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What are your unpopular opinions about health / fitness?

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Replies

  • VintageFeline
    VintageFeline Posts: 6,771 Member
    bpetrosky wrote: »
    jdlobb wrote: »
    I asked Google. Apple cider is what we would probably call cloudy apple juice.

    that's it. you folks need to better distribute words

    Hard Cider
    Apple Juice
    Apple Cider

    Cider
    Apple Juice
    Cloudy Apple Juice


    Your language just needs a good re-balancing.

    Well no. We invented cider so we get to stipulate that it's always and forever alcoholic.

    There's apple juice from the supermarket, of varying qualities with cloudy being the fanciest but likely still pasteurised. Or you can buy apples/go to a hipster juice shop and get fresh/freshly squeezed apple juice.

    Calling any apple juice sans alcohol cider makes no sense whatsoever. Ask the Romans and native Britons who got together at the time and cemented the beverage as a staple drink.

    I think we can blame those Puritans you guys foisted over onto our continent for de-alcoholizing things. We're still dealing from the hangover those joyless gits left behind.

    More booze for us when they left. I hope you enjoyed your prohibition.
  • bpetrosky
    bpetrosky Posts: 3,911 Member
    bpetrosky wrote: »
    jdlobb wrote: »
    I asked Google. Apple cider is what we would probably call cloudy apple juice.

    that's it. you folks need to better distribute words

    Hard Cider
    Apple Juice
    Apple Cider

    Cider
    Apple Juice
    Cloudy Apple Juice


    Your language just needs a good re-balancing.

    Well no. We invented cider so we get to stipulate that it's always and forever alcoholic.

    There's apple juice from the supermarket, of varying qualities with cloudy being the fanciest but likely still pasteurised. Or you can buy apples/go to a hipster juice shop and get fresh/freshly squeezed apple juice.

    Calling any apple juice sans alcohol cider makes no sense whatsoever. Ask the Romans and native Britons who got together at the time and cemented the beverage as a staple drink.

    I think we can blame those Puritans you guys foisted over onto our continent for de-alcoholizing things. We're still dealing from the hangover those joyless gits left behind.

    More booze for us when they left. I hope you enjoyed your prohibition.

    Did not enjoy. I heard we shipped off the last of their joyless descendants to someplace befitting their temperament, like Utah or South Texas.
  • jdlobb
    jdlobb Posts: 1,232 Member
    bpetrosky wrote: »
    bpetrosky wrote: »
    jdlobb wrote: »
    I asked Google. Apple cider is what we would probably call cloudy apple juice.

    that's it. you folks need to better distribute words

    Hard Cider
    Apple Juice
    Apple Cider

    Cider
    Apple Juice
    Cloudy Apple Juice


    Your language just needs a good re-balancing.

    Well no. We invented cider so we get to stipulate that it's always and forever alcoholic.

    There's apple juice from the supermarket, of varying qualities with cloudy being the fanciest but likely still pasteurised. Or you can buy apples/go to a hipster juice shop and get fresh/freshly squeezed apple juice.

    Calling any apple juice sans alcohol cider makes no sense whatsoever. Ask the Romans and native Britons who got together at the time and cemented the beverage as a staple drink.

    I think we can blame those Puritans you guys foisted over onto our continent for de-alcoholizing things. We're still dealing from the hangover those joyless gits left behind.

    More booze for us when they left. I hope you enjoyed your prohibition.

    Did not enjoy. I heard we shipped off the last of their joyless descendants to someplace befitting their temperament, like Utah or South Texas.

    East Texas actually
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    bpetrosky wrote: »
    jdlobb wrote: »
    I asked Google. Apple cider is what we would probably call cloudy apple juice.

    that's it. you folks need to better distribute words

    Hard Cider
    Apple Juice
    Apple Cider

    Cider
    Apple Juice
    Cloudy Apple Juice


    Your language just needs a good re-balancing.

    Well no. We invented cider so we get to stipulate that it's always and forever alcoholic.

    There's apple juice from the supermarket, of varying qualities with cloudy being the fanciest but likely still pasteurised. Or you can buy apples/go to a hipster juice shop and get fresh/freshly squeezed apple juice.

    Calling any apple juice sans alcohol cider makes no sense whatsoever. Ask the Romans and native Britons who got together at the time and cemented the beverage as a staple drink.

