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Peloton ad

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  • Carlos_421Carlos_421 Posts: 5,074Member Member Posts: 5,074Member Member
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    Gisel2015 wrote: »
    I love it, kudos to him!!!

    Peloton husband, despite the controversy, gifts real-life girlfriend a ... Peloton bike

    When life imitates art ...

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/entertainment/celebrities/2019/12/26/peloton-husband-gives-girlfriend-exercise-bike-christmas/2750142001/

    My money is on the idea Peloton provided the bike free in exchange for the Instagram post.

    If that were the case, he'd have been obligated to disclose as much (or at least tag the post as #ad or #sponsored) in the post.

    Maybe they are supposed to but it's the internet how many times do you think rules are broken?

    Instagram/Facebook/YouTube etc. all monitor that kind of thing in a big way (and those who make or support their living through social media know it).
    Chances are a small/beginner influencer could be ignorant to the rules or try to break them and not get caught but anyone with prominence is most likely going to get busted.
    A professional actor/model with as much notoriety as peloton husband is going to fall into the latter category (the peloton marketing department would be aware and watching that as well).

    If the social media platforms are so good at monitoring this behavior, how is it that the FTC still finds violators to bring cases against or send warning letters to? (And they don't have the resources to take action on every instance.)

    https://search.usa.gov/search?query=disclosure+by+social+media+influencer&submit.x=0&submit.y=0&affiliate=ftc_prod

    How is the FTC bringing cases against violators if this kind of thing isn't being policed?

    Speaking from experience (I work with paid sponsorships on YouTube and Instagram), I have enormous doubts that the instagram post in question wouldn't have an #ad disclosure if the bike was provided by Peloton.
  • lynn_glenmontlynn_glenmont Posts: 7,551Member Member Posts: 7,551Member Member
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    Gisel2015 wrote: »
    I love it, kudos to him!!!

    Peloton husband, despite the controversy, gifts real-life girlfriend a ... Peloton bike

    When life imitates art ...

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/entertainment/celebrities/2019/12/26/peloton-husband-gives-girlfriend-exercise-bike-christmas/2750142001/

    My money is on the idea Peloton provided the bike free in exchange for the Instagram post.

    If that were the case, he'd have been obligated to disclose as much (or at least tag the post as #ad or #sponsored) in the post.

    Maybe they are supposed to but it's the internet how many times do you think rules are broken?

    Instagram/Facebook/YouTube etc. all monitor that kind of thing in a big way (and those who make or support their living through social media know it).
    Chances are a small/beginner influencer could be ignorant to the rules or try to break them and not get caught but anyone with prominence is most likely going to get busted.
    A professional actor/model with as much notoriety as peloton husband is going to fall into the latter category (the peloton marketing department would be aware and watching that as well).

    If the social media platforms are so good at monitoring this behavior, how is it that the FTC still finds violators to bring cases against or send warning letters to? (And they don't have the resources to take action on every instance.)

    https://search.usa.gov/search?query=disclosure+by+social+media+influencer&submit.x=0&submit.y=0&affiliate=ftc_prod

    How is the FTC bringing cases against violators if this kind of thing isn't being policed?

    Speaking from experience (I work with paid sponsorships on YouTube and Instagram), I have enormous doubts that the instagram post in question wouldn't have an #ad disclosure if the bike was provided by Peloton.

    There's a difference between your earlier position that X doesn't happen because it's against the rules and entities are monitoring for it and your current implied position that catching X cases indicates there is policing and therefore there are no X + n cases that aren't being caught or triggering enforcement.
  • Carlos_421Carlos_421 Posts: 5,074Member Member Posts: 5,074Member Member
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    Gisel2015 wrote: »
    I love it, kudos to him!!!

    Peloton husband, despite the controversy, gifts real-life girlfriend a ... Peloton bike

    When life imitates art ...

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/entertainment/celebrities/2019/12/26/peloton-husband-gives-girlfriend-exercise-bike-christmas/2750142001/

    My money is on the idea Peloton provided the bike free in exchange for the Instagram post.

    If that were the case, he'd have been obligated to disclose as much (or at least tag the post as #ad or #sponsored) in the post.

    Maybe they are supposed to but it's the internet how many times do you think rules are broken?

    Instagram/Facebook/YouTube etc. all monitor that kind of thing in a big way (and those who make or support their living through social media know it).
    Chances are a small/beginner influencer could be ignorant to the rules or try to break them and not get caught but anyone with prominence is most likely going to get busted.
    A professional actor/model with as much notoriety as peloton husband is going to fall into the latter category (the peloton marketing department would be aware and watching that as well).

    If the social media platforms are so good at monitoring this behavior, how is it that the FTC still finds violators to bring cases against or send warning letters to? (And they don't have the resources to take action on every instance.)

    https://search.usa.gov/search?query=disclosure+by+social+media+influencer&submit.x=0&submit.y=0&affiliate=ftc_prod

    How is the FTC bringing cases against violators if this kind of thing isn't being policed?

    Speaking from experience (I work with paid sponsorships on YouTube and Instagram), I have enormous doubts that the instagram post in question wouldn't have an #ad disclosure if the bike was provided by Peloton.

    There's a difference between your earlier position that X doesn't happen because it's against the rules and entities are monitoring for it and your current implied position that catching X cases indicates there is policing and therefore there are no X + n cases that aren't being caught or triggering enforcement.

    Not only did I not say that it doesn't happen, I said that it does.
    My earlier position was not that it doesn't happen but that it's highly unlikely that it happened here.
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    Gisel2015 wrote: »
    I love it, kudos to him!!!

    Peloton husband, despite the controversy, gifts real-life girlfriend a ... Peloton bike

    When life imitates art ...

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/entertainment/celebrities/2019/12/26/peloton-husband-gives-girlfriend-exercise-bike-christmas/2750142001/

    My money is on the idea Peloton provided the bike free in exchange for the Instagram post.

    If that were the case, he'd have been obligated to disclose as much (or at least tag the post as #ad or #sponsored) in the post.

    Maybe they are supposed to but it's the internet how many times do you think rules are broken?

    Instagram/Facebook/YouTube etc. all monitor that kind of thing in a big way (and those who make or support their living through social media know it).
    Chances are a small/beginner influencer could be ignorant to the rules or try to break them and not get caught but anyone with prominence is most likely going to get busted.
    A professional actor/model with as much notoriety as peloton husband is going to fall into the latter category (the peloton marketing department would be aware and watching that as well).

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