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For the love of Produce...

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  • acpgeeacpgee Member Posts: 5,948 Member Member Posts: 5,948 Member
  • acpgeeacpgee Member Posts: 5,948 Member Member Posts: 5,948 Member
  • SuzanneC1l9zzSuzanneC1l9zz Member Posts: 147 Member Member Posts: 147 Member
    I'd definitely be breaking out google lens for that one. Who are you and how do I get you in my stomach?
  • annk18annk18 Member Posts: 79 Member Member Posts: 79 Member
    Tried romanesco broccoli for the first time in the early fall when I found it at my local farmers market. It's not only pretty but it tastes delightful.
  • ridiculous59ridiculous59 Member Posts: 2,178 Member Member Posts: 2,178 Member
    annk18 wrote: »
    Tried romanesco broccoli for the first time in the early fall when I found it at my local farmers market. It's not only pretty but it tastes delightful.

    I don't know if I would have bought it if I saw it at the farmers market. That's the great thing about my box-a-week; it forces me to try new things. In fact, I used the "build-a-box" option one week to choose my own contents and then was so disappointed because I got exactly what I wanted and there were no surprises 😆 And you're right, it does taste delightful. Like cauliflower, but firmer.
  • snowflake954snowflake954 Member Posts: 6,559 Member Member Posts: 6,559 Member
    I met this interesting fella for the first time today in my box-a-week of veggies:

    30tzf4397jk1.jpg

    Its called Romanesco broccoli and of course I roasted it like I do most veggies. Quite yummy.

    I live in Rome and it's called Romanesco because it grows in the countryside around Rome. Here, it is a staple.
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Member Posts: 7,322 Member Member Posts: 7,322 Member
    annk18 wrote: »
    Tried romanesco broccoli for the first time in the early fall when I found it at my local farmers market. It's not only pretty but it tastes delightful.

    I don't know if I would have bought it if I saw it at the farmers market. That's the great thing about my box-a-week; it forces me to try new things. In fact, I used the "build-a-box" option one week to choose my own contents and then was so disappointed because I got exactly what I wanted and there were no surprises 😆 And you're right, it does taste delightful. Like cauliflower, but firmer.

    That's what I liked too when I first started getting my farm share box some years ago. And it forced me to learn to cook with what veg were on hand (even if it was just greens, greens, more greens, and garlic, early in the season).

    I actually prefer regular broccoli or cauliflower to romanesco, but it is pretty.
  • annk18annk18 Member Posts: 79 Member Member Posts: 79 Member
    Since finding this thread, I always try to look for something new each time I'm at the farmer's market. The vendors are very helpful and can often describe what something tastes like and how to cook it. I'm looking into getting a CSA, but with only two people and frequent travel (doing normal times) this seems impractical. I just noticed that there is going to be a CSA fair this weekend and I will try to attend and meet more farmers. maybe I will find something that will work for me as even half share seems a lot.
    edited March 11
  • chris89topherchris89topher Member Posts: 306 Member Member Posts: 306 Member
    I met this interesting fella for the first time today in my box-a-week of veggies:

    30tzf4397jk1.jpg

    Its called Romanesco broccoli and of course I roasted it like I do most veggies. Quite yummy.

    I've seen that in different FB vegetarian groups I'm in but have no idea where to buy it. What does it taste like?
  • ridiculous59ridiculous59 Member Posts: 2,178 Member Member Posts: 2,178 Member
    I met this interesting fella for the first time today in my box-a-week of veggies:

    30tzf4397jk1.jpg

    Its called Romanesco broccoli and of course I roasted it like I do most veggies. Quite yummy.

    I've seen that in different FB vegetarian groups I'm in but have no idea where to buy it. What does it taste like?