    I think we can blame those Puritans you guys foisted over onto our continent for de-alcoholizing things. We're still dealing from the hangover those joyless gits left behind.

    Nope, the Puritan were boozy enough, and the Pilgrims brought beer on the Mayflower.

    The Methodists de-alcohol'd grape juice (originally for communion, I believe), blame them.
  • bpetrosky
    bpetrosky Posts: 3,911 Member
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    bpetrosky wrote: »
    jdlobb wrote: »
    I asked Google. Apple cider is what we would probably call cloudy apple juice.

    that's it. you folks need to better distribute words

    Hard Cider
    Apple Juice
    Apple Cider

    Cider
    Apple Juice
    Cloudy Apple Juice


    Your language just needs a good re-balancing.

    Well no. We invented cider so we get to stipulate that it's always and forever alcoholic.

    There's apple juice from the supermarket, of varying qualities with cloudy being the fanciest but likely still pasteurised. Or you can buy apples/go to a hipster juice shop and get fresh/freshly squeezed apple juice.

    Calling any apple juice sans alcohol cider makes no sense whatsoever. Ask the Romans and native Britons who got together at the time and cemented the beverage as a staple drink.

    I think we can blame those Puritans you guys foisted over onto our continent for de-alcoholizing things. We're still dealing from the hangover those joyless gits left behind.

    Nope, the Puritan were boozy enough, and the Pilgrims brought beer on the Mayflower.

    The Methodists de-alcohol'd grape juice (originally for communion, I believe), blame them.

    I stand corrected. Can we send them back instead?
  • middlehaitch
    middlehaitch Posts: 8,391 Member
    http://www.worldwidewords.org/weirdwords/ww-scr2.htm

    I have never gone scrumping. Don't know that there are many apple orchards in Scotland. And from scrumping you get scrumpy (low rent, knock your socks off home brewed cider). We know how to drink on this little collection of alcohol soaked islands.

    We're also pretty much the birthplace of cider, thanks Romans! But I'm no aficionado given my lack of consumption. I think it's all in fashion and stuff again. Along with craft beers and ales and prosecco. And gin.

    I used to drink scrumpy and 'Merrydown' in my youth in Cornwall. Delish.

    During my latest tour of England, Wales, and Scotland I did notice, and test as many as I could, there were a lot more micro- cideries around than 3-4 years ago. Overall the ciders being produced are much better than those in western Canada, which is also going through a cider resurgence.

    Being a lifelong cider drinker I was appalled at the sweet fizzy alcohol beverage sold in B C when I first arrived- it was apple country so cider was a natural off shoot. It is slightly improved, but not as good as that available in the U.K. (Most orchards are now wineries)

    I am also a gin drinker so enjoyed many of craft versions offered, so much more palatable for sipping than vodka.

    And to bridge everything- rhubarb gin and prosecco are heaven.

    If you haven't noticed this was a very boozy foody trip. (I only gained 1.2lbs and am still astounded.)

    Glad we have moved on to something I enjoy, chilli has never been my thing.

    Cheers, h.
  • VintageFeline
    VintageFeline Posts: 6,771 Member
    bpetrosky wrote: »
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    bpetrosky wrote: »
    jdlobb wrote: »
    I asked Google. Apple cider is what we would probably call cloudy apple juice.

    that's it. you folks need to better distribute words

    Hard Cider
    Apple Juice
    Apple Cider

    Cider
    Apple Juice
    Cloudy Apple Juice


    Your language just needs a good re-balancing.

    Well no. We invented cider so we get to stipulate that it's always and forever alcoholic.

    There's apple juice from the supermarket, of varying qualities with cloudy being the fanciest but likely still pasteurised. Or you can buy apples/go to a hipster juice shop and get fresh/freshly squeezed apple juice.

    Calling any apple juice sans alcohol cider makes no sense whatsoever. Ask the Romans and native Britons who got together at the time and cemented the beverage as a staple drink.

    I think we can blame those Puritans you guys foisted over onto our continent for de-alcoholizing things. We're still dealing from the hangover those joyless gits left behind.

    Nope, the Puritan were boozy enough, and the Pilgrims brought beer on the Mayflower.

    The Methodists de-alcohol'd grape juice (originally for communion, I believe), blame them.

    I stand corrected. Can we send them back instead?

