What are some of your unpopular opinions about food?

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Replies

  • pancakerunner
    pancakerunner Posts: 6,109 Member
    Bell peppers are really the only vegetable I can't tolerate.
  • Cassandraw3
    Cassandraw3 Posts: 1,214 Member
    nooshi713 wrote: »
    There is no need to put butter on pancakes. No need. Yuck.

    I dont like PB&J. Peanut butter on bread or jelly on bread is good, but not together.

    While I do like butter on my pancakes, I completely agree with the PB&J. I do NOT like that combination.
  • lemurcat2
    lemurcat2 Posts: 7,893 Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    Roasted Brussels sprouts are the best vegetable.

    Sometimes I think you are my twin, separated at birth. It's not my single favorite, but I get it infrequently enough that I will have some whenever it's available. I like them cut in half, flat side up, lightly sprayed with olive oil and Trader Joe's Everyday Seasoning fresh ground over them.

    Speaking of Trader Joe's and Brussels sprouts, it's my favorite time of year. They're selling the whole stalks very cheaply right now.

    I love the tasty suckers, but they do tend to be expensive.

    Hmm, now that I have a new vegetable garden bed, maybe I will grow some Brussels sprouts next year.

    /runs off to google something/

    Drat, wood chucks love anything in the cabbage family >.<

    I have all winter to plan my garden. We really need a garden thread wherever it would fit in.

    Okay, unless someone started it in another forum, we've got 6 people who say they would like to do this and no one did.

    I'm starting it in the food thing as it fits.

    Thanks!
  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 25,701 Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    Roasted Brussels sprouts are the best vegetable.

    Sometimes I think you are my twin, separated at birth. It's not my single favorite, but I get it infrequently enough that I will have some whenever it's available. I like them cut in half, flat side up, lightly sprayed with olive oil and Trader Joe's Everyday Seasoning fresh ground over them.

    Speaking of Trader Joe's and Brussels sprouts, it's my favorite time of year. They're selling the whole stalks very cheaply right now.

    I love the tasty suckers, but they do tend to be expensive.

    Hmm, now that I have a new vegetable garden bed, maybe I will grow some Brussels sprouts next year.

    /runs off to google something/

    Drat, wood chucks love anything in the cabbage family >.<

    I have all winter to plan my garden. We really need a garden thread wherever it would fit in.

    Okay, unless someone started it in another forum, we've got 6 people who say they would like to do this and no one did.

    I'm starting it in the food thing as it fits.

    Thanks!

    Here's the link: https://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/10708195/garden-thread
  • MoHousdon
    MoHousdon Posts: 8,719 Member
    MoHousdon wrote: »
    Hot dogs - take a questionable meat source, grind it down into a liquid-like emulsion, and then pack it in a cellulose casing of unknown material - and yet people seem to really love them.

    Cellulose...

    Was the last hot dog you had wrapped in a cellulose casing made out of cotton linters or wood pulp?

    Cellulose, a complex carbohydrate, or polysaccharide, consisting of 3,000 or more glucose units. The basic structural component of plant cell walls, cellulose comprises about 33 percent of all vegetable matter.

    I prefer my hot dogs encased in sheep intestines personally.
  • MoHousdon
    MoHousdon Posts: 8,719 Member
    I once accidentally used pepper jelly in a PB&J. The jelly was home made/canned and used a variety of peppers; the color made me think berry. It was surprisingly good.

    I should make one of those for my husband with his jalapeno bacon jam! He'd probably love that!
  • Rocknut53
    Rocknut53 Posts: 1,795 Member
    MoHousdon wrote: »
    Hot dogs - take a questionable meat source, grind it down into a liquid-like emulsion, and then pack it in a cellulose casing of unknown material - and yet people seem to really love them.

    Cellulose...

    Was the last hot dog you had wrapped in a cellulose casing made out of cotton linters or wood pulp?

