For the love of Produce...

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  • BattyKnitter
    BattyKnitter Posts: 503 Member
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    This thread is making me impatient for all the snow to melt so I can plant my veggie garden! We are expanding it this year and I can't wait to plant MORE! I've learned that I need to plant WAY more carrots and sugar snap peas as I go through those faster than they can grow! :lol:
  • lbgardener
    lbgardener Posts: 13 Member
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    Here's a theory on whether your genes play a role in what you like - I think it's your gut microbiome. Your gut microbiome is somewhat inherited and influences your genes but it's also influenced by what you eat now and in the past. Why is it, otherwise, that children raised in a family that uses hot peppers a lot can handle heat a lot quicker than someone of my anglo-saxon heritage? Maybe even as adults, we need to challenge our tastebuds now & then. Of course, mental attitude towards food can make you like or dislike something too. It's funny how my sister will eat liver & onions because of it's sentimental value growing up with it and I refuse to eat it again because I remember throwing up it as a kid and the horrible stench in my memories.
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 33,085 Member
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    crazyravr wrote: »
    Last night in my kitchen prepping for simple at home evening snacking :)

    Head of cauliflower cut up and roasted (two trays)
    Broccoli crowns cut up and roasted (two trays)
    Okra 2lbs whole roasted (two trays)
    3 zucchini, 3 carrots, 3 beets, fennel bulb, jicama sprialized left raw.
    Batch of tahini dressing done.

    Mixed all the roasted veggies in a large rub, added couple spoons of tahini (not the dressing) and stirred. Into the fridge.
    All spiralized vegg into separate containers and into the fridge.
    Evening snacking as I catch up on tv shows, done :)

    Why have I never roasted okra? It seems so obvious, now you say it.

    Must try. (Thanks!)
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 33,085 Member
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    crazyravr wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    crazyravr wrote: »
    Last night in my kitchen prepping for simple at home evening snacking :)

    Head of cauliflower cut up and roasted (two trays)
    Broccoli crowns cut up and roasted (two trays)
    Okra 2lbs whole roasted (two trays)
    3 zucchini, 3 carrots, 3 beets, fennel bulb, jicama sprialized left raw.
    Batch of tahini dressing done.

    Mixed all the roasted veggies in a large rub, added couple spoons of tahini (not the dressing) and stirred. Into the fridge.
    All spiralized vegg into separate containers and into the fridge.
    Evening snacking as I catch up on tv shows, done :)

    Why have I never roasted okra? It seems so obvious, now you say it.

    Must try. (Thanks!)

    What I really like about roasting Okra is that:
    a) there is no sliminess
    b) crisps up amazingly from frozen which is cheap and easy to get

    Whoah: Thanks for adding that! I was thinking I'd have to wait for okra season (trucked-in sometimes available in Winter, but often sad). Can you describe your roasting process for the frozen: Thaw first or no, temp, typical time? Thanks!

    (Drooling already: OhYum!).
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 33,085 Member
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    crazyravr wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    crazyravr wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    crazyravr wrote: »
    Last night in my kitchen prepping for simple at home evening snacking :)

    Head of cauliflower cut up and roasted (two trays)
    Broccoli crowns cut up and roasted (two trays)
    Okra 2lbs whole roasted (two trays)
    3 zucchini, 3 carrots, 3 beets, fennel bulb, jicama sprialized left raw.
    Batch of tahini dressing done.

    Mixed all the roasted veggies in a large rub, added couple spoons of tahini (not the dressing) and stirred. Into the fridge.
    All spiralized vegg into separate containers and into the fridge.
    Evening snacking as I catch up on tv shows, done :)

    Why have I never roasted okra? It seems so obvious, now you say it.

    Must try. (Thanks!)

    What I really like about roasting Okra is that:
    a) there is no sliminess
    b) crisps up amazingly from frozen which is cheap and easy to get

    Whoah: Thanks for adding that! I was thinking I'd have to wait for okra season (trucked-in sometimes available in Winter, but often sad). Can you describe your roasting process for the frozen: Thaw first or no, temp, typical time? Thanks!

    (Drooling already: OhYum!).