    You can keep those too.
  • VintageFeline
    VintageFeline Posts: 6,771 Member
    edited September 2017
    http://www.worldwidewords.org/weirdwords/ww-scr2.htm

    I have never gone scrumping. Don't know that there are many apple orchards in Scotland. And from scrumping you get scrumpy (low rent, knock your socks off home brewed cider). We know how to drink on this little collection of alcohol soaked islands.

    We're also pretty much the birthplace of cider, thanks Romans! But I'm no aficionado given my lack of consumption. I think it's all in fashion and stuff again. Along with craft beers and ales and prosecco. And gin.

    I used to drink scrumpy and 'Merrydown' in my youth in Cornwall. Delish.

    During my latest tour of England, Wales, and Scotland I did notice, and test as many as I could, there were a lot more micro- cideries around than 3-4 years ago. Overall the ciders being produced are much better than those in western Canada, which is also going through a cider resurgence.

    Being a lifelong cider drinker I was appalled at the sweet fizzy alcohol beverage sold in B C when I first arrived- it was apple country so cider was a natural off shoot. It is slightly improved, but not as good as that available in the U.K. (Most orchards are now wineries)

    I am also a gin drinker so enjoyed many of craft versions offered, so much more palatable for sipping than vodka.

    And to bridge everything- rhubarb gin and prosecco are heaven.

    If you haven't noticed this was a very boozy foody trip. (I only gained 1.2lbs and am still astounded.)

    Glad we have moved on to something I enjoy, chilli has never been my thing.

    Cheers, h.

    White Lightening and Scrumpy Jack in my youth. And vodka. Though that was a grave mistake at 14.......And all those dreadful sweet bottled drinks. Merrydown was also a popular tipple though I don't recall if I ever had it. Maybe that means I did!

    We are taking boozing to the next level here at the moment. Not much else for it when it's cold and dreary 11 months of the year.
  • bpetrosky
    bpetrosky Posts: 3,911 Member
    bpetrosky wrote: »
    My unpopular opinion is the September is too *kitten* early for pumpkin spice anything.

    I know we're way past the pumpkin spice and on to cider...but I went to the supermarket today and if I bought just one of each pumpkin spice item I passed I would have dropped a couple hundred dollars easily. It's infested everything from cereal to coffee to ice cream to twinkies! The only thing I didn't see pumpkin spice in was a pumpkin pie!

    9vebjovw6eds.jpg
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    Article on cider in the US: http://drinks.seriouseats.com/2011/02/the-cider-press-the-lost-american-beverage.html
    America's love affair with hard cider stretches back to the first English settlers. Upon finding only inedible crabapples upon arrival, the colonists quickly requested apple seeds from England and began cultivating orchards. Grafting wood to produce proper cider apples arrived soon after and American cider production was well under way.

    While apple trees had little trouble taking to the New England soil, it was trickier to cultivate the barley and other grains required for the production of beer. So cider became the beverage of choice on the early American dinner table. Even the children drank Ciderkin, a weaker alcoholic drink made from soaking apple pomace in water.

    By the turn of the eighteenth century, New England was producing over 300,000 gallons of cider a year, and by midcentury, the average Massachusetts resident was consuming 35 gallons of cider a year. John Adams supposedly drank a tankard of cider every morning to settle his stomach.

    As the settlers began moving west, they brought along their love for cider. You've probably heard of John Chapman (better known as orchard-starter Johnny Appleseed). Chapman was actually a missionary for the Swedenborgian Church, who traveled just ahead of westbound settlers and grafted small, fenced-in nurseries of cider apple trees in the Great Lakes and Ohio River regions. Chapman visited the nurseries once or twice a year, but he left neighbors in charge to sell the saplings to the arriving settlers. By the end of the nineteenth century, it was not uncommon for to find a small cider orchard on the grounds of most homesteads.

    Cider's popularity began to wane in the early 1900s. Huge numbers of German and Eastern European immigrants brought with them a penchant for beer over cider. Plus, the soil in the Midwest was more barley-friendly, so beer production was easier than it had been. The advent of mechanical refrigeration also improved the quality of beer year round.

    While all this beer swilling did have an adverse effect on the cider industry, it did little compared to the devastating blow of Prohibition and the Volstead Act. While some breweries survived these dark times by producing a range of goods from sodas to refrigerated cabinets, cider orchards had less flexibility. In addition to outlawing alcoholic cider, the Volstead Act limited production of sweet cider to 200 gallons a year per orchard. Prohibitionists burned countless fields of trees to the ground and surviving orchards began cultivating sweeter (non-cider) apples out of necessity....
  • middlehaitch
    middlehaitch Posts: 8,391 Member
    Hahaha. I think we both started on the cider young, though Merrydown was post 16 when I left home and moved to Cornwall.
    I drank mostly cider and Guinness, sometimes mixed. The alca-pops hadn't been invented in the late 60's, thank goodness.

