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Why Is Food "Addiction" So Controversial?

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  • L1zardQueenL1zardQueen Member Posts: 8,645 Member Member Posts: 8,645 Member
    ccrdragon wrote: »
    ^^^ this

    And to add to it - I can happily eat my daily calories in cheese (and have done so)... I have also thrown out cheese because it has turned into a science experiment in the cheese drawer (green growing cheese, blech!). If it was truly addictive, the second part of that sentence should NEVER happen.

    Curious. Do you like blue cheese? I’ve thrown out blue cheese because it got too blue. Lol
  • gigius72gigius72 Member Posts: 183 Member Member Posts: 183 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    gigius72 wrote: »
    Lots of people rob grocery stores to get their cheese fix.

    That can be easily proven (it was also proven through MRI). Take a person who eats a lot of cheese and keep them 1 month without dairy, yet living cheese in their refrigerator.

    Yeah, pleasure centers in the brain light up on fMRI when contemplating tasty food, in receptive individuals. Also for things like petting cute kittens. Definitive: Petting kittens is addictive.

    I eat cheese daily. Pretty sure I could go a month with some in the fridge, but not eat it. Maybe not if it was a fully ripe well-made brie, or Cypress Grove Humboldt Fog, but y'know, just general cheese, sure, no problem. No dairy at all for a month? Hard for me to get enough protein given current habits, but as long as I get to eat anything else I want, probably could. Cheese in the fridge wouldn't make it harder, except the ones I mentioned. (<= this paragraph is just joking around.)

    What's being ignored here is that when people have sufficient motivation, they quit cheese ALL the time. Vegans exist and we managed to do it without checking ourselves into rehab centers. I also know some people who have stopped eating cheese due to various allergy/intolerance issues, they also all managed to do it by deciding "No more cheese for me."

    That most people eat cheese is not evidence that it's the equivalent of Oxycontin, it's just an indicator that for most people it's a tasty, easily obtained, affordable, and satisfying food that they have no real reason to give up.

    When I was teenager I used to be drunk every Friday Saturday and Sunday quit cold turkey, no rehab. I smoked 30 years almost two packs a day... No rehab. Joints? No rehab. So they are not addictive either.
    Being addicted to something it doesn't mean all your D2 receptors are gone. There are levels of dependence and they are different for everyone.
    edited January 28
  • ccrdragonccrdragon Member Posts: 2,944 Member Member Posts: 2,944 Member
    ccrdragon wrote: »
    ^^^ this

    And to add to it - I can happily eat my daily calories in cheese (and have done so)... I have also thrown out cheese because it has turned into a science experiment in the cheese drawer (green growing cheese, blech!). If it was truly addictive, the second part of that sentence should NEVER happen.

    Curious. Do you like blue cheese? I’ve thrown out blue cheese because it got too blue. Lol

    Yes, I do like blue cheese... never bought enough for it to go bad, tho.
  • qhob_89qhob_89 Member Posts: 94 Member Member Posts: 94 Member
    ccrdragon wrote: »
    ccrdragon wrote: »
    ^^^ this

    And to add to it - I can happily eat my daily calories in cheese (and have done so)... I have also thrown out cheese because it has turned into a science experiment in the cheese drawer (green growing cheese, blech!). If it was truly addictive, the second part of that sentence should NEVER happen.

    Curious. Do you like blue cheese? I’ve thrown out blue cheese because it got too blue. Lol

    Yes, I do like blue cheese... never bought enough for it to go bad, tho.

    Never heard of anyone buying enough heroin for it to go had either. 🤔 good enough science for me!
  • gigius72gigius72 Member Posts: 183 Member Member Posts: 183 Member
    gigius72 wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    gigius72 wrote: »
    Lots of people rob grocery stores to get their cheese fix.

    That can be easily proven (it was also proven through MRI). Take a person who eats a lot of cheese and keep them 1 month without dairy, yet living cheese in their refrigerator.

    Yeah, pleasure centers in the brain light up on fMRI when contemplating tasty food, in receptive individuals. Also for things like petting cute kittens. Definitive: Petting kittens is addictive.

    I eat cheese daily. Pretty sure I could go a month with some in the fridge, but not eat it. Maybe not if it was a fully ripe well-made brie, or Cypress Grove Humboldt Fog, but y'know, just general cheese, sure, no problem. No dairy at all for a month? Hard for me to get enough protein given current habits, but as long as I get to eat anything else I want, probably could. Cheese in the fridge wouldn't make it harder, except the ones I mentioned. (<= this paragraph is just joking around.)

