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Coronavirus prep

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Replies

  • paperpudding
    paperpudding Posts: 7,174 Member
    Dnarules wrote: »
    yes, interesting difference.

    Even back in March/April when flu vaccines were at their peak here - ie just before southern hemisphere winter - one week gap was the thing.

    was 2 week gap initially but then reduced to 1.

    Sometimes inconvenient for people but that's what it is.

    (shingles vaccine may be different in US recomendations because it is a live vaccine - the others are not)

    Our shingles vaccine (US) is inactivated.



    In that case I can't think of any reason why other vaccines are considered OK with covid vaccine but shingles vaccine is not.

    I'm not sure...it might not be a medical reason, but more of a comfort issue.

    Very few people I know have ever had a noticeable reaction to a flu vaccine. But almost everyone I know has had some sort of reaction (mild to severe) from the COVID and shingles vaccines.

    That's just a personal observation.


    That hasn't been my observation - and I give a lot of vaccines in my job.

    Hasn't been any more local reactions in covid or shingles vs flu vaccines
  • paperpudding
    paperpudding Posts: 7,174 Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    yes, interesting difference.

    Even back in March/April when flu vaccines were at their peak here - ie just before southern hemisphere winter - one week gap was the thing.

    was 2 week gap initially but then reduced to 1.

    Sometimes inconvenient for people but that's what it is.

    (shingles vaccine may be different in US recomendations because it is a live vaccine - the others are not)

    Have they said why the gap? I've been trying to decide which to get first in case I want a gap between them (I just became eligible based on the 6 months for the booster).


    Just being cautious I think because it is a new vaccine.

    Doesn't matter what order you do whatever you are due for though eg whether you have flu or whatever or covid first.
  • Theoldguy1
    Theoldguy1 Posts: 2,171 Member
    Dnarules wrote: »
    yes, interesting difference.

    Even back in March/April when flu vaccines were at their peak here - ie just before southern hemisphere winter - one week gap was the thing.

    was 2 week gap initially but then reduced to 1.

    Sometimes inconvenient for people but that's what it is.

    (shingles vaccine may be different in US recomendations because it is a live vaccine - the others are not)

    Our shingles vaccine (US) is inactivated.



    In that case I can't think of any reason why other vaccines are considered OK with covid vaccine but shingles vaccine is not.

    I'm not sure...it might not be a medical reason, but more of a comfort issue.

    Very few people I know have ever had a noticeable reaction to a flu vaccine. But almost everyone I know has had some sort of reaction (mild to severe) from the COVID and shingles vaccines.

    That's just a personal observation.


    That hasn't been my observation - and I give a lot of vaccines in my job.

    Hasn't been any more local reactions in covid or shingles vs flu vaccines

    Do you follow your patients home to observe them? I've never had any immediate reaction to a vaccine while in the presence of the person administering the shock, nor have any family or friends ever told me of an immediate reaction, but I and most of those I know have had reactions (extreme soreness in the injection arm, fatigue/sleepiness/lassitude, headaches) to covid and shingles vaccines, whereas I have only heard two or three people have reactions beyond mild injection site soreness to flu shots.

    Personally no issues with covid, shingles or flu injections.
  • PapillonNoire
    PapillonNoire Posts: 74 Member
    This was the first year I've ever had a reaction to the flu shot; I was exhausted and achy for about 24 hours after.

    Interestingly, I had no reaction at all to either of my Pfizer doses.
  • paperpudding
    paperpudding Posts: 7,174 Member
    Dnarules wrote: »
    yes, interesting difference.

    Even back in March/April when flu vaccines were at their peak here - ie just before southern hemisphere winter - one week gap was the thing.

    was 2 week gap initially but then reduced to 1.

    Sometimes inconvenient for people but that's what it is.

    (shingles vaccine may be different in US recomendations because it is a live vaccine - the others are not)

    Our shingles vaccine (US) is inactivated.