    Just to add to the hot dog yuck factor: https://www.naturalnews.com/034917_sausages_casings_cowhides.html#
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 25,315 Member
    Beet greens are the very tastiest greens. Red amaranth second.

    I don't know whether those are unpopular opinions or not: IRL I hardly ever meet anyone who eats them.
  • lynn_glenmont
    lynn_glenmont Posts: 9,460 Member
    edited November 2018
    A substantiated opinion - the case against using GMO products is complete woo. Every major health organization around the world (CDC, WHO, EUPHA, etc) endorses them as safe. Purposefully avoiding GMO products is pretty much anti-science. A lot of common products avoid them because of public perception so we end up avoiding them without trying. There are reasons to hate Monsanto's business practices with respect to GMO crops. It's a real shame; GMO crops have more yield per acre, reducing the amount of farmland that needs to be cleared. They are more tolerant of drought, increasing the food supply in some areas that need it most. They are more bug resistant, decreasing the need for pesticides that often pollute water supplies.
    pinuplove wrote: »
    A substantiated opinion - the case against using GMO products is complete woo. Every major health organization around the world (CDC, WHO, EUPHA, etc) endorses them as safe. Purposefully avoiding GMO products is pretty much anti-science. A lot of common products avoid them because of public perception so we end up avoiding them without trying. There are reasons to hate Monsanto's business practices with respect to GMO crops. It's a real shame; GMO crops have more yield per acre, reducing the amount of farmland that needs to be cleared. They are more tolerant of drought, increasing the food supply in some areas that need it most. They are more bug resistant, decreasing the need for pesticides that often pollute water supplies.

    Agreed. I have zero issue with GMOs.

    There is no more rational basis for having a blanket opinion about all GMOs than there is for having a blanket opinion about all possible non GMO organisms. Some will be generally safe for all people, with a very low incidence of allergies. Some will be toxic. And there will be foods that fall somewhere between those extremes.
    The process of genetically modifying something doesn't make it automatically safe to eat, anymore than the fact that something isn't genetically modified (by humans through gene manipulation) makes it safe to eat.

    Please identify an example of a food that wasn't toxic before modification and is afterwards.

    The CDC, WHO, EUPHA and all the other major health organizations are making evidence based scientific conclusions. IMO, trusting science is more rational than dismissing it because I don't like blanket conclusions. There is no rational basis for assuming that modification makes something unsafe to eat when there is no evidence to support that. Science rarely if ever claims 100% certainty of anything only because it is logistically impossible to ever be 100% certain. That doesn't put an unproven hypothesis that isn't based on any evidence on equal footing.

    EDIT - Also, they don't just create some new GMO variant and start selling it as food without extensive testing. Mostly they are making sure there is a benefit to the modification, but they do test to make sure the food is acceptable (taste, texture and doesn't kill anyone) as well as achieving their objective (better, yield, more nutrition, higher tolerance to adverse conditions, world peace, etc).

    Each GMO food is its own individual case, so having "zero issues" with GMOs is like having "zero issues" with all potential foods There is nothing magical about the GMO process that guarantees that all foods will be safe for all people. I'm perfectly happy to eat GMOs if they have been well-vetted AND if I am allowed access to information about what the modification is. I'm about basing judgments on as much information as possible, so don't try to insinuate that I'm anti-science or anti-evidence. If the evidence is there, there shouldn't be any objection to letting consumers have access to it in each case.

    What if they've inserted protein-generating sequences from wheat into a tomato, and I have celiac disease?

    I forget the details, but there was a GMO fish that was being brought to market, and they had subbed some gene sequences from a fish that reaches adult weight more quickly than the original fish they were modifying. I would not eat that UNTIL I was able to obtain further information about the fish they were getting the fast-growth genes from. It was a fish that was also commonly eaten by humans, so for me, it was not a concern.

    Given the number of drugs that have been approved and brought to market with horrific consequences during my lifetime, due to inadequate vetting, I reserve the right to make my own judgment about each instance of something new that has been "extensively tested" (in the case of GMOs, these extensive tests appear to be on the order of a year or two, which is hardly enough to judge long-term effects).