    Preheat to 425F.
    Line a tray with parchment paper.
    Dump the okra frozen from the bag onto the tray and break it up so that its in a single layer (more or less).
    Place into the oven and roast for 20 minutes. At this point, take out the pan, shake it up and ensure its all in single layer, spray with olive oil and season S+P and place back in for another 20 minutes or to your preferred done level. I like mine charred so I leave it for longer and shake it once more.

    Thanks: "Frozen Okra" is now on my shopping list. Can't wait to try it!
  • zeejane03
    zeejane03 Posts: 993 Member
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    Dumb question-what does okra taste like?

    This thread is making me realize that I'm really produce challenged lol.
  • lemurcat2
    lemurcat2 Posts: 7,885 Member
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    I've only had okra in gumbo (where it's good) and fixed in a way that's slimy, so this roasted from frozen idea is something I will try.
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 33,085 Member
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    crazyravr wrote: »
    zeejane03 wrote: »
    Dumb question-what does okra taste like?

    This thread is making me realize that I'm really produce challenged lol.

    Okra tastes like well........... Okra :)

    LOL! I was wondering whether someone would try to answer that unanswerable question.
    zeejane03 wrote: »
    Dumb question-what does okra taste like?

    This thread is making me realize that I'm really produce challenged lol.

    It's been a while since I ate some (late summer when I could get it local/fresh), but I'll give it a shot. It's not strongly flavored. It has a non-startling basic mild, pleasant green-vegetable flavor, but I say that as someone who's not at all bitter-sensitive (I didn't find it at all bitter, I'm just admitting my biases/limitations). There might be just a small hint of umami richness.

    Many people dislike it because it gets truly slimy or mucilaginous when quite-cooked, so one culinary use is as thickener in things like gumbo. There are cooking methods that minimize the mucilaginous quality. I've ususally sliced and quick stir-fried (or stir-steamed) until just nicely hot (but I'm gonna try that roasting thing). Cross-sliced and not cooked to mush, the shape looks nice in food - like a little flower or star.

    If you grow them, they have lovely flowers, often yellow - a bit hibiscus-looking. Flowers are also edible, though I haven't tried them. It's a heat-loving plant, so Northern gardeners would be well-served by getting an adapted variety. Johnny's Selected Seeds (which every Northern gardener ought to know about ;) ) usually has a couple of suitable early varieties.
  • purplefizzy
    purplefizzy Posts: 594 Member
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    crazyravr wrote: »
    Last night in my kitchen prepping for simple at home evening snacking :)

    Head of cauliflower cut up and roasted (two trays)
    Broccoli crowns cut up and roasted (two trays)
    Okra 2lbs whole roasted (two trays)
    3 zucchini, 3 carrots, 3 beets, fennel bulb, jicama sprialized left raw.
    Batch of tahini dressing done.

    Mixed all the roasted veggies in a large rub, added couple spoons of tahini (not the dressing) and stirred. Into the fridge.
    All spiralized vegg into separate containers and into the fridge.
    Evening snacking as I catch up on tv shows, done :)

    I’m coming over.
    This is my sorta snacking.

    Guys, can we please start a campaign to teach people how to properly prepare vegetables?
    Doritos have NOTHING on roasted cauli. That stuff is downright SEXY. Dry heat. YES.
  • purplefizzy
    purplefizzy Posts: 594 Member
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    Salted crispy orange slices. ukz9w02rwqkr.jpeg

    (Yes, Inspired by the cover of Martha Stewart. I added pink salt, they are best IMO with Cara Cara oranges.)
  • Tankiscool
    Tankiscool Posts: 11,105 Member
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    Salted crispy orange slices. ukz9w02rwqkr.jpeg

    (Yes, Inspired by the cover of Martha Stewart. I added pink salt, they are best IMO with Cara Cara oranges.)

    What do you do? Cover them in salt and then dehydrate them?
  • Susieq_1994
    Susieq_1994 Posts: 5,361 Member
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    Maybe we need to start a cilantro poll or thread and gather evidence.