    What's being ignored here is that when people have sufficient motivation, they quit cheese ALL the time. Vegans exist and we managed to do it without checking ourselves into rehab centers. I also know some people who have stopped eating cheese due to various allergy/intolerance issues, they also all managed to do it by deciding "No more cheese for me."

    That most people eat cheese is not evidence that it's the equivalent of Oxycontin, it's just an indicator that for most people it's a tasty, easily obtained, affordable, and satisfying food that they have no real reason to give up.

    When I was teenager I used to be drunk every Friday Saturday and Sunday quit cold turkey, no rehab. I smoked 30 years almost two packs a day... No rehab. Joints? No rehab. So they are not addictive either.
    Being addicted to something it doesn't mean all your D2 receptors are gone. There are levels of dependence and they are different for everyone.

    That a substance is addictive doesn't mean that every user will necessarily become addicted (there are a lot of people who casually drink, yet alcoholism is real). That someone is addicted doesn't necessarily mean that rehab is required to quit in all instances (I think we all know people who managed to quit using a substance they were addicted to without formal rehab). The point is that NOBODY goes to rehab for cheese ever, yet many people manage to eliminate it from their diet or moderate their consumption.

    You're making a really bold claim about cheese and there just isn't evidence to support that cheese addiction is an actual thing.

    You mean evidence that you or me are addicted? No. Like I was never addicted on joints. Evidence that it can be addictive? Yes. (I'll keep trying to find the study lol there are so many on nutrition). But this sums up chemically how it works.
    https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/is-cheese-addictive#your-brain-on-cheese
  • gigius72gigius72 Member Posts: 183 Member Member Posts: 183 Member
    gigius72 wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    gigius72 wrote: »
    Lots of people rob grocery stores to get their cheese fix.

    That can be easily proven (it was also proven through MRI). Take a person who eats a lot of cheese and keep them 1 month without dairy, yet living cheese in their refrigerator.

    Yeah, pleasure centers in the brain light up on fMRI when contemplating tasty food, in receptive individuals. Also for things like petting cute kittens. Definitive: Petting kittens is addictive.

    I eat cheese daily. Pretty sure I could go a month with some in the fridge, but not eat it. Maybe not if it was a fully ripe well-made brie, or Cypress Grove Humboldt Fog, but y'know, just general cheese, sure, no problem. No dairy at all for a month? Hard for me to get enough protein given current habits, but as long as I get to eat anything else I want, probably could. Cheese in the fridge wouldn't make it harder, except the ones I mentioned. (<= this paragraph is just joking around.)

    What's being ignored here is that when people have sufficient motivation, they quit cheese ALL the time. Vegans exist and we managed to do it without checking ourselves into rehab centers. I also know some people who have stopped eating cheese due to various allergy/intolerance issues, they also all managed to do it by deciding "No more cheese for me."

    That most people eat cheese is not evidence that it's the equivalent of Oxycontin, it's just an indicator that for most people it's a tasty, easily obtained, affordable, and satisfying food that they have no real reason to give up.

    When I was teenager I used to be drunk every Friday Saturday and Sunday quit cold turkey, no rehab. I smoked 30 years almost two packs a day... No rehab. Joints? No rehab. So they are not addictive either.
    Being addicted to something it doesn't mean all your D2 receptors are gone. There are levels of dependence and they are different for everyone.

    That a substance is addictive doesn't mean that every user will necessarily become addicted (there are a lot of people who casually drink, yet alcoholism is real). That someone is addicted doesn't necessarily mean that rehab is required to quit in all instances (I think we all know people who managed to quit using a substance they were addicted to without formal rehab). The point is that NOBODY goes to rehab for cheese ever, yet many people manage to eliminate it from their diet or moderate their consumption.

    You're making a really bold claim about cheese and there just isn't evidence to support that cheese addiction is an actual thing.

    Lol I only find articles describing it. I really can't find the study anymore. I think this is more complete (yes I didn't read it all lol)
    https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/agricultural-and-biological-sciences/casomorphin
  • ndj1979ndj1979 Member Posts: 29,148 Member Member Posts: 29,148 Member
    gigius72 wrote: »
    gigius72 wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    gigius72 wrote: »
    Lots of people rob grocery stores to get their cheese fix.