    To me it tastes like firm cauliflower. I live in northern British Columbia and have never seen it at the farmers markets around here. My box a week contains local veggies when in season but then purchases are from farther afield during the winter months.
  • ridiculous59ridiculous59 Member Posts: 2,178 Member Member Posts: 2,178 Member
    annk18 wrote: »
    Since finding this thread, I always try to look for something new each time I'm at the farmer's market. The vendors are very helpful and can often describe what something tastes like and how to cook it. I'm looking into getting a CSA, but with only two people and frequent travel (doing normal times) this seems impractical. I just noticed that there is going to be a CSA fair this weekend and I will try to attend and meet more farmers. maybe I will find something that will work for me as even half share seems a lot.

    I was getting a box every week but finding it too much because there's just the two of us and my husband isn't a veggie eater. Now I get one every other week and just fill in an item or two in between, if necessary. Its working well for me right now.
  • snowflake954snowflake954 Member Posts: 6,559 Member Member Posts: 6,559 Member
    It's similar to cauliflower, but it's a cross between that and broccoli. I like it better than cauliflower and it's firmer, doesn't get mushy.
  • o0Firekeeper0oo0Firekeeper0o Member Posts: 295 Member Member Posts: 295 Member
    All this talk makes me miss broccoli and cauliflower. My husband doesn’t even want cauliflower in the house (due to a stomach flu memory) and I swore off broccoli because every time I ate it there was a 50/50 chance I’d end up with agonizing stomach pain. I’m half tempted to try broccoli again though. It used to be one of my favorite veggies :(
  • mockchocmockchoc Member Posts: 6,580 Member Member Posts: 6,580 Member
    mtaratoot wrote: »
    Mushroom Barley Vegetable Miso Soup.

    This dish can be modified to suit your needs or desires. It also can make use of what vegetables you happen to have. I have used potatoes, but don't do that anymore. The barley is hearty enough, I save the potatoes for some other use. When I have parsnips, they go good. Carrots are a little sweeter and add color. Be aware: I love mushrooms and garlic. Adjust amounts to suit your needs.

    I am fortunate that I collect wild mushrooms. If I have more than I can eat right away, I prep them and lightly saute and then freeze and vacuum seal. I can pull out a litte bag and add it to anything I want that deep delicious wild mushroom flavor. I usually add some "grocery store mushrooms" to help fill it out. The batch I just made used a mix of white and brown (cremini) mushrooms. Note that white button mushrooms, cremini mushrooms, and portobello mushrooms are all the same species, Agaricus bisporus. I call 'em "Grocery Store Mushrooms." You can also add shiitake, but they will need longer cooking or be cut smaller. If you can afford (or find) porcini.... yum.

    A note on barley. You can use pearled barley; I don't. Perled barley has not just the hull removed, but it's polished to remove some or all of the bran. Hulled (de-hulled) barley is a more whole grain. I also like the flavor. Lately I've been using what's known as semi-hulled barley. It's a variety called Blue Streaker that was bred in the 1970s to be easy for the hull to fall off. Remember the 1970s? Remember the "streaker" craze? This barley does have blue streaks, but the agronomists who bred it had a chuckle with the name.

    Now it's time to cook.

    Assemble some delicious ingredients. In this case:

    Hulled barley
    Lots of mushrooms. I'd say a pound, but I love 'em.
    A big yellow onion
    Three or four celery stalks
    Two or four carrots
    A head of garlic. Yes a head.
    A little sherry (optional)
    Some hot chiles (I used chiles de Arbol this time around; also optional)
    A few freshly-plucked bay leaves from the bush outside (or some from the grocery)
    Good quality salt
    Miso (I use both mellow white and traditional red miso)

    First measure out a half or 2/3 cups or so of barley. Put them in a pot. Add three times as much water as barley. Turn on the heat. When it boils, set it to low, and set the timer to about 30 or 40 minutes. After a few minutes, fill a tea kettle with water and put it on the stove to boil.

    Meanwhile, slice the celery into delicious sized pieces and set aside. Do the same with the carrot. Slice the mushrooms and set them aside. Cut off the hard end of each garlic clove and peel them all. You can either leave them whole (mine are slightly smushed from smacking them to get the outer husk off) or cut them in half or quarters. Set aside.

