Myfitnesspal

Message Boards Recipes
You are currently viewing the message boards in:

What do your meals look like (show me pictures)....

19439449469489491011

Replies

  • Madison9776Madison9776 Member Posts: 51 Member Member Posts: 51 Member
    Lemon garlic cod with roasted asparagus and rice
    iny7cq5zynje.jpeg
  • acpgeeacpgee Member Posts: 5,853 Member Member Posts: 5,853 Member
    Txuleton steak, oven fries, turkish peppers cooked like pimiento padrons, green salad. Sauces were compound butter for the steak pulled out of the freezer, leftover onion gravy, ketchup mixed with toum for the fries.

    Txuleton steaks are ribeyes traditional in Basqueland from retired dairy cows that have been put out to pasture for a year to fatten up and de-stress. Meat has a stronger gamey taste, similar to venison and not tougher than regular ribeye because the older meat was very well marbled. I am going to stick to eating retired dairy cows, as it strikes me as a more sustainable way to eat beef.

    Dessert was vanilla ice cream, with miso caramel sauce, toasted sesame, dehydrated sweet potato chips. chopped candied ginger.

    h8oawqleevur.jpeg
    utowl31box82.jpeg
  • acpgeeacpgee Member Posts: 5,853 Member Member Posts: 5,853 Member
    Tapas. Turkish peppers cooked like pimientos padron leftover from last night, Spanish tortilla leftover from lunch, Portuguese marinated carrots, chickpea flour air fries with tomato sauce, habas con jamon, albondigas made by the hubby.

    3t8kkkqkwgan.jpeg
  • angelshockercupcakesangelshockercupcakes Member, Premium Posts: 1 Member Member, Premium Posts: 1 Member
    Egg Sammy with salami, turkey breast, and swiss cheese and laughing cow cheese wedge


  • Noreenmarie1234Noreenmarie1234 Member Posts: 6,533 Member Member Posts: 6,533 Member
    Greek chicken and potatoes paired with baby carrots
    7f32doo4oulo.jpeg

    Omg drool. That looks incredible. Especially the roasted carrots.
  • tamarastrahantamarastrahan Member Posts: 17 Member Member Posts: 17 Member
    Protein pancakes and strawberries, chimichurri beans salad, and pasta with herbed chicken, summer squash, onions, and tomato. My main food for today.
    0hkl3whps66c.jpg
    9g11kn2j758s.jpg
    x9qkwrzpr7x3.jpg
  • kcmcbeekcmcbee Member Posts: 176 Member Member Posts: 176 Member
    A 2 egger with red pepper, onions and salsa.aqot80v4ly2n.jpeg
  • MistressPiMistressPi Member Posts: 513 Member Member Posts: 513 Member
    acpgee wrote: »
    MistressPi wrote: »
    acpgee wrote: »
    Sous vide chicken breast, roast potatoes, sauteed asparagus. Leftover onion gravy.

    That looks great. Did you brine the chicken before cooking it? I don't have a sous vide set up, but a friend of mine raves about it...I'm just reluctant to get any more kitchen gadgets/appliances... I think I must have fifteen different ways to cook chicken with the stuff I already have. :)

    I dry brine instead of doing a traditional brine which gives great results with less work.
    https://www.seriouseats.com/2019/12/how-to-dry-brine.html

    The modern sous vide set ups don't require a lot of room to store. Mine is a stick that is 13 inches long and 2 inches in diamter. So it equivalent to a handheld stick blender in terms of space it takes up in a drawer.

    The things I always cook sous vide nowadays are chicken breasts (best silky texture because at a slow cook with a controlled temperature is safe to take chicken it up to just 63C instead of the 72C it normally needs to be safe), thick steaks (you can get edge to edge perfect medium rare instead of well done on the edges and rare in the centre). For tender cuts I do an hour or so, so it does take more time.

    The other things I find sous vide useful for is tougher roasts such as silverside (eye of round in the US, I think) and pork tenderloin. Also good for getting firmer texture on cheap shin and braising meats, because I don't like that stringy pulled texture of stewed meats. But tough cuts need to go for 24 hours or so before searing.

    Thank you for the detailed response. Do you prefer the texture of sous vide chicken breast as compared to poaching it? My friend raves about how good shrimp and other seafood turn out via sous vide. It's good to know that the set up is so much more compact and I'm guessing less expensive, too, than it was when it first came out.