    In that case I can't think of any reason why other vaccines are considered OK with covid vaccine but shingles vaccine is not.

    I'm not sure...it might not be a medical reason, but more of a comfort issue.

    Very few people I know have ever had a noticeable reaction to a flu vaccine. But almost everyone I know has had some sort of reaction (mild to severe) from the COVID and shingles vaccines.

    That's just a personal observation.


    That hasn't been my observation - and I give a lot of vaccines in my job.

    Hasn't been any more local reactions in covid or shingles vs flu vaccines

    Hmmm...again, just my personal observations...

    My workplace provides flu vaccines every year, and most employees take them.

    Over the years, I've heard one or two of my co-workers say they were a little tired or sore the next day.

    All of my co-workers have now been vaccinated for COVID (by mandate). Well over half talked about moderate to severe reactions....fevers, headaches, exhaustion, etc. Very few people said they had little to no reaction.

    In my little world, it's a very stark difference between the two vaccines.


    That's interesting.

    Many people I know have had no reaction to the covid vac or minor reactions only - not everyone, and I haven't kept statistics to say what percentage - but many people.

    Not heard of anyone having issues with shingles vaccine here.

    And the starting point of all this wasn't whether covid vac causes reactions but why other vaccines, in US, can be given co currently with covid vac but shingles cannot.
  • oocdc2
    oocdc2 Posts: 1,352 Member
    edited October 19
    Dnarules wrote: »
    yes, interesting difference.

    Even back in March/April when flu vaccines were at their peak here - ie just before southern hemisphere winter - one week gap was the thing.

    was 2 week gap initially but then reduced to 1.

    Sometimes inconvenient for people but that's what it is.

    (shingles vaccine may be different in US recomendations because it is a live vaccine - the others are not)

    Our shingles vaccine (US) is inactivated.



    In that case I can't think of any reason why other vaccines are considered OK with covid vaccine but shingles vaccine is not.

    I'm not sure...it might not be a medical reason, but more of a comfort issue.

    Very few people I know have ever had a noticeable reaction to a flu vaccine. But almost everyone I know has had some sort of reaction (mild to severe) from the COVID and shingles vaccines.

    That's just a personal observation.


    That hasn't been my observation - and I give a lot of vaccines in my job.

    Hasn't been any more local reactions in covid or shingles vs flu vaccines

    Hmmm...again, just my personal observations...

    My workplace provides flu vaccines every year, and most employees take them.

    Over the years, I've heard one or two of my co-workers say they were a little tired or sore the next day.

    All of my co-workers have now been vaccinated for COVID (by mandate). Well over half talked about moderate to severe reactions....fevers, headaches, exhaustion, etc. Very few people said they had little to no reaction.

    In my little world, it's a very stark difference between the two vaccines.

    It also may have to do with exposure--COVID-19 is new to all of us, relatively speaking. We've been exposed to influenza our whole lives in some form or another, so the flu vaccinations won't necessarily have the impact. The J&J vaccine, on the other hand, knocked me on my *kitten* the next day, and I welcomed it, frankly--I felt like I knew it was working.

    I also expect to have COVID knock me on my *kitten* if I ever catch it, too, because no one ever said the vaccine prevented symptoms; it just gives you a better chance of survival. (Edit: No certified expert, anyway...)
  • 33gail33
    33gail33 Posts: 1,032 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Dnarules wrote: »
    yes, interesting difference.

    Even back in March/April when flu vaccines were at their peak here - ie just before southern hemisphere winter - one week gap was the thing.

    was 2 week gap initially but then reduced to 1.

    Sometimes inconvenient for people but that's what it is.

    (shingles vaccine may be different in US recomendations because it is a live vaccine - the others are not)

    Our shingles vaccine (US) is inactivated.



    In that case I can't think of any reason why other vaccines are considered OK with covid vaccine but shingles vaccine is not.

    I'm not sure...it might not be a medical reason, but more of a comfort issue.