    Personally hated it as a little kid. Soapy.
    Lived in rural Mexico as a teenager- soapy and unavoidable because my Spanglish was non-stellar and the type of places we ate (often a local woman’s kitchen) were not places where you made requests. I ate what I was served. The food still brings fond memories.

    Today, cilantro (the smell especially) is really soapy. In a way that I LOVE.

    Same story around red beets.
    They still taste earthy, but like the most cravable earth ever.
    Golden and Chiogga beets are what I reach for first for raw, but red I will roast.

    Beets, especially red ones, sorta make my throat weird, so I have to shave them really thin and eat them sparingly.

    (It’s not as bad as pineapple. God I love that stuff, and it does NOT love me. Tongue swells, mouth itches. I used to cater, and my boss would ALWAYS know if I was eating pineapple. It was a team joke, they would tease me in my ‘pineapple voice.’)

    Cilantro smells and tastes fresh and lemony to me. No soapiness at all!
  • lemurcat2
    lemurcat2 Posts: 7,885 Member
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    Maybe we need to start a cilantro poll or thread and gather evidence.

    Personally hated it as a little kid. Soapy.
    Lived in rural Mexico as a teenager- soapy and unavoidable because my Spanglish was non-stellar and the type of places we ate (often a local woman’s kitchen) were not places where you made requests. I ate what I was served. The food still brings fond memories.

    Today, cilantro (the smell especially) is really soapy. In a way that I LOVE.

    Same story around red beets.
    They still taste earthy, but like the most cravable earth ever.
    Golden and Chiogga beets are what I reach for first for raw, but red I will roast.

    Beets, especially red ones, sorta make my throat weird, so I have to shave them really thin and eat them sparingly.

    (It’s not as bad as pineapple. God I love that stuff, and it does NOT love me. Tongue swells, mouth itches. I used to cater, and my boss would ALWAYS know if I was eating pineapple. It was a team joke, they would tease me in my ‘pineapple voice.’)

    Cilantro smells and tastes fresh and lemony to me. No soapiness at all!

    Same here. I think it's some genetic thing that affects how you taste it.

    I think beets are different, they do taste earthy, but some (like me) like the flavor, and some don't. I can recognize what people who say "ick, they taste like dirt" are talking about while still liking them. I don't understand associating cilantro with soap, it just doesn't taste like that to me (although I believe it does to some).
  • GottaBurnEmAll
    GottaBurnEmAll Posts: 7,722 Member
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    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    Maybe we need to start a cilantro poll or thread and gather evidence.

    Personally hated it as a little kid. Soapy.
    Lived in rural Mexico as a teenager- soapy and unavoidable because my Spanglish was non-stellar and the type of places we ate (often a local woman’s kitchen) were not places where you made requests. I ate what I was served. The food still brings fond memories.

    Today, cilantro (the smell especially) is really soapy. In a way that I LOVE.

    Same story around red beets.
    They still taste earthy, but like the most cravable earth ever.
    Golden and Chiogga beets are what I reach for first for raw, but red I will roast.

    Beets, especially red ones, sorta make my throat weird, so I have to shave them really thin and eat them sparingly.

    (It’s not as bad as pineapple. God I love that stuff, and it does NOT love me. Tongue swells, mouth itches. I used to cater, and my boss would ALWAYS know if I was eating pineapple. It was a team joke, they would tease me in my ‘pineapple voice.’)

    Cilantro smells and tastes fresh and lemony to me. No soapiness at all!

    Same here. I think it's some genetic thing that affects how you taste it.

    I think beets are different, they do taste earthy, but some (like me) like the flavor, and some don't. I can recognize what people who say "ick, they taste like dirt" are talking about while still liking them. I don't understand associating cilantro with soap, it just doesn't taste like that to me (although I believe it does to some).

    I'm one who just doesn't like that earthy taste at all. I don't even like Swiss chard because it tastes like beets. Pity, because it's so pretty.

    I do love cilantro, though.
  • zeejane03
    zeejane03 Posts: 993 Member
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    Salted crispy orange slices. ukz9w02rwqkr.jpeg

    (Yes, Inspired by the cover of Martha Stewart. I added pink salt, they are best IMO with Cara Cara oranges.)