    That can be easily proven (it was also proven through MRI). Take a person who eats a lot of cheese and keep them 1 month without dairy, yet living cheese in their refrigerator.

    Yeah, pleasure centers in the brain light up on fMRI when contemplating tasty food, in receptive individuals. Also for things like petting cute kittens. Definitive: Petting kittens is addictive.

    I eat cheese daily. Pretty sure I could go a month with some in the fridge, but not eat it. Maybe not if it was a fully ripe well-made brie, or Cypress Grove Humboldt Fog, but y'know, just general cheese, sure, no problem. No dairy at all for a month? Hard for me to get enough protein given current habits, but as long as I get to eat anything else I want, probably could. Cheese in the fridge wouldn't make it harder, except the ones I mentioned. (<= this paragraph is just joking around.)

    What's being ignored here is that when people have sufficient motivation, they quit cheese ALL the time. Vegans exist and we managed to do it without checking ourselves into rehab centers. I also know some people who have stopped eating cheese due to various allergy/intolerance issues, they also all managed to do it by deciding "No more cheese for me."

    That most people eat cheese is not evidence that it's the equivalent of Oxycontin, it's just an indicator that for most people it's a tasty, easily obtained, affordable, and satisfying food that they have no real reason to give up.

    When I was teenager I used to be drunk every Friday Saturday and Sunday quit cold turkey, no rehab. I smoked 30 years almost two packs a day... No rehab. Joints? No rehab. So they are not addictive either.
    Being addicted to something it doesn't mean all your D2 receptors are gone. There are levels of dependence and they are different for everyone.

    That a substance is addictive doesn't mean that every user will necessarily become addicted (there are a lot of people who casually drink, yet alcoholism is real). That someone is addicted doesn't necessarily mean that rehab is required to quit in all instances (I think we all know people who managed to quit using a substance they were addicted to without formal rehab). The point is that NOBODY goes to rehab for cheese ever, yet many people manage to eliminate it from their diet or moderate their consumption.

    You're making a really bold claim about cheese and there just isn't evidence to support that cheese addiction is an actual thing.

    You mean evidence that you or me are addicted? No. Like I was never addicted on joints. Evidence that it can be addictive? Yes. (I'll keep trying to find the study lol there are so many on nutrition). But this sums up chemically how it works.
    https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/is-cheese-addictive#your-brain-on-cheese

    so given this logical fallacy every single substance and thing on the planet is addictive...glad we cleared that up...
  • gigius72gigius72 Member Posts: 183 Member Member Posts: 183 Member
    ndj1979 wrote: »
    gigius72 wrote: »
    gigius72 wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    gigius72 wrote: »
    Lots of people rob grocery stores to get their cheese fix.

    That can be easily proven (it was also proven through MRI). Take a person who eats a lot of cheese and keep them 1 month without dairy, yet living cheese in their refrigerator.

    Yeah, pleasure centers in the brain light up on fMRI when contemplating tasty food, in receptive individuals. Also for things like petting cute kittens. Definitive: Petting kittens is addictive.

    I eat cheese daily. Pretty sure I could go a month with some in the fridge, but not eat it. Maybe not if it was a fully ripe well-made brie, or Cypress Grove Humboldt Fog, but y'know, just general cheese, sure, no problem. No dairy at all for a month? Hard for me to get enough protein given current habits, but as long as I get to eat anything else I want, probably could. Cheese in the fridge wouldn't make it harder, except the ones I mentioned. (<= this paragraph is just joking around.)

    What's being ignored here is that when people have sufficient motivation, they quit cheese ALL the time. Vegans exist and we managed to do it without checking ourselves into rehab centers. I also know some people who have stopped eating cheese due to various allergy/intolerance issues, they also all managed to do it by deciding "No more cheese for me."

    That most people eat cheese is not evidence that it's the equivalent of Oxycontin, it's just an indicator that for most people it's a tasty, easily obtained, affordable, and satisfying food that they have no real reason to give up.

    When I was teenager I used to be drunk every Friday Saturday and Sunday quit cold turkey, no rehab. I smoked 30 years almost two packs a day... No rehab. Joints? No rehab. So they are not addictive either.
    Being addicted to something it doesn't mean all your D2 receptors are gone. There are levels of dependence and they are different for everyone.