    Very few people I know have ever had a noticeable reaction to a flu vaccine. But almost everyone I know has had some sort of reaction (mild to severe) from the COVID and shingles vaccines.

    That's just a personal observation.


    That hasn't been my observation - and I give a lot of vaccines in my job.

    Hasn't been any more local reactions in covid or shingles vs flu vaccines

    Hmmm...again, just my personal observations...

    My workplace provides flu vaccines every year, and most employees take them.

    Over the years, I've heard one or two of my co-workers say they were a little tired or sore the next day.

    All of my co-workers have now been vaccinated for COVID (by mandate). Well over half talked about moderate to severe reactions....fevers, headaches, exhaustion, etc. Very few people said they had little to no reaction.

    In my little world, it's a very stark difference between the two vaccines.


    That's interesting.

    Many people I know have had no reaction to the covid vac or minor reactions only - not everyone, and I haven't kept statistics to say what percentage - but many people.

    Not heard of anyone having issues with shingles vaccine here.

    And the starting point of all this wasn't whether covid vac causes reactions but why other vaccines, in US, can be given co currently with covid vac but shingles cannot.

    Are you certain that the shingles vax where you are is the same as in countries others are reporting from?

    I know nothing about vaccines, but understand that sometimes the recommended or available ones can differ by nation.

    Background reason for asking: The "old" shingles vax in the US - a zoster live vaccine (ZVL, Zostavax) had no significant reputation for unusual side effects, among those I know. The newer one, a recombinant zoster vaccine (RZV, Shingrix) has quite a reputation among people I know for side effects - not super severe, but the pretty-unpleasant soreness, swelling, fever, etc. - perhaps especially after the second shot.

    Yeah I am scared to get the shingles vaccine (although I do want it) because I have heard the side effects are nasty - worse than the Covid vaccine. I guess I thought it was just common knowledge that it gives a bad reaction.
    Both my husband and I had our first ever flu shot in the fall, and both Covid shots. Covid shots were definitely worse reactions (although not super severe for either of us.)
  • 33gail33
    33gail33 Posts: 1,032 Member
    Dnarules wrote: »
    yes, interesting difference.

    Even back in March/April when flu vaccines were at their peak here - ie just before southern hemisphere winter - one week gap was the thing.

    was 2 week gap initially but then reduced to 1.

    Sometimes inconvenient for people but that's what it is.

    (shingles vaccine may be different in US recomendations because it is a live vaccine - the others are not)

    Our shingles vaccine (US) is inactivated.



    In that case I can't think of any reason why other vaccines are considered OK with covid vaccine but shingles vaccine is not.

    I'm not sure...it might not be a medical reason, but more of a comfort issue.

    Very few people I know have ever had a noticeable reaction to a flu vaccine. But almost everyone I know has had some sort of reaction (mild to severe) from the COVID and shingles vaccines.

    That's just a personal observation.


    That hasn't been my observation - and I give a lot of vaccines in my job.

    Hasn't been any more local reactions in covid or shingles vs flu vaccines

    Do you follow your patients home to observe them? I've never had any immediate reaction to a vaccine while in the presence of the person administering the shock, nor have any family or friends ever told me of an immediate reaction, but I and most of those I know have had reactions (extreme soreness in the injection arm, fatigue/sleepiness/lassitude, headaches) to covid and shingles vaccines, whereas I have only heard two or three people have reactions beyond mild injection site soreness to flu shots.


    No of course I dont. Seems a weird rhetorical question. :*

    But I do work in a centre with regular patients so we do see people afterward and hear of their experience after ward.
    And I do live in a town where many people know of my work position - which leads to conversations about vaccine issues.

    Also, obviously Covid is 2 vaccines and flu is annually - so we do talk to people about their previous experience.

    I dont claim any universal knowledge about this, - but, as I said, in my observation, there have not been more local reactions to Covid, shingles or flu vaccines.

