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What are your unpopular opinions about health / fitness?

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Replies

  • lokihen
    lokihen Posts: 375 Member
    jdlobb wrote: »
    I have no idea what region woodchucks are native to. They just seem like critters you'd find in Oregon or Washington

    We have them in South Dakota though I've never seen them on a menu.
  • GottaBurnEmAll
    GottaBurnEmAll Posts: 7,722 Member
    earlnabby wrote: »
    jdlobb wrote: »
    I have no idea what region woodchucks are native to. They just seem like critters you'd find in Oregon or Washington

    They are definitely pests in Wisconsin.

    They're all over here. But we call them groundhogs. I hat to swerve to miss hitting one with the car yesterday. I'm in suburban New Jersey.
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 26,254 Member
    jdlobb wrote: »
    I would eat a woodchuck. I've never seen it as an option though. Where is this likely to be on the menu? Pacific Northwest?

    I believe woodchuck is an ethnic specialty amongst some subgroup in East Michigan - maybe Southeast Michigan - but I can't recall which one. Maybe an Eastern Europe derived subgroup?

    Note: I'm not saying that eating woodchucks came from the old country. I don't know. It may've arisen here. But I think there was a presentation about it in the foodways tent at the Great Lakes Folk Festival a few years back. I didn't go to that specific event, but think I saw it on the program listing.

    I don't know that they can be purveyed in restaurants. I think you need to know people.

    We certainly have plenty, plenty woodchucks (a.k.a. groundhogs) here. Anyone who wants some can have mine. They're undermining my pole barn floor, digging holes next to the house foundation, eating plants I like better than I like woodchucks. I think I usually have at least 2-4, and we're not talking acreage, just a suburban lot well under an acre. Get rid of one, another moves in.

    I'm such a poor shot. Sigh.
  • bpetrosky
    bpetrosky Posts: 3,911 Member
    TR0berts wrote: »
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Bry_Lander wrote: »
    Bry_Lander wrote: »
    I witnessed cake culturalism yesterday. I attended a meeting where one of the participants brought in donuts for his birthday, and wow, were people ever excited. People were coming and going from the meeting, and those joining late were told that it was Joe's birthday and that they better get a donut before it was too late.

    Being a guest and an unfamiliar face, I was asked to get a donut maybe 4-5 times by different people. Towards lunch, there seemed to be some anxiety that I was going to experience deep regret if I didn't claim a donut for myself. It didn't fit into my eating plan yesterday so I politely declined and no one overtly judged me. It seemed like maybe some felt sorry for me because I didn't know what I was missing and that I was foolishly declining an amazing opportunity, as if I was rejecting some rare and exotic food that I would never have the chance to experience again.

    I have several more meetings scheduled with this group in the future, so I think that I will just put a donut on a plate, cover it with a napkin, and leave it on the table during the meeting. I think that will make certain people feel better.

    This is hilarious--I am cracking up over this. Were they, like, Dunkin Donuts, or were they actually something special? Because if they were comparable to the doughnuts known as "Amish Crack" around here, I can understand the concern that you experience the awesomeness.

    Krispy Kreme - good donuts, but not exactly life-changing.

    Now there is an unpopular opinion.

    I hate Krispy Kreme donuts. To be fair, I don't care for donuts in general but I think they are the absolute worst I've ever had.

    I do too, but I was told they are different warm out of the oven, which admittedly we don't get here.



    Right out of the vat? They're pretty good, but not great. Other than that? They're OK, at best.

    I've never had a Krispy Kreme. Dunkin' was just okay. I grew up spoiled with local bakery donuts, and they remain my gold standard.

    I haven't had a donut in years.

    When I worked at the university, there was a place we used to get really, really, really good Danish. They were amazing.

    All the talk about donuts reminds me it's almost cider mill season here. And with cider mills comes apple cider donuts. Get them hot and they're amazing.

    tumblr_lt33evUZdF1qh0bbs.jpg
  • VintageFeline
    VintageFeline Posts: 6,771 Member
    Can we just have a chat about cider. You can't just go around calling apple juice cider. That's another way to confuse a Brit who doesn't know cider as anything but alcoholic.
  • VintageFeline
    VintageFeline Posts: 6,771 Member
    I know you call it hard cider but all cider is hard where I come from. Scrumping season soon too. Cider is a big deal in the south of England (I'm not a massive cider drinker, only have it once in a blue moon).
  • Carlos_421
    Carlos_421 Posts: 5,132 Member
    We call woodchucks groundhogs in Ohio and Kentucky.
    Also, cider and apple juice are different. Don't know how but they are. And cider is best served hot.
  • VintageFeline
    VintageFeline Posts: 6,771 Member
    http://www.worldwidewords.org/weirdwords/ww-scr2.htm

    I have never gone scrumping. Don't know that there are many apple orchards in Scotland. And from scrumping you get scrumpy (low rent, knock your socks off home brewed cider). We know how to drink on this little collection of alcohol soaked islands.