    That a substance is addictive doesn't mean that every user will necessarily become addicted (there are a lot of people who casually drink, yet alcoholism is real). That someone is addicted doesn't necessarily mean that rehab is required to quit in all instances (I think we all know people who managed to quit using a substance they were addicted to without formal rehab). The point is that NOBODY goes to rehab for cheese ever, yet many people manage to eliminate it from their diet or moderate their consumption.

    You're making a really bold claim about cheese and there just isn't evidence to support that cheese addiction is an actual thing.

    You mean evidence that you or me are addicted? No. Like I was never addicted on joints. Evidence that it can be addictive? Yes. (I'll keep trying to find the study lol there are so many on nutrition). But this sums up chemically how it works.
    https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/is-cheese-addictive#your-brain-on-cheese

    so given this logical fallacy every single substance and thing on the planet is addictive...glad we cleared that up...

    Yes when they act as opioids.

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/agricultural-and-biological-sciences/casomorphin
  • ndj1979ndj1979 Member Posts: 29,148 Member Member Posts: 29,148 Member
    gigius72 wrote: »
    ndj1979 wrote: »
    gigius72 wrote: »
    gigius72 wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    gigius72 wrote: »
    Lots of people rob grocery stores to get their cheese fix.

    That can be easily proven (it was also proven through MRI). Take a person who eats a lot of cheese and keep them 1 month without dairy, yet living cheese in their refrigerator.

    Yeah, pleasure centers in the brain light up on fMRI when contemplating tasty food, in receptive individuals. Also for things like petting cute kittens. Definitive: Petting kittens is addictive.

    I eat cheese daily. Pretty sure I could go a month with some in the fridge, but not eat it. Maybe not if it was a fully ripe well-made brie, or Cypress Grove Humboldt Fog, but y'know, just general cheese, sure, no problem. No dairy at all for a month? Hard for me to get enough protein given current habits, but as long as I get to eat anything else I want, probably could. Cheese in the fridge wouldn't make it harder, except the ones I mentioned. (<= this paragraph is just joking around.)

    What's being ignored here is that when people have sufficient motivation, they quit cheese ALL the time. Vegans exist and we managed to do it without checking ourselves into rehab centers. I also know some people who have stopped eating cheese due to various allergy/intolerance issues, they also all managed to do it by deciding "No more cheese for me."

    That most people eat cheese is not evidence that it's the equivalent of Oxycontin, it's just an indicator that for most people it's a tasty, easily obtained, affordable, and satisfying food that they have no real reason to give up.

    When I was teenager I used to be drunk every Friday Saturday and Sunday quit cold turkey, no rehab. I smoked 30 years almost two packs a day... No rehab. Joints? No rehab. So they are not addictive either.
    Being addicted to something it doesn't mean all your D2 receptors are gone. There are levels of dependence and they are different for everyone.

    That a substance is addictive doesn't mean that every user will necessarily become addicted (there are a lot of people who casually drink, yet alcoholism is real). That someone is addicted doesn't necessarily mean that rehab is required to quit in all instances (I think we all know people who managed to quit using a substance they were addicted to without formal rehab). The point is that NOBODY goes to rehab for cheese ever, yet many people manage to eliminate it from their diet or moderate their consumption.

    You're making a really bold claim about cheese and there just isn't evidence to support that cheese addiction is an actual thing.

    You mean evidence that you or me are addicted? No. Like I was never addicted on joints. Evidence that it can be addictive? Yes. (I'll keep trying to find the study lol there are so many on nutrition). But this sums up chemically how it works.
    https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/is-cheese-addictive#your-brain-on-cheese

    so given this logical fallacy every single substance and thing on the planet is addictive...glad we cleared that up...

    Yes when they act as opioids.

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/agricultural-and-biological-sciences/casomorphin

    that link has about 20 different studies in it. Is there one in particular that you are pointing to, or are you just trying to post links to make the absurdity of your claims more relevant?
  • gigius72gigius72 Member Posts: 183 Member Member Posts: 183 Member
    ndj1979 wrote: »
    gigius72 wrote: »
    ndj1979 wrote: »
    gigius72 wrote: »
    gigius72 wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    gigius72 wrote: »
    Lots of people rob grocery stores to get their cheese fix.

    That can be easily proven (it was also proven through MRI). Take a person who eats a lot of cheese and keep them 1 month without dairy, yet living cheese in their refrigerator.

    Yeah, pleasure centers in the brain light up on fMRI when contemplating tasty food, in receptive individuals. Also for things like petting cute kittens. Definitive: Petting kittens is addictive.

