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Coronavirus prep

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  • Duck_PuddleDuck_Puddle Member, Premium Posts: 3,117 Member Member, Premium Posts: 3,117 Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    I would think the concern and urge to accumulate supplies is (possibly) less about the pending apocalypse or a global pandemic wiping out massive portions of the population, and more that even now there are supply chain issues (In some sectors) due to the number of ill and quarantined workers overseas (particularly, but not exclusively in China).

    Even aspirin becomes a commodity when the factories that make it are closed and local supplies dwindle and can’t be replenished.

    I live in a state that is still shell shocked from multiple periods where grocery stores & gas stations were inaccessible for weeks after storms (no power) and nobody here is making a run for those kinds of supplies (yet).

    Ya, a few days ago I was looking for an item to get my walmart.com order up to the free shipping minimum of $35, thought of the ibuprofen I get from Walmart, and that was OOS. Might be a coincidence, might not.

    No idea if it’s a coincidence or not, but the current lull in manufacturing of many medications (as they are made in regions of China where workers are either ill or quarantined do production happening) was raised as an example of possible impact even if we never see any real outbreak in the US. My Walmart was looking stark in the medication section as well-but there are at least 10000 possible reasons for that other than a supply shortage. I did not notice a shortage of toilet paper. Yet.

    I am not panicking about anything, nor am I really concerned about developing the virus (not more than a multitude of other illnesses anyway). But I do think there are possible practical concerns due to multiple supply chain disruptions. Or rather-disruptions in multiple supply chains.
  • kshama2001kshama2001 Member Posts: 22,474 Member Member Posts: 22,474 Member
    WinoGelato wrote: »
    If anyone is interesting in a fascinating dystopian fiction book that seems eerily relevant right now, Station Eleven, about a global pandemic that wipes out >99% of society is really good, it's about what happens 5 years later with the survivors and all the ways you would have to rebuild technology, culture, etc.

    I read it a few years ago and it haunted me then, now with this COVID19 situation I am reminded more and more of that book.

    Thanks! My library had it and it is now on my Kindle. Will start it after I get back from Walmart tonight, at which point I will ask myself why I didn't buy more toilet paper :lol:
  • leggupleggup Member Posts: 2,993 Member Member Posts: 2,993 Member
    I currently have 4 children knocked out with flu like symptoms... it’s been days of high fevers, crazy coughing, etc. I “joke” that it could be coronavirus, but we’ll never know since they can’t test for it yet! (Although I am seeing headlines that tests are making their way around). We are on the outskirts of DC, a “bedroom community” for people that work in the city, so lots of potential to bring it in. Haven’t been to the doctor, we homeschool so no need to expose them to anything else if the symptoms are treatable at home (we have been often enough to have the needed meds for her croup) so not 100% sure what it is.

    Wednesday is when it started, I thought my daughter was reacting to some bags of soil I bought - her cough started within minutes of being in the car with them. Super sensitive lungs, at age 8 she gets croup that shuts down her airways with any airborne irritant (no longer able to even swim in indoor chlorine pools). I went to buy a mask for her since we still had 45 minutes in the car to get home and found the supply wiped out... at multiple stores. Didn’t know what was going on, until the guy at the hardware store told me why the shelves were cleared.

    We would be ones that would need to stock up on water, our well water is awful to try and drink... something I took for granted when we lived in NC with well water so good we could bottle and sell it.

    You can buy masks online. Coordinate with your pediatricians so that you can get the tests.
  • psychod787psychod787 Member, Premium Posts: 3,751 Member Member, Premium Posts: 3,751 Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    puffbrat wrote: »
    We just got some extra dry beans, rice, and gallon jugs of water. We aren't really afraid of the virus, but more of the panicked shoppers that might clear the shelves, lol.

    Same for us. I'm not terribly concerned about the virus but of the surrounding panic that will cause empty store shelves and panic about people going out in public. We haven't bought anything yet, but we are going to stock up on things like oats, frozen fruits and veggies, frozen meat, boxed macaroni and cheese, and crackers. And probably flour and sugar so we can still make cookies :D

    Flour for making bread is at the top of my list :lol:

    I'm also going to buy canned tuna, peanut butter, rice, beans, shelf stable fruit, etc.

    As for P&G products, they make my brand of toilet paper, so I'm definitely buying a big thing of that.

    All my friends thought I was crazy when I invested my money in canned food and shotguns after the "crash". Who's laughing at me now? B)
    P.S. Has anyone else noted that this is how many zombie apocalypse movies start?

    I'm more a fan of apocalypse books (zombies not required), my favorite being "The Stand" by Stephen King. That did indeed start out with flu-like symptoms.