    Chop the onion into pieces about 1/8 inch. I love cutting onions. If they make you cry, adjust the salt in your recipe. :smile:

    Get a big saute pan out of the cabinet. Put it on the stove, and get it hot. Add some oil. I use olive oil, but you can use sunflower, grapeseed, or avocoado. Your choice. When it shimmers, add a piece of onions. If it sizzles, add the rest of the onion and cook a few minutes until it starts to soften. You can add some salt if you like, or not. It will soften faster if you put the lid on.

    As the onion softens, add the celery and cook another minute. Then add the mushrooms and cook another minute or three. Then add the carrots and cook another minute. At this point, I broke apart the dried chiles and added them.

    jwrknkcnktw4.jpg

    By now the barley should be about done.

    Add the garlic and cook every so briefly. By now these veggies will smell great.

    Add all the vegetables to the barley. Heat up the saute pan and deglaze with some sherry.

    Add boiling water from the kettle to cover the vegetables. Add as much water as you like. The more you add, the more soup you have. The less you add, the heartier the soup will be.

    Bring back to boil, then turn down to low and add the bay leaves. Let this simmer about 40 minutes, more or less.
    2kko8ijfxi2a.jpg


    Meanwhile, put 1-2 Tbsp each of white and red miso into a bowl. Add a little sherry or other liquid and stir to liquify. Set aside.

    When the soup is done cooking, take it off the heat. Ladle some of the liquid into the bowl with the miso, then add the miso back to the main pot and stir. You want to avoid boiling the miso. It's a living product. This does mean that when you reheat the soup you have to be careful not to cook it too hot, or else you may lose some of the healthy properties of miso.

    Stir.

    Ladle a bowl full. Sit down and enjoy. Wait 15 minutes before you get another bowl, because it's pretty filling, and we're watching our calories, right? This soup probably would work well if you added some ginger. It also goes great with a side of kimchi.

    I don't typically update my recipe, and when I log it, the version I use actually did have potatoes. I'm not too worried. It's about 64 calories per 100 grams, and a bowl is 250 to 350 grams. Very filling, and very tasty.

    Do you have this pinned on Pinterest? If you do I'd love to pin it to make some day. Sounds perfect.
  • mtaratootmtaratoot Member, Premium Posts: 6,336 Member Member, Premium Posts: 6,336 Member
    mockchoc wrote: »
    mtaratoot wrote: »
    Mushroom Barley Vegetable Miso Soup.

    This dish can be modified to suit your needs or desires. It also can make use of what vegetables you happen to have. I have used potatoes, but don't do that anymore. The barley is hearty enough, I save the potatoes for some other use. When I have parsnips, they go good. Carrots are a little sweeter and add color. Be aware: I love mushrooms and garlic. Adjust amounts to suit your needs.

    I am fortunate that I collect wild mushrooms. If I have more than I can eat right away, I prep them and lightly saute and then freeze and vacuum seal. I can pull out a litte bag and add it to anything I want that deep delicious wild mushroom flavor. I usually add some "grocery store mushrooms" to help fill it out. The batch I just made used a mix of white and brown (cremini) mushrooms. Note that white button mushrooms, cremini mushrooms, and portobello mushrooms are all the same species, Agaricus bisporus. I call 'em "Grocery Store Mushrooms." You can also add shiitake, but they will need longer cooking or be cut smaller. If you can afford (or find) porcini.... yum.


    A note on barley. You can use pearled barley; I don't. Perled barley has not just the hull removed, but it's polished to remove some or all of the bran. Hulled (de-hulled) barley is a more whole grain. I also like the flavor. Lately I've been using what's known as semi-hulled barley. It's a variety called Blue Streaker that was bred in the 1970s to be easy for the hull to fall off. Remember the 1970s? Remember the "streaker" craze? This barley does have blue streaks, but the agronomists who bred it had a chuckle with the name.

    Now it's time to cook.

