive, and enjoy and are satiated by healthy carb sources likes fruits/veggies/starches.

    This! I've only been doing keto for the past 2 weeks, but it helps me with my food addiction, keeps me away from my trigger foods, and allows me to truly listen to my body and tell when i'm actually hungry or just wanting to eat to eat. It's great to be able to stop eating when i'm full and actually leave food on the plate! With my trigger foods: fried foods mostly, french fries, things like that- i always felt "compelled" to eat the rest, even if it made me so stuffed i felt sick!

    It's interesting how often (as here) trigger foods are perceived as "carbs" but really are carbs + fat, often about half and half. Fried foods are inherently high fat, not inherently "carbs" although they can be also high in carbs if they are potatoes (fries are about half and half fat and carbs) or you add breading.

    Anyway, that aside, I agree keto can be a satiating way to eat (as can just plain low carb or for some ignoring macros and focusing on what they feel satisfies them). Low fat also can (lots of people who can't stop eating fries or burgers have no issue with vegetables, plain potatoes, fish or leaner cuts of protein), but low carb is more likely to feel like you can still eat lots of indulgent foods on it, so it's not hard, for lots of people who do really like fat or meat.

    Interestingly, plain potatoes typically score as about the highest satiety per calorie score, where's fried potatoes (particularly fries) or other combinations of potatoes plus fat (mashed potatoes with cream and butter) score much lower.

    Anyway, others may feel much more indulgent on a lower fat, higher fat, but nutrient dense diet, and so find that more enjoyable and easier to stick to.

    I think everyone's trigger foods can be different :)
  • SparkyJess3SparkyJess3 Posts: 618Member Member Posts: 618Member Member
    Keto is the only way of eating that has worked for me. I feel so much better when I am on it. More energy, not sluggish, no bloat or inflammation, no brain fog! So many people state that you will instantly gain weight back when cycling off, but I maintained over a 20 pound loss for over a year. I'm cycling back on now to lose my last 20 pounds.

    I stay under 20g net carbs a day, but I still eat fruits and veggies. I just fit them into my macros. I stick to the berry family as they are lower in fructose and I eat mostly green leafy veggies. So many people jump to the conclusion that keto is unhealthy because they see people eating bacon constantly. I do eat bacon, but it is not daily! Try sticking to healthier fats like avocado, nuts and coconut oil.
  • GottaBurnEmAllGottaBurnEmAll Posts: 7,724Member Member Posts: 7,724Member Member
    alc649 wrote: »
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    alc649 wrote: »
    psuLemon wrote: »
    It's good if it helps you stay compliant, eliminate trigger foods, helps you form better relationships with foods and helps you long term to meeting a good weight.

    It sucks if you struggle with diets that are super restrictive, and enjoy and are satiated by healthy carb sources likes fruits/veggies/starches.

    This! I've only been doing keto for the past 2 weeks, but it helps me with my food addiction, keeps me away from my trigger foods, and allows me to truly listen to my body and tell when i'm actually hungry or just wanting to eat to eat. It's great to be able to stop eating when i'm full and actually leave food on the plate! With my trigger foods: fried foods mostly, french fries, things like that- i always felt "compelled" to eat the rest, even if it made me so stuffed i felt sick!

    It's interesting how often (as here) trigger foods are perceived as "carbs" but really are carbs + fat, often about half and half. Fried foods are inherently high fat, not inherently "carbs" although they can be also high in carbs if they are potatoes (fries are about half and half fat and carbs) or you add breading.

    Anyway, that aside, I agree keto can be a satiating way to eat (as can just plain low carb or for some ignoring macros and focusing on what they feel satisfies them). Low fat also can (lots of people who can't stop eating fries or burgers have no issue with vegetables, plain potatoes, fish or leaner cuts of protein), but low carb is more likely to feel like you can still eat lots of indulgent foods on it, so it's not hard, for lots of people who do really like fat or meat.

    Interestingly, plain potatoes typically score as about the highest satiety per calorie score, where's fried potatoes (particularly fries) or other combinations of potatoes plus fat (mashed potatoes with cream and butter) score much lower.

    Anyway, others may feel much more indulgent on a lower fat, higher fat, but nutrient dense diet, and so find that more enjoyable and easier to stick to.

    I think everyone's trigger foods can be different :)

    This is true, but I think we can eliminate broccoli, carrots, califlower, beans, apples, pears, oranges, zucchini,....... Most "trigger" foods do fall into categories. After years on the boards you see people always posting about the same handful of things that they can't control eating...and strangely, it's not bags of sugar either.

    I do have a trigger food that's in the category you list: roasted chickpeas. I completely lack self control with them. They don't have to have lots of fat with them, so it wasn't about that either. In fact, my favorite brand was very low fat. It's the salt and crunch factor.

    I have to be careful when I have chickpeas in the house not to give in to the temptation to roast up some for myself outside of using them for meals. It's that bad. I went through a long stretch of not eating them at all.

    Saying all this, I'm making a Moroccon butternut and chickpea stew for dinner tonight, and can hardly wait for it!
  • GottaBurnEmAllGottaBurnEmAll Posts: 7,724Member Member Posts: 7,724Member Member
    alc649 wrote: »
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    alc649 wrote: »
    psuLemon wrote: »
    It's good if it helps you stay compliant, eliminate trigger foods, helps you form better relationships with foods and helps you long term to meeting a good weight.

    It sucks if you struggle with diets that are super restrictive, and enjoy and are satiated by healthy carb sources likes fruits/veggies/starches.