    I eat cheese daily. Pretty sure I could go a month with some in the fridge, but not eat it. Maybe not if it was a fully ripe well-made brie, or Cypress Grove Humboldt Fog, but y'know, just general cheese, sure, no problem. No dairy at all for a month? Hard for me to get enough protein given current habits, but as long as I get to eat anything else I want, probably could. Cheese in the fridge wouldn't make it harder, except the ones I mentioned. (<= this paragraph is just joking around.)

    What's being ignored here is that when people have sufficient motivation, they quit cheese ALL the time. Vegans exist and we managed to do it without checking ourselves into rehab centers. I also know some people who have stopped eating cheese due to various allergy/intolerance issues, they also all managed to do it by deciding "No more cheese for me."

    That most people eat cheese is not evidence that it's the equivalent of Oxycontin, it's just an indicator that for most people it's a tasty, easily obtained, affordable, and satisfying food that they have no real reason to give up.

    When I was teenager I used to be drunk every Friday Saturday and Sunday quit cold turkey, no rehab. I smoked 30 years almost two packs a day... No rehab. Joints? No rehab. So they are not addictive either.
    Being addicted to something it doesn't mean all your D2 receptors are gone. There are levels of dependence and they are different for everyone.

    That a substance is addictive doesn't mean that every user will necessarily become addicted (there are a lot of people who casually drink, yet alcoholism is real). That someone is addicted doesn't necessarily mean that rehab is required to quit in all instances (I think we all know people who managed to quit using a substance they were addicted to without formal rehab). The point is that NOBODY goes to rehab for cheese ever, yet many people manage to eliminate it from their diet or moderate their consumption.

    You're making a really bold claim about cheese and there just isn't evidence to support that cheese addiction is an actual thing.

    You mean evidence that you or me are addicted? No. Like I was never addicted on joints. Evidence that it can be addictive? Yes. (I'll keep trying to find the study lol there are so many on nutrition). But this sums up chemically how it works.
    https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/is-cheese-addictive#your-brain-on-cheese

    so given this logical fallacy every single substance and thing on the planet is addictive...glad we cleared that up...

    Yes when they act as opioids.

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/agricultural-and-biological-sciences/casomorphin

    that link has about 20 different studies in it. Is there one in particular that you are pointing to, or are you just trying to post links to make the absurdity of your claims more relevant?

    Lol I found it. They removed the result. But it explains in details why they did the study.
    Wonder why they removed the result... Someone paid for it? 😂😂😂😂😂
    https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/study/NCT00360919
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Member Posts: 7,220 Member Member Posts: 7,220 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    gigius72 wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    gigius72 wrote: »
    Lots of people rob grocery stores to get their cheese fix.

    That can be easily proven (it was also proven through MRI). Take a person who eats a lot of cheese and keep them 1 month without dairy, yet living cheese in their refrigerator.

    Yeah, pleasure centers in the brain light up on fMRI when contemplating tasty food, in receptive individuals. Also for things like petting cute kittens. Definitive: Petting kittens is addictive.

    I eat cheese daily. Pretty sure I could go a month with some in the fridge, but not eat it. Maybe not if it was a fully ripe well-made brie, or Cypress Grove Humboldt Fog, but y'know, just general cheese, sure, no problem. No dairy at all for a month? Hard for me to get enough protein given current habits, but as long as I get to eat anything else I want, probably could. Cheese in the fridge wouldn't make it harder, except the ones I mentioned. (<= this paragraph is just joking around.)

    What's being ignored here is that when people have sufficient motivation, they quit cheese ALL the time. Vegans exist and we managed to do it without checking ourselves into rehab centers. I also know some people who have stopped eating cheese due to various allergy/intolerance issues, they also all managed to do it by deciding "No more cheese for me."

    That most people eat cheese is not evidence that it's the equivalent of Oxycontin, it's just an indicator that for most people it's a tasty, easily obtained, affordable, and satisfying food that they have no real reason to give up.

    When I was teenager I used to be drunk every Friday Saturday and Sunday quit cold turkey, no rehab. I smoked 30 years almost two packs a day... No rehab. Joints? No rehab. So they are not addictive either.
    Being addicted to something it doesn't mean all your D2 receptors are gone. There are levels of dependence and they are different for everyone.

    Dependence is not addiction. Habit is not dependence.

    Not necessarily.

    That's kind of the point of quite a few posts in this thread, actually.

    Yup.
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