    Maybe 'most of those you know' is a wider experience and more valid observation, I dont know.

    Can only say what my observation is and where it comes from.




    Husband and I both had headache/fatigue after our first Covid shot, husband had fever/chills after his second Covid shot, my DIL was SICK in bed for several days after her second shot, and my other DIL got shingles. Only the shingles was ever mentioned to a health care provider. Unless it is severe I doubt anyone would mention it to their doctor/nurse.
  • 33gail33
    33gail33 Posts: 1,032 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    33gail33 wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Dnarules wrote: »
    yes, interesting difference.

    Even back in March/April when flu vaccines were at their peak here - ie just before southern hemisphere winter - one week gap was the thing.

    was 2 week gap initially but then reduced to 1.

    Sometimes inconvenient for people but that's what it is.

    (shingles vaccine may be different in US recomendations because it is a live vaccine - the others are not)

    Our shingles vaccine (US) is inactivated.



    In that case I can't think of any reason why other vaccines are considered OK with covid vaccine but shingles vaccine is not.

    I'm not sure...it might not be a medical reason, but more of a comfort issue.

    Very few people I know have ever had a noticeable reaction to a flu vaccine. But almost everyone I know has had some sort of reaction (mild to severe) from the COVID and shingles vaccines.

    That's just a personal observation.


    That hasn't been my observation - and I give a lot of vaccines in my job.

    Hasn't been any more local reactions in covid or shingles vs flu vaccines

    Hmmm...again, just my personal observations...

    My workplace provides flu vaccines every year, and most employees take them.

    Over the years, I've heard one or two of my co-workers say they were a little tired or sore the next day.

    All of my co-workers have now been vaccinated for COVID (by mandate). Well over half talked about moderate to severe reactions....fevers, headaches, exhaustion, etc. Very few people said they had little to no reaction.

    In my little world, it's a very stark difference between the two vaccines.


    That's interesting.

    Many people I know have had no reaction to the covid vac or minor reactions only - not everyone, and I haven't kept statistics to say what percentage - but many people.

    Not heard of anyone having issues with shingles vaccine here.

    And the starting point of all this wasn't whether covid vac causes reactions but why other vaccines, in US, can be given co currently with covid vac but shingles cannot.

    Are you certain that the shingles vax where you are is the same as in countries others are reporting from?

    I know nothing about vaccines, but understand that sometimes the recommended or available ones can differ by nation.

    Background reason for asking: The "old" shingles vax in the US - a zoster live vaccine (ZVL, Zostavax) had no significant reputation for unusual side effects, among those I know. The newer one, a recombinant zoster vaccine (RZV, Shingrix) has quite a reputation among people I know for side effects - not super severe, but the pretty-unpleasant soreness, swelling, fever, etc. - perhaps especially after the second shot.

    Yeah I am scared to get the shingles vaccine (although I do want it) because I have heard the side effects are nasty - worse than the Covid vaccine. I guess I thought it was just common knowledge that it gives a bad reaction.
    Both my husband and I had our first ever flu shot in the fall, and both Covid shots. Covid shots were definitely worse reactions (although not super severe for either of us.)

    Shingles can be really, really terrible. Really terrible. Long lasting. Major pain: Deep nerve pain, which is some weird and unpleasant stuff. Itching. Fatigue.

    My mother, who was pretty unstoppable, was laid low. Her cousin, a tough old farm woman, was laid low over and over by recurrent shingles. It can cause blindness, in rare cases. One of my friends got it immediately after laparoscopic gallbladder surgery, in the zone of the incisions. It was excruciating, the nerve pain amplifying and prolonging what would've been relatively minor surgical recovery pain.

    I've had shingles, fortunately minor. You don't want shingles. It is much worse than the common vaccine side effects.

    Yes I for sure am going to get it - I am just waiting because I have other issues going on right now, and I know it is two shots and I'm not sure what is happening here with Covid boosters, if we are getting those or not.