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What are your unpopular opinions about health / fitness?

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Replies

  • vegmebuff
    vegmebuff Posts: 31,389 Member
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    I think WLS is plain wrong. Operating on a healthy stomach and forcing people to starve themselves instead of improving eating habits, attitudes and environment. In the future it's going to be viewed the same way lobotomy is viewed today: Torture, barbaric, cruel.

    Daily activity is all over more important than exercise. Incorporating movement into our daily life makes it more natural and easy and more likely to stick. Exhausting oneself to burn calories is futile. Enjoying sports is something completely different.

    Snacking is contributing to the obesity epidemic. I am all for reintroducing meals. If IF can do that, I may have to settle for that solution.

    This, this and this too for me. Also, what you eat matters - there's good foods and bad foods.

    This. There are junk foods.

    I don't think you're allowed to say that on MFP. You're allowed to eat cocaine laced with gasoline as long as you measure it to the gram on a food scale and fit the calories into your day.

    ^^^omg...this is SO true! lmao when I read this
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    edited August 2017
    JerSchmare wrote: »
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    Eh, I think what you eat matters (I mean overall diet, of course), and I never thought that particular opinion of mine was an unpopular one. Seems to me to be shared by most.

    The problem with you statement is that it's not specific enough. It depends on your goals.

    The statement is not true, per se. If my goal is to lose weight, I can do that eating McDonalds everyday.

    So, for weight loss, what you eat does not matter. How much of it you eat matters a lot.

    I would say what you eat matters for some purpose, namely health, perhaps how you feel and satiety. Agreed not for weight loss, if you control calories in some other way and don't eat a diet that makes you feel bad, which is why I did not say "what you eat matters for weight loss."

    Whether you care about those things does not mean they don't matter. Just that they aren't concerns/goals of yours. I totally agree that plenty of people don't care to concern themselves with nutrition.

    Similarly, I would say that eating calories over one's TDEE matters (or makes a difference, if you prefer). Some people may not care if they gain weight, or gain a little weight in the short term, or may want to or need to gain weight -- that's their goal. Fact remains that eating calories over TDEE makes a difference (matters). Same for "what you eat."

    I'd also say that at the calories the average person eats in the US and with the variety of foods available and common supplementation, most people are unlikely to have nutrient deficiencies. I just don't think that's the end-all of why nutrition matters.
  • cmriverside
    cmriverside Posts: 32,803 Member
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    Eh, I think what you eat matters (I mean overall diet, of course), and I never thought that particular opinion of mine was an unpopular one. Seems to me to be shared by most.

    Oh no you din't.


    Why did you decide to revisit this little gem? Like it is in the Top Ten of unpopular genpop opinion, but...well, I guess it IS page 116. :lol:
  • GottaBurnEmAll
    GottaBurnEmAll Posts: 7,722 Member
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    Eh, I think what you eat matters (I mean overall diet, of course), and I never thought that particular opinion of mine was an unpopular one. Seems to me to be shared by most.

    I bloody love you.
  • Packerjohn
    Packerjohn Posts: 4,855 Member
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    JerSchmare wrote: »
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    Eh, I think what you eat matters (I mean overall diet, of course), and I never thought that particular opinion of mine was an unpopular one. Seems to me to be shared by most.

    The problem with you statement is that it's not specific enough. It depends on your goals.

    The statement is not true, per se. If my goal is to lose weight, I can do that eating McDonalds everyday.

    So, for weight loss, what you eat does not matter. How much of it you eat matters a lot.

    I would say what you eat matters for some purpose, namely health, perhaps how you feel and satiety. Agreed not for weight loss, if you control calories in some other way and don't eat a diet that makes you feel bad, which is why I did not say "what you eat matters for weight loss."

    Whether you care about those things does not mean they don't matter. Just that they aren't concerns/goals of yours. I totally agree that plenty of people don't care to concern themselves with nutrition.

    Similarly, I would say that eating calories over one's TDEE matters (or makes a difference, if you prefer). Some people may not care if they gain weight, or gain a little weight in the short term, or may want to or need to gain weight -- that's their goal. Fact remains that eating calories over TDEE makes a difference (matters). Same for "what you eat."

    I'd also say that at the calories the average person eats in the US and with the variety of foods available and common supplementation, most people are unlikely to have nutrient deficiencies. I just don't think that's the end-all of why nutrition matters.

    Given the lack of fruits and vegetables in the average US diet, not sure if the highlighted is a true statement.