    Did you use a dehydrator? I have one but have only used it for apples so far.
  • purplefizzy
    purplefizzy Posts: 594 Member
    edited March 2019
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    zeejane03 wrote: »
    Salted crispy orange slices. ukz9w02rwqkr.jpeg

    (Yes, Inspired by the cover of Martha Stewart. I added pink salt, they are best IMO with Cara Cara oranges.)

    Did you use a dehydrator? I have one but have only used it for apples so far.

    Nope. I avoid extra gadgets whenever possible.
    I was SO late to the IP craze. Fought it and fought it.
    The method I’ve settled on:

    Oven to as low as possible (170 is what mine goes to.)
    Take oven racks out (mine has 2.)
    Lay parchment directly on racks.
    Slice citrus with mandolin, about 1/8 inch. Fresh slices best- when they age they get less firm and are harder to safely mandolin.
    Cram the parchment covered racks with slices. They will shrink. Get cozy.
    Sprinkle with sea salt. Fresh nutmeg is also weirdly nice.
    Put in oven, top and bottom 1/3 heights.
    Rotate racks after an hour.
    Sometimes I flip the slices to expedite drying.
    They should be pretty much crisp when you remove them- final crisping happens as the cool.

    Store airtight (I add one of those little packs of desiccant from an empty vitamin bottle. I learned to hoard those because they also help keep butter-fried sage and fried shallots crispy for a day or so. Those things both usually need to be done same-day but when I cater I do as little as possible same-day.)

    I’ve done Meyer lemon (salt and dill, good), Eureka lemon (don’t bother), ruby star grapefruit (salt and a sprinkle of monk fruit- good if you like bitter and I do) and Cara Cara oranges (just salt. Clear winner, everyone loves these.)

    Dried citrus is starting to trend in retail, but they use sugar and I don’t think this is a good application. Not necessary.

    •Question: anyone have good home method for dried ginger?
    I’m looking for low/minimal added sugar, and more crispy than chewy. The Australians have already perfected chewy sugared cubes- I can buy those when I need them.

    I’m looking to replicate these incredibly thin non-sweet dried ginger ‘shards’ that I bought in Brooklyn once. Can’t find them in the local Asian market circuit.
    My attempts have been tough and ‘interesting’ at best.
  • MichelleMcKeeRN
    MichelleMcKeeRN Posts: 450 Member
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    Oh my! Your food is beautiful!
  • nooshi713
    nooshi713 Posts: 4,877 Member
    edited March 2019
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    My main veggies are mixed baby greens. I eat a salad of them every day. I also love arugula and sometimes spinach, chard, or kale. In summer I am a big tomato and zucchini eater (fruits, technically). I love baby bell peppers and mushrooms. I want to start trying new veggies.

    Fruits, I eat them all. Golden kiwi, pomegranate, berries of all kinds, honeycrisp apples, pineapples, passion fruit, guava, nectarines, blood oranges, cuties.

    <3
  • purplefizzy
    purplefizzy Posts: 594 Member
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    Citrus edit:

    Actually more like 1/4 inch thick slices.
    (Need to change mandolin blade.)

    xzndprk62rbn.jpeg

    Then use the ‘orange butts’ to make tea!
    ihf43dtisk18.jpg

    If I’m home and it’s cold, always something in the oven.
    I’ve never gotten used to suburban forced heat (hate the hot blast at my face) and I cannot afford radiant flooring.
    So oven it is :)
  • Noreenmarie1234
    Noreenmarie1234 Posts: 7,492 Member
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    Citrus edit:

    Actually more like 1/4 inch thick slices.
    (Need to change mandolin blade.)

    xzndprk62rbn.jpeg

    Then use the ‘orange butts’ to make tea!
    ihf43dtisk18.jpg

    If I’m home and it’s cold, always something in the oven.
    I’ve never gotten used to suburban forced heat (hate the hot blast at my face) and I cannot afford radiant flooring.
    So oven it is :)

    Omg I need to try this! I've never thought crispy oranges with salt would be good, but they look fantastic. I bet this would be great with other fruits as well like lemons (I'd add salt, cinnamon and truvia for a sweet variety).