    Ooh I drink more in the summer- an afternoon of sweaty gardening and a cold anything x 3-4 goes down so well.

    Cheers, h.
  • VintageFeline
    VintageFeline Posts: 6,771 Member
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    Article on cider in the US: http://drinks.seriouseats.com/2011/02/the-cider-press-the-lost-american-beverage.html
    America's love affair with hard cider stretches back to the first English settlers. Upon finding only inedible crabapples upon arrival, the colonists quickly requested apple seeds from England and began cultivating orchards. Grafting wood to produce proper cider apples arrived soon after and American cider production was well under way.

    While apple trees had little trouble taking to the New England soil, it was trickier to cultivate the barley and other grains required for the production of beer. So cider became the beverage of choice on the early American dinner table. Even the children drank Ciderkin, a weaker alcoholic drink made from soaking apple pomace in water.

    By the turn of the eighteenth century, New England was producing over 300,000 gallons of cider a year, and by midcentury, the average Massachusetts resident was consuming 35 gallons of cider a year. John Adams supposedly drank a tankard of cider every morning to settle his stomach.

    As the settlers began moving west, they brought along their love for cider. You've probably heard of John Chapman (better known as orchard-starter Johnny Appleseed). Chapman was actually a missionary for the Swedenborgian Church, who traveled just ahead of westbound settlers and grafted small, fenced-in nurseries of cider apple trees in the Great Lakes and Ohio River regions. Chapman visited the nurseries once or twice a year, but he left neighbors in charge to sell the saplings to the arriving settlers. By the end of the nineteenth century, it was not uncommon for to find a small cider orchard on the grounds of most homesteads.

    Cider's popularity began to wane in the early 1900s. Huge numbers of German and Eastern European immigrants brought with them a penchant for beer over cider. Plus, the soil in the Midwest was more barley-friendly, so beer production was easier than it had been. The advent of mechanical refrigeration also improved the quality of beer year round.

    While all this beer swilling did have an adverse effect on the cider industry, it did little compared to the devastating blow of Prohibition and the Volstead Act. While some breweries survived these dark times by producing a range of goods from sodas to refrigerated cabinets, cider orchards had less flexibility. In addition to outlawing alcoholic cider, the Volstead Act limited production of sweet cider to 200 gallons a year per orchard. Prohibitionists burned countless fields of trees to the ground and surviving orchards began cultivating sweeter (non-cider) apples out of necessity....

    So basically..........Prohibition forced cider to become "soft" and you just went ahead and kept the name for whatever reason.

    Alcohol was also consumed by children and well, everyone, stretching back a long way because it was safer than water. Here in the UK it was mead and beer largely (though don't ask me the dates or how the two interact with each other). But it was much weaker than the beers and ales we drink today. But they drank a lot, a lot a lot. Like 12 pints a day or something.
  • VintageFeline
    VintageFeline Posts: 6,771 Member
    Hahaha. I think we both started on the cider young, though Merrydown was post 16 when I left home and moved to Cornwall.
    I drank mostly cider and Guinness, sometimes mixed. The alca-pops hadn't been invented in the late 60's, thank goodness.

    Ooh I drink more in the summer- an afternoon of sweaty gardening and a cold anything x 3-4 goes down so well.

    Cheers, h.

    I too am more likely to drink in summer though really i prefer to not drink my calories when not eating at maintenance so don't drink often. In winter/colder months I would have a glass or two of red wine on a Saturday evening in front of the telly but again, at the moment that's for maintenance.
  • earlnabby
    earlnabby Posts: 8,177 Member
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    bpetrosky wrote: »
    jdlobb wrote: »
    I asked Google. Apple cider is what we would probably call cloudy apple juice.

    that's it. you folks need to better distribute words

    Hard Cider
    Apple Juice
    Apple Cider

    Cider
    Apple Juice
    Cloudy Apple Juice


    Your language just needs a good re-balancing.

    Well no. We invented cider so we get to stipulate that it's always and forever alcoholic.