    Read the original "I am Legend", the "sickness" that turned people into vampires was from China.....
  • moonangel12moonangel12 Member, Premium Posts: 870 Member Member, Premium Posts: 870 Member
    I currently have 4 children knocked out with flu like symptoms... it’s been days of high fevers, crazy coughing, etc. I “joke” that it could be coronavirus, but we’ll never know since they can’t test for it yet! (Although I am seeing headlines that tests are making their way around). We are on the outskirts of DC, a “bedroom community” for people that work in the city, so lots of potential to bring it in. Haven’t been to the doctor, we homeschool so no need to expose them to anything else if the symptoms are treatable at home (we have been often enough to have the needed meds for her croup) so not 100% sure what it is.

    Wednesday is when it started, I thought my daughter was reacting to some bags of soil I bought - her cough started within minutes of being in the car with them. Super sensitive lungs, at age 8 she gets croup that shuts down her airways with any airborne irritant (no longer able to even swim in indoor chlorine pools). I went to buy a mask for her since we still had 45 minutes in the car to get home and found the supply wiped out... at multiple stores. Didn’t know what was going on, until the guy at the hardware store told me why the shelves were cleared.

    We would be ones that would need to stock up on water, our well water is awful to try and drink... something I took for granted when we lived in NC with well water so good we could bottle and sell it.

    They CAN test for it, the test gets sent to CDC in Atlanta. Those symptoms sound the same as COVID 19 symptoms are...I do hope they are okay. The cough and fever are the main thing, and having trouble breathing.

    In the Seattle area (according to the press conference today) the government labs are up to 200 tests per day, University of WA just today came online to do 200 more, they hope to gear up to a total of 2000 tests daily between the two labs within a couple days. Turnaround time on the test appears to be about one day.

    If you want you can go to KOMO News and watch the King County news conference.

    We're up to six deaths now. :(
    leggup wrote: »
    You can buy masks online. Coordinate with your pediatricians so that you can get the tests.
    Definitely something to check into then! I will call in the AM and see what I can find out. My husband and I have tried to “quarantine” ourselves the best we can in a small house with 6 people. Just waiting for that ball to drop for either one (or both!) of us...

    I hate the vicious cycle - go to the doctor for one thing, bring home strep, another visit for the strep, home with a stomach virus. One year, when they were little, we had 6+ weeks of back to back crud and it was awful!

    ETA: looking up symptoms, they definitely fit the mold based on what I read. Thankfully, my two children with the most susceptibility to lung/breathing issues are on their way out of it (there was a day or two of watching and listening very closely for anything more than what we are used to dealing with, and we have a pulse oximeter at home from when my youngest was on oxygen as a baby). The article I read said to call ahead, they may or may not have you come in based on symptom severity... and if so might have you come in a side door or something to avoid unnecessary exposure.
    edited March 2
  • Hollis100Hollis100 Member Posts: 1,085 Member Member Posts: 1,085 Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    While is is mainly on the West coast today in the USA one article said it will be spreading the month of March and April to the rest of the country. Thankfully spring time is coming.

    What does spring have to do with it?

    Somebody has probably answered -- I haven't read all the comments. Viruses survive better in cold temperatures. Here's one source about the flu virus:


    https://www.nih.gov/news-events/nih-research-matters/flu-virus-fortified-colder-weather

    "The researchers discovered that at temperatures slightly above freezing and below, the virus's lipid covering solidified into a gel. At about 70 degrees Fahrenheit, much of the lipid was still in gel form. At warmer temperatures, however, the gel melts to a liquid phase. At temperatures of about 105 degrees and higher, the coat was all in liquid form.

    The virus's rubbery outer coat, the researchers believe, allows it to withstand cooler temperatures and travel from person to person. In the respiratory tract, the body's warmth causes the covering to melt so that the virus can infect the cells of its new host.

    “Like an M&M in your mouth, the protective covering melts when it enters the respiratory tract,” explained Dr. Joshua Zimmerberg, chief of NICHD's Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Biophysics and the study's senior author. “It's only in this liquid phase that the virus is capable of entering a cell to infect it.”

    The liquid phase, presumably, isn't tough enough to protect the virus against the elements, and so the virus loses its ability to spread from person to person in warm air. As the weather warms in spring, the flu viruses dry out and weaken, and the flu season wanes."

  • mkculs13mkculs13 Member Posts: 372 Member Member Posts: 372 Member
    My shelves are stocked with healthy foods I never want to eat, and I told my daughter last fall that we should eat everything before going shopping again--I could probably easily go 2-3 weeks without buying food. BUT it's mostly certain types of things, dinner-related (to make things with TVP as the protein source). Not a big dairy user, so we could go without that. We'd get bored, probably, but that's ok. Mostly it has piled up b/c I really hate to cook. So if I am forced to, I am at least ready. Not worried, though.
  • whoami67whoami67 Member Posts: 232 Member Member Posts: 232 Member
    As always, my pantry and freezer are pretty well stocked. If I get exposed and have to quarantine myself for a couple weeks, I have enough food. Or the grocery store and restaurants deliver. If I'm home sick with it, i have the makings of chicken soup, Kleenex, advil and decongestant. I'm not especially worried.
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