    Assemble some delicious ingredients. In this case:

    Hulled barley
    Lots of mushrooms. I'd say a pound, but I love 'em.
    A big yellow onion
    Three or four celery stalks
    Two or four carrots
    A head of garlic. Yes a head.
    A little sherry (optional)
    Some hot chiles (I used chiles de Arbol this time around; also optional)
    A few freshly-plucked bay leaves from the bush outside (or some from the grocery)
    Good quality salt
    Miso (I use both mellow white and traditional red miso)

    First measure out a half or 2/3 cups or so of barley. Put them in a pot. Add three times as much water as barley. Turn on the heat. When it boils, set it to low, and set the timer to about 30 or 40 minutes. After a few minutes, fill a tea kettle with water and put it on the stove to boil.

    Meanwhile, slice the celery into delicious sized pieces and set aside. Do the same with the carrot. Slice the mushrooms and set them aside. Cut off the hard end of each garlic clove and peel them all. You can either leave them whole (mine are slightly smushed from smacking them to get the outer husk off) or cut them in half or quarters. Set aside.

    Chop the onion into pieces about 1/8 inch. I love cutting onions. If they make you cry, adjust the salt in your recipe. :smile:

    Get a big saute pan out of the cabinet. Put it on the stove, and get it hot. Add some oil. I use olive oil, but you can use sunflower, grapeseed, or avocoado. Your choice. When it shimmers, add a piece of onions. If it sizzles, add the rest of the onion and cook a few minutes until it starts to soften. You can add some salt if you like, or not. It will soften faster if you put the lid on.

    As the onion softens, add the celery and cook another minute. Then add the mushrooms and cook another minute or three. Then add the carrots and cook another minute. At this point, I broke apart the dried chiles and added them.

    jwrknkcnktw4.jpg

    By now the barley should be about done.

    Add the garlic and cook every so briefly. By now these veggies will smell great.

    Add all the vegetables to the barley. Heat up the saute pan and deglaze with some sherry.

    Add boiling water from the kettle to cover the vegetables. Add as much water as you like. The more you add, the more soup you have. The less you add, the heartier the soup will be.

    Bring back to boil, then turn down to low and add the bay leaves. Let this simmer about 40 minutes, more or less.
    2kko8ijfxi2a.jpg


    Meanwhile, put 1-2 Tbsp each of white and red miso into a bowl. Add a little sherry or other liquid and stir to liquify. Set aside.

    When the soup is done cooking, take it off the heat. Ladle some of the liquid into the bowl with the miso, then add the miso back to the main pot and stir. You want to avoid boiling the miso. It's a living product. This does mean that when you reheat the soup you have to be careful not to cook it too hot, or else you may lose some of the healthy properties of miso.

    Stir.

    Ladle a bowl full. Sit down and enjoy. Wait 15 minutes before you get another bowl, because it's pretty filling, and we're watching our calories, right? This soup probably would work well if you added some ginger. It also goes great with a side of kimchi.

    I don't typically update my recipe, and when I log it, the version I use actually did have potatoes. I'm not too worried. It's about 64 calories per 100 grams, and a bowl is 250 to 350 grams. Very filling, and very tasty.

    Do you have this pinned on Pinterest? If you do I'd love to pin it to make some day. Sounds perfect.

    I am not on pintrest. It's also really just a process. The recipe changes every time I make it. Basically just cook some barley, then while it cooks, cut and saute the veggies you want to use, then add them to the barley and add some water and simmer slowly for a while.

    I bought more Agaricaus bisporus at the grocery last time I was there, so I'll probably be making a batch this weekend. It's going to be really onion heavy because I have a whole lot of onions. I'll also pull out another little bag of frozen chanterelles because...mmmmm. I might add some garbanzos just to change it up and because I plan to soak some tonight and cook them tomorrow or the next day. If I don't roast the second half of the bunch of asparagus I got the other day on a whim, maybe I'll add them to the soup. I bet that would be fanTASTIC.

    I've been doing a lot of black bean soup lately, too. So so delicious.
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