    This! I've only been doing keto for the past 2 weeks, but it helps me with my food addiction, keeps me away from my trigger foods, and allows me to truly listen to my body and tell when i'm actually hungry or just wanting to eat to eat. It's great to be able to stop eating when i'm full and actually leave food on the plate! With my trigger foods: fried foods mostly, french fries, things like that- i always felt "compelled" to eat the rest, even if it made me so stuffed i felt sick!

    It's interesting how often (as here) trigger foods are perceived as "carbs" but really are carbs + fat, often about half and half. Fried foods are inherently high fat, not inherently "carbs" although they can be also high in carbs if they are potatoes (fries are about half and half fat and carbs) or you add breading.

    Anyway, that aside, I agree keto can be a satiating way to eat (as can just plain low carb or for some ignoring macros and focusing on what they feel satisfies them). Low fat also can (lots of people who can't stop eating fries or burgers have no issue with vegetables, plain potatoes, fish or leaner cuts of protein), but low carb is more likely to feel like you can still eat lots of indulgent foods on it, so it's not hard, for lots of people who do really like fat or meat.

    Interestingly, plain potatoes typically score as about the highest satiety per calorie score, where's fried potatoes (particularly fries) or other combinations of potatoes plus fat (mashed potatoes with cream and butter) score much lower.

    Anyway, others may feel much more indulgent on a lower fat, higher fat, but nutrient dense diet, and so find that more enjoyable and easier to stick to.

    I think everyone's trigger foods can be different :)

    This is true, but I think we can eliminate broccoli, carrots, califlower, beans, apples, pears, oranges, zucchini,....... Most "trigger" foods do fall into categories. After years on the boards you see people always posting about the same handful of things that they can't control eating...and strangely, it's not bags of sugar either.

    I do have a trigger food that's in the category you list: roasted chickpeas. I completely lack self control with them. They don't have to have lots of fat with them, so it wasn't about that either. In fact, my favorite brand was very low fat. It's the salt and crunch factor.

    I have to be careful when I have chickpeas in the house not to give in to the temptation to roast up some for myself outside of using them for meals. It's that bad. I went through a long stretch of not eating them at all.

    Saying all this, I'm making a Moroccon butternut and chickpea stew for dinner tonight, and can hardly wait for it!

    I could easily eat several hundred calories of low-fat refried beans, straight from the can. Most of my trigger foods are higher in fat, but for some reason it's just hard for me to stop eating refried beans.

    Oh, those too. They're EBIL! It's that creamy texture.
  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Posts: 20,811Member Member Posts: 20,811Member Member
    alc649 wrote: »
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    alc649 wrote: »
    psuLemon wrote: »
    It's good if it helps you stay compliant, eliminate trigger foods, helps you form better relationships with foods and helps you long term to meeting a good weight.

    It sucks if you struggle with diets that are super restrictive, and enjoy and are satiated by healthy carb sources likes fruits/veggies/starches.

    This! I've only been doing keto for the past 2 weeks, but it helps me with my food addiction, keeps me away from my trigger foods, and allows me to truly listen to my body and tell when i'm actually hungry or just wanting to eat to eat. It's great to be able to stop eating when i'm full and actually leave food on the plate! With my trigger foods: fried foods mostly, french fries, things like that- i always felt "compelled" to eat the rest, even if it made me so stuffed i felt sick!

    It's interesting how often (as here) trigger foods are perceived as "carbs" but really are carbs + fat, often about half and half. Fried foods are inherently high fat, not inherently "carbs" although they can be also high in carbs if they are potatoes (fries are about half and half fat and carbs) or you add breading.

    Anyway, that aside, I agree keto can be a satiating way to eat (as can just plain low carb or for some ignoring macros and focusing on what they feel satisfies them). Low fat also can (lots of people who can't stop eating fries or burgers have no issue with vegetables, plain potatoes, fish or leaner cuts of protein), but low carb is more likely to feel like you can still eat lots of indulgent foods on it, so it's not hard, for lots of people who do really like fat or meat.

    Interestingly, plain potatoes typically score as about the highest satiety per calorie score, where's fried potatoes (particularly fries) or other combinations of potatoes plus fat (mashed potatoes with cream and butter) score much lower.

    Anyway, others may feel much more indulgent on a lower fat, higher fat, but nutrient dense diet, and so find that more enjoyable and easier to stick to.

    I think everyone's trigger foods can be different :)

    This is true, but I think we can eliminate broccoli, carrots, califlower, beans, apples, pears, oranges, zucchini,....... Most "trigger" foods do fall into categories. After years on the boards you see people always posting about the same handful of things that they can't control eating...and strangely, it's not bags of sugar either.

    I do have a trigger food that's in the category you list: roasted chickpeas. I completely lack self control with them. They don't have to have lots of fat with them, so it wasn't about that either. In fact, my favorite brand was very low fat. It's the salt and crunch factor.

    I have to be careful when I have chickpeas in the house not to give in to the temptation to roast up some for myself outside of using them for meals. It's that bad. I went through a long stretch of not eating them at all.

    Saying all this, I'm making a Moroccon butternut and chickpea stew for dinner tonight, and can hardly wait for it!

    I could easily eat several hundred calories of low-fat refried beans, straight from the can. Most of my trigger foods are higher in fat, but for some reason it's just hard for me to stop eating refried beans.

    Oh, those too. They're EBIL! It's that creamy texture.

    Yeah, I don't have the same problem with my homemade ones. I really enjoy them, but they don't prompt that "MUST KEEP EATING" urge.
This discussion has been closed.