    Love seeing all your meals. So much care and attention to detail, inventive and creative.
  • VegjoyPVegjoyP Member Posts: 1,552 Member Member Posts: 1,552 Member
    73nchkwo9fth.jpg
    ld2vzclimbm0.jpg
    obc5t4vmvkic.jpg
    skrlon1li1k1.jpg
    y7v193cza33x.jpg
    voo50xusdvif.jpg

    The last one is Silken Tofu, cacaonpowder, connamon and stevia
    edited August 2020
  • acpgeeacpgee Member Posts: 5,853 Member Member Posts: 5,853 Member
    MistressPi wrote: »
    acpgee wrote: »
    MistressPi wrote: »
    acpgee wrote: »
    Sous vide chicken breast, roast potatoes, sauteed asparagus. Leftover onion gravy.

    That looks great. Did you brine the chicken before cooking it? I don't have a sous vide set up, but a friend of mine raves about it...I'm just reluctant to get any more kitchen gadgets/appliances... I think I must have fifteen different ways to cook chicken with the stuff I already have. :)

    I dry brine instead of doing a traditional brine which gives great results with less work.
    https://www.seriouseats.com/2019/12/how-to-dry-brine.html

    The modern sous vide set ups don't require a lot of room to store. Mine is a stick that is 13 inches long and 2 inches in diamter. So it equivalent to a handheld stick blender in terms of space it takes up in a drawer.

    The things I always cook sous vide nowadays are chicken breasts (best silky texture because at a slow cook with a controlled temperature is safe to take chicken it up to just 63C instead of the 72C it normally needs to be safe), thick steaks (you can get edge to edge perfect medium rare instead of well done on the edges and rare in the centre). For tender cuts I do an hour or so, so it does take more time.

    The other things I find sous vide useful for is tougher roasts such as silverside (eye of round in the US, I think) and pork tenderloin. Also good for getting firmer texture on cheap shin and braising meats, because I don't like that stringy pulled texture of stewed meats. But tough cuts need to go for 24 hours or so before searing.

    Thank you for the detailed response. Do you prefer the texture of sous vide chicken breast as compared to poaching it? My friend raves about how good shrimp and other seafood turn out via sous vide. It's good to know that the set up is so much more compact and I'm guessing less expensive, too, than it was when it first came out.

    Love seeing all your meals. So much care and attention to detail, inventive and creative.

    I've never poached chicken breasts so I am afraid I can't compare to sous vide. Also keep in mind that in the early days people said you needed a vacuum packer too. Most people i know just use a good quality ziplock bag. I never wanted a sous vide before because I had only seen the early generation models which were really bulky. Nowadays it is just a heating element that you clip into a pasta pan that heats and circulates the water at a controlled temperature.

    That said, although my husband likes chicken breasts and steaks sous vide, he prefers braising meat braised. The sous vide makes cheap cuts tender after a long slow cook but it retains a firm steak like texture. My husband thinks that curries and stews are superior when they develop that stringy pulled texture that holds more sauce.

    I haven't tried seafood.
  • acpgeeacpgee Member Posts: 5,853 Member Member Posts: 5,853 Member
    Dinner out. I had a rare flatiron and the hubby had a cheeseburger. Creamed spinach and beef drippings chips on the side.
    64rhyfp10hjs.jpeg
  • paxot69915paxot69915 Member Posts: 14 Member Member Posts: 14 Member
    Must be Monday.

    5cx9xiadf7u3.jpg
  • PAPYRUS3PAPYRUS3 Member Posts: 9,398 Member Member Posts: 9,398 Member
    @VegjoyP - your last post was so simple - but looked so yumm...as I'm sure it was:)
    edited August 2020
  • VegjoyPVegjoyP Member Posts: 1,552 Member Member Posts: 1,552 Member
    PAPYRUS3 wrote: »
    @VegjoyP - your last post was so simple - but looked so yumm...as I'm sure it was:)
    Thank you💙
    It makes me happy and feel good 🙂
    edited August 2020
  • swirlybeeswirlybee Member Posts: 494 Member Member Posts: 494 Member
    A very lose interpretation of kedgeree with smoked salmon and assorted veggies. Only 520 calories for my serving.
  • weatherking2019weatherking2019 Member Posts: 928 Member Member Posts: 928 Member
    aa0hmp51nq5e.jpg
    breakfast omlette
    9t333ry32tb6.jpg
    lunch
    iudcgshivqpl.jpg
    dinner
Sign In or Register to comment.