    Long winded way of saying that no, you can't identify a single instance of the issue that you are worried about. But since I can't prove the sky isn't falling I guess you might as well wear the tin foil hat for protection in case it is.

    You are taking the very unscientific position that if something is produced by a particular process, it must be healthful, regardless of what ingredients were used to produce it. I think you better check your own headgear.

    And the headgear of the CDC, WHO, EUPHA and other major health organization scientists, who I trust more than other internet posters and that should be trusted more than me. They all endorse GMO. Many GMO crops would allow us to feed more people using less resources. But the fear of them is too widespread, and even though that fear isn't based on hard science (it actually discredits hard science), farmers and merchants are reluctant to use them. Less people would die if it weren't for the irrational fear of GMO crops.

    No, they endorse individual GMO foods/crops, or they endorse GMO as a useful way to quickly develop crops that grow better than conventional crops under certain adverse conditions or have a higher yield. There is no scientific basis for saying that because GMO Foods (1 to X) are safe, than then all GMO Foods (x+1 to infinity) will be safe. You really seem to be missing the point.


    Edited to fix typo.
  • lynn_glenmont
    lynn_glenmont Posts: 9,460 Member
    Machka9 wrote: »
    glassyo wrote: »
    Can we judge in here because....not liking oreos??? No point to chocolate milk??? I just died a little inside. :(

    Oreos are a very boring cookie.

    Chocolate milk makes me sick. I'd much rather eat a chocolate bar.

    I don't get drinking chocolate milk with a meal, which was mostly what I saw as a kid -- other kids buying chocolate milk with their lunches, or friends having chocolate milk with lunch or dinner at home. The idea of drinking something chocolatey and sweet to wash down your meatloaf or tuna casserole was just absolutely gross to me. And if it's not as part of a meal, there are so many tastier treats than chocolate milk.

    But you're so wrong on Oreos. Of course, they should be dunked in coffee.
  • PaperDoll_
    PaperDoll_ Posts: 33,067 Member
    nooshi713 wrote: »
    There is no need to put butter on pancakes. No need. Yuck.

    I dont like PB&J. Peanut butter on bread or jelly on bread is good, but not together.

    I agree with not putting butter on pancakes.

    I used to agree with you about the PB&J as well, but we always got it with grape jelly as kids and I hated that. Since trying it with strawberry jam, I like them now. :)
  • lynn_glenmont
    lynn_glenmont Posts: 9,460 Member
    PaperDoll_ wrote: »
    nooshi713 wrote: »
    There is no need to put butter on pancakes. No need. Yuck.

    I dont like PB&J. Peanut butter on bread or jelly on bread is good, but not together.

    I agree with not putting butter on pancakes.

    I used to agree with you about the PB&J as well, but we always got it with grape jelly as kids and I hated that. Since trying it with strawberry jam, I like them now. :)

    No butter needed on corn bread or biscuits either. Or even a good roll. I do like it on toast or homemade bread.
  • Keto_Vampire
    Keto_Vampire Posts: 1,679 Member
    edited November 2018
    cottage cheese > skyr > greek yogurt

    (picky about my cottage cheese brands tho)

    Lol, that's like half my diet...but cottage cheese > skyr ~/= greek yogurt
    Only cottage cheeses I prefer = Breakstone 4% (small or large curd) & Friendship 4% (seems like a regional brand; never had this in southern US states)...often store brands are noticeably more "gummy" with the arabic gum, carrageenan, xanthan gum, & other thickeners
  • lemurcat2
    lemurcat2 Posts: 7,893 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Beet greens are the very tastiest greens. Red amaranth second.

    I don't know whether those are unpopular opinions or not: IRL I hardly ever meet anyone who eats them.

    I love beet greens. I only get them when I get beets from the green market or my farm share, though.