If I cut out bread will that help loosing weight?

If I try cutting out bread will that help me loose weight and not be bloated anymore? I'm having a hard time loosing weight. I'm trying to incorporate more meat and chicken. I'm trying to loose a pound a week. Any suggestions? Thanks!
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Replies

  • AdamAthletic
    AdamAthletic Posts: 2,985 Member
    The things that you consume will have an affect on how you feel throughout your lifestyle but ultimately, to loose weight - all that is truly needed is a calorie deficit.

    That's not to say that you shouldn't assess the food and drinks that work for you, there are a lot of factors to take into account, not least the things you enjoy and the way foods make you feel.

    Ultimately, if a lifestyle doesn't feel maintainable - it isn't a realistic lifestyle change that's gonna enrich your life for the long haul!

    All the best!

    Adam
  • goldthistime
    goldthistime Posts: 3,214 Member
    molllyann wrote: »
    If I try cutting out bread will that help me loose weight and not be bloated anymore? I'm having a hard time loosing weight. I'm trying to incorporate more meat and chicken. I'm trying to loose a pound a week. Any suggestions? Thanks!

    Eating more meat and less starchy (or sweet) carbs has helped me stay within my calorie goal. But it's all relative, I'm still at 50% carbs and 20% protein.

  • cerise_noir
    cerise_noir Posts: 5,468 Member
    Bread by itself doesn't cause weight gain. Only eating more calories than you burn will cause it. You can over eat fruit, or meat, or anything else. If you feel the bread is the cause of your bloating, try not eating it for a few days and see if that actually is the cause. I have no idea what else you eat or drink that might cause that. Carbs/bread aren't evil, and women especially can suffer from lack of carbs (I know I do if I cut too hard). What kind of bread are you eating? White? Whole wheat? Sprouted grain? Flax? Rye? There's a lot of different kinds. I personally eat only sprouted grain bread (thinly sliced) because it provides a good amount of fiber and is very filling.

  • Aaron_K123
    Aaron_K123 Posts: 7,121 Member
    I'm going to be the one to tell you that a calorie is not always a calorie. I have cut down on carbs in general and have lost 23 pounds with out changing my calories at all. So I am saying yes, as long as you do not replace those carbs with other carbs but rather with healthy fats and protein you will see positive results on the scale.
    A calorie is simply a measurement of a chemical reaction within your body - fats, carbs and proteins all have a calorific value to them as a base minimum and then are generally surrounded by other content factors.
    Chicken might be majorly protein, however the substance coating the chicken will likely be carbohydrate based (BBQ glaze, etc - chicken skin mainly consists of fats).

    A calorie can never be anything other than a calorie because it isn't a nutrient, it's a way to measure the body's ability to displace energy.

    Excess energy that isn't used as ATP and released is stored by the body as added bodyfat.

    No mater how you choose to attain a calorie deficit, it will still be a calorie deficit regardless consistency of protein, fats or carbs.

    Body composition is an entirely different beast but calories are relatively simple when you see them as what they are.

    I think a calorie is a calorie but I also think it is fair to say that different people have different satiation dependent on what they eat and for some losing weight will become much easier if they substitute carbs for proteins and fats because they will feel much greater satiation on such a diet relative to their previous diet.

    That doesn't mean that 100 calories of bread isn't the same amount of energy as 100 calories of chicken, just that for some people 100 calories of chicken will be much more satisfying and will allow for a caloric deficit that is comfortable rather than hunger-inducing.

    I think really the answer is to experiment within your calorie limit that you have determined from your TDEE and the amount you want to lose and find out what types of foods satisfy you within that limit while still giving you your basic nutritional needs. Sometimes substituting more protein for refined carbs works well for that.
  • leanjogreen18
    leanjogreen18 Posts: 2,492 Member
    I'm losing weight and I eat bread - killer Dave 60 cal bread. Bloating is an issue for some folks with bread.
  • Aaron_K123 wrote: »
    I'm going to be the one to tell you that a calorie is not always a calorie. I have cut down on carbs in general and have lost 23 pounds with out changing my calories at all. So I am saying yes, as long as you do not replace those carbs with other carbs but rather with healthy fats and protein you will see positive results on the scale.

    Because no one has ever lost weight eating carbohydrates? Look, I'm happy that that worked for you but telling someone to not substitute carbs for other carbs because it won't work is only something you can say about yourself, you can't just apply that to other people. Perhaps doing that didn't work for you, that doesn't mean that it doesn't work.

    Don't even try that junk with me. I did NOT say anything along the lines of what you are trying to put in my mouth. Carbs ARE stored as fat when we eat more than we burn. FACT. Whether you like it or not.
  • Aaron_K123
    Aaron_K123 Posts: 7,121 Member
    johunt615 wrote: »
    I'm losing weight and I eat bread - killer Dave 60 cal bread. Bloating is an issue for some folks with bread.

    Ive heard this before. Out of curiosity why do people care about bloating? Its not fat, its just water retention...has no bearing on your health or fitness. So why do people care? They really want a particular number on their scale or its an aesthetic thing?
  • Lounmoun
    Lounmoun Posts: 8,427 Member
    Calorie deficit makes you lose weight.
    You might feel fuller and eat less if you are eating more protein, fats and fiber. Cutting down bread consumption could be helpful to you meeting your goals. Give it a try for a couple of weeks and see if you like it.
    It will still be the calorie deficit that causes you to lose weight though.

    If you aren't losing check your logging accuracy. Log everything. Use a food scale. Check that the database entries you use are correct.