    We're also pretty much the birthplace of cider, thanks Romans! But I'm no aficionado given my lack of consumption. I think it's all in fashion and stuff again. Along with craft beers and ales and prosecco. And gin.
  • French_Peasant
    French_Peasant Posts: 1,638 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    jdlobb wrote: »
    I would eat a woodchuck. I've never seen it as an option though. Where is this likely to be on the menu? Pacific Northwest?

    I believe woodchuck is an ethnic specialty amongst some subgroup in East Michigan - maybe Southeast Michigan - but I can't recall which one. Maybe an Eastern Europe derived subgroup?

    Note: I'm not saying that eating woodchucks came from the old country. I don't know. It may've arisen here. But I think there was a presentation about it in the foodways tent at the Great Lakes Folk Festival a few years back. I didn't go to that specific event, but think I saw it on the program listing.

    I don't know that they can be purveyed in restaurants. I think you need to know people.

    We certainly have plenty, plenty woodchucks (a.k.a. groundhogs) here. Anyone who wants some can have mine. They're undermining my pole barn floor, digging holes next to the house foundation, eating plants I like better than I like woodchucks. I think I usually have at least 2-4, and we're not talking acreage, just a suburban lot well under an acre. Get rid of one, another moves in.

    I'm such a poor shot. Sigh.

    I think it was a popular Depression food.

    A woodchuck is nailing my kale right now. If I were desperate enough that I were depending on every scrap of my produce to live, and needed to kill the chuck, then I would probably be hungry enough to eat a chuck. I would also eat it if prepared by someone very skillful and knowledgeable with game, or say by a chef showcasing Native American traditional foods, which is a concept I keep reading about but haven't seen in action yet, regrettably.

    But I would not eat it from random guy at work who killed it with a trap and has also expressed a desire to bury his ex wife in the compost bin. Just skeeves me out a little.
  • jdlobb
    jdlobb Posts: 1,232 Member
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    We call woodchucks groundhogs in Ohio and Kentucky.
    Also, cider and apple juice are different. Don't know how but they are. And cider is best served hot.

    cider is unfiltered and unsweetened. If unpasteurized it will develop alcohol, even if refrigerated.

    apple juice is cider that's been filtered, pasteurized, and had sugar added.
  • VintageFeline
    VintageFeline Posts: 6,771 Member
    I asked Google. Apple cider is what we would probably call cloudy apple juice.
  • earlnabby
    earlnabby Posts: 8,177 Member
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    We call woodchucks groundhogs in Ohio and Kentucky.
    Also, cider and apple juice are different. Don't know how but they are. And cider is best served hot.

    3 parts cider, 1 part pure (unsweetened, undiluted) cranberry juice, a couple of cinnamon sticks and a few cloves. Heat and let simmer until the spices have infused the juices. If you need it sweeter, add a few spoonfuls of brown sugar.
  • jdlobb
    jdlobb Posts: 1,232 Member
    I asked Google. Apple cider is what we would probably call cloudy apple juice.

    that's it. you folks need to better distribute words

    Hard Cider
    Apple Juice
    Apple Cider

    Cider
    Apple Juice
    Cloudy Apple Juice


    Your language just needs a good re-balancing.
  • earlnabby
    earlnabby Posts: 8,177 Member
    edited September 2017
    jdlobb wrote: »
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    We call woodchucks groundhogs in Ohio and Kentucky.
    Also, cider and apple juice are different. Don't know how but they are. And cider is best served hot.

    cider is unfiltered and unsweetened. If unpasteurized it will develop alcohol, even if refrigerated.

    apple juice is cider that's been filtered, pasteurized, and had sugar added.

    Almost but not quite. Apple juice usually does not have added sugar, although it can. The main difference is filtration. Cider is not filtered and juice is. Both will be pasteurized if they are sold in stores (depending on state food safety regulations)

    http://www.mass.gov/agr/massgrown/cider_juice_difference.htm
  • cmriverside
    cmriverside Posts: 32,629 Member
    Hot cider is really good with Tuaca, sprinkle with cinnamon, then add a dollop of fresh whipped cream. It looks and tastes like Hot Apple Pie. I think that's what it was named, that was one of our drinks when I was a TGIF bartender. . .and when I still drank alcohol. Mm.
  • jdlobb
    jdlobb Posts: 1,232 Member
    earlnabby wrote: »
    jdlobb wrote: »
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    We call woodchucks groundhogs in Ohio and Kentucky.
    Also, cider and apple juice are different. Don't know how but they are. And cider is best served hot.

    cider is unfiltered and unsweetened. If unpasteurized it will develop alcohol, even if refrigerated.

    apple juice is cider that's been filtered, pasteurized, and had sugar added.

    Almost but not quite. Apple juice usually does not have added sugar, although it can. The main difference is filtration. Cider is not filtered and juice is. Both will be pasteurized if they are sold in stores (depending on state food safety regulations)

    http://www.mass.gov/agr/massgrown/cider_juice_difference.htm

    correct, any cider you buy in a store will be pasteurized. You can get it pasteurized, and it's delicious, at orchards and sometimes farmers markets. As I said. if it's unpasteurized it'll turn into booze, in pretty quick order. Which is one of the reasons that hard cider is popular for home brewers.
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