    There's apple juice from the supermarket, of varying qualities with cloudy being the fanciest but likely still pasteurised. Or you can buy apples/go to a hipster juice shop and get fresh/freshly squeezed apple juice.

    Calling any apple juice sans alcohol cider makes no sense whatsoever. Ask the Romans and native Britons who got together at the time and cemented the beverage as a staple drink.

    I think we can blame those Puritans you guys foisted over onto our continent for de-alcoholizing things. We're still dealing from the hangover those joyless gits left behind.

    Nope, the Puritan were boozy enough, and the Pilgrims brought beer on the Mayflower.

    The Methodists de-alcohol'd grape juice (originally for communion, I believe), blame them.

    The Presbyterians also were against anything that was fun.
  • French_Peasant
    French_Peasant Posts: 1,638 Member
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    Article on cider in the US: http://drinks.seriouseats.com/2011/02/the-cider-press-the-lost-american-beverage.html
    America's love affair with hard cider stretches back to the first English settlers. Upon finding only inedible crabapples upon arrival, the colonists quickly requested apple seeds from England and began cultivating orchards. Grafting wood to produce proper cider apples arrived soon after and American cider production was well under way.

    While apple trees had little trouble taking to the New England soil, it was trickier to cultivate the barley and other grains required for the production of beer. So cider became the beverage of choice on the early American dinner table. Even the children drank Ciderkin, a weaker alcoholic drink made from soaking apple pomace in water.

    By the turn of the eighteenth century, New England was producing over 300,000 gallons of cider a year, and by midcentury, the average Massachusetts resident was consuming 35 gallons of cider a year. John Adams supposedly drank a tankard of cider every morning to settle his stomach.

    As the settlers began moving west, they brought along their love for cider. You've probably heard of John Chapman (better known as orchard-starter Johnny Appleseed). Chapman was actually a missionary for the Swedenborgian Church, who traveled just ahead of westbound settlers and grafted small, fenced-in nurseries of cider apple trees in the Great Lakes and Ohio River regions. Chapman visited the nurseries once or twice a year, but he left neighbors in charge to sell the saplings to the arriving settlers. By the end of the nineteenth century, it was not uncommon for to find a small cider orchard on the grounds of most homesteads.

    Cider's popularity began to wane in the early 1900s. Huge numbers of German and Eastern European immigrants brought with them a penchant for beer over cider. Plus, the soil in the Midwest was more barley-friendly, so beer production was easier than it had been. The advent of mechanical refrigeration also improved the quality of beer year round.

    While all this beer swilling did have an adverse effect on the cider industry, it did little compared to the devastating blow of Prohibition and the Volstead Act. While some breweries survived these dark times by producing a range of goods from sodas to refrigerated cabinets, cider orchards had less flexibility. In addition to outlawing alcoholic cider, the Volstead Act limited production of sweet cider to 200 gallons a year per orchard. Prohibitionists burned countless fields of trees to the ground and surviving orchards began cultivating sweeter (non-cider) apples out of necessity....

    So basically..........Prohibition forced cider to become "soft" and you just went ahead and kept the name for whatever reason.

    Basically, yes. But I agree that cloudy juice is highly unsatisfactory terminology. Fresh cider might be a better term. We are constantly stocked with both and I can't say there has ever been any confusion between a request to bring me some cider vs. bring me a cider (the latter being a bottle).

    I do have to say, I owe England a debt of gratitude for a considerable portion of my education after a summer of study there in the early 90s. I went over drinking Bud Light and came back drinking a Guinness, Strongbow, Newcastle and Sam Smiths Nut Brown Ale. This was at a time when Heineken was seen as quite fancy here in the Midwest.


  • mathjulz
    mathjulz Posts: 5,526 Member
    I've been at Salt Lake Comic Con all day and am still catching up, so I'm sorry if we've moved on from chili.

    I always wondered why one of the local canned chili's was labeled as "Chili con carne with beans." Now I know. Not all people consider beans as one of the necessary (or even acceptable) ingredients of chili.

    And speaking of which, my mom always puts corn in her chili, as if it is part of what makes it chili. Every time I serve chili when she is here, she comments "no corn?" What I usually serve is the above referenced local canned chili with some regular beans added in (both to stretch it out for cheap - 3 cans of chili and 2 of beans will usually feed all my kids plus me and husband - and I like the way it tastes better), and she is always looked for the corn to add in. Is this an oddity of hers, or some local variation somewhere?
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