    Only about one in every 10 Americans eats enough fruits and vegetables, a new government report shows.
    Just 13 percent of U.S. residents consume one and a half to two cups of fruit every day as recommended by federal dietary guidelines, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found. The news on the vegetable front was even worse. Less than 9 percent of Americans eat two to three cups of vegetables every day as recommended, the report showed.
    [/i]

    http://health.usnews.com/health-news/articles/2015/07/09/only-1-in-10-americans-eats-enough-fruits-and-veggies-cdc
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    edited August 2017
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    Eh, I think what you eat matters (I mean overall diet, of course), and I never thought that particular opinion of mine was an unpopular one. Seems to me to be shared by most.

    Oh no you din't.


    Why did you decide to revisit this little gem? Like it is in the Top Ten of unpopular genpop opinion, but...well, I guess it IS page 116. :lol:

    Because of vegmebuff's post right before mine (at the bottom of page 115) -- did you notice it?
  • born_of_fire74
    born_of_fire74 Posts: 776 Member
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    JerSchmare wrote: »
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    Eh, I think what you eat matters (I mean overall diet, of course), and I never thought that particular opinion of mine was an unpopular one. Seems to me to be shared by most.

    The problem with you statement is that it's not specific enough. It depends on your goals.

    The statement is not true, per se. If my goal is to lose weight, I can do that eating McDonalds everyday.

    So, for weight loss, what you eat does not matter. How much of it you eat matters a lot.

    I would say what you eat matters for some purpose, namely health, perhaps how you feel and satiety. Agreed not for weight loss, if you control calories in some other way and don't eat a diet that makes you feel bad, which is why I did not say "what you eat matters for weight loss."

    Whether you care about those things does not mean they don't matter. Just that they aren't concerns/goals of yours. I totally agree that plenty of people don't care to concern themselves with nutrition.

    Similarly, I would say that eating calories over one's TDEE matters (or makes a difference, if you prefer). Some people may not care if they gain weight, or gain a little weight in the short term, or may want to or need to gain weight -- that's their goal. Fact remains that eating calories over TDEE makes a difference (matters). Same for "what you eat."

    I'd also say that at the calories the average person eats in the US and with the variety of foods available and common supplementation, most people are unlikely to have nutrient deficiencies. I just don't think that's the end-all of why nutrition matters.

    Given the lack of fruits and vegetables in the average US diet, not sure if the highlighted is a true statement.

    Only about one in every 10 Americans eats enough fruits and vegetables, a new government report shows.
    Just 13 percent of U.S. residents consume one and a half to two cups of fruit every day as recommended by federal dietary guidelines, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found. The news on the vegetable front was even worse. Less than 9 percent of Americans eat two to three cups of vegetables every day as recommended, the report showed.
    [/i]

    http://health.usnews.com/health-news/articles/2015/07/09/only-1-in-10-americans-eats-enough-fruits-and-veggies-cdc

    It is true, regardless of their fruit and vegetable intake. The sheer amount of calories many people consume makes sure they're okay on nutrients. Nutrient poor foods are not devoid of nutrients. I did this test a while back where I used cronometer to track one deliberately "junky" day. I was expecting it to look horrible, but it didn't look half as bad as I thought it would.

    Menu:
    Breakfast: Sandwich
    Lunch: instant noodles with canned wieners and chickpeas
    Dinner: Mcdonald's cheeseburger and fries
    Snacks: peanut butter and jam, milk (many people drink milk), and some fruits (yes, I cheated a little because going without vegetables was bad enough I couldn't also go without fruits and very few people go completely without any nutrient dense foods)

    Total calories: 2113

    r8p8huoz3qpi.png

    Where is that screenshot with all your micronutrients from?

  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    Looks like Cronometer, which is by far the best site for tracking micros, but is only good if you mostly eat foods that can be tracked from sources like USDA (largely whole foods).

    I do it off and on just to make sure my normal diet is fine, especially if I change things up or do lower cals for a while. It's more fun to track there, IMO, but a pain if you use lots of brand name things.
  • amusedmonkey
    amusedmonkey Posts: 10,331 Member
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    JerSchmare wrote: »
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    Eh, I think what you eat matters (I mean overall diet, of course), and I never thought that particular opinion of mine was an unpopular one. Seems to me to be shared by most.

    The problem with you statement is that it's not specific enough. It depends on your goals.

    The statement is not true, per se. If my goal is to lose weight, I can do that eating McDonalds everyday.

    So, for weight loss, what you eat does not matter. How much of it you eat matters a lot.

    I would say what you eat matters for some purpose, namely health, perhaps how you feel and satiety. Agreed not for weight loss, if you control calories in some other way and don't eat a diet that makes you feel bad, which is why I did not say "what you eat matters for weight loss."

    Whether you care about those things does not mean they don't matter. Just that they aren't concerns/goals of yours. I totally agree that plenty of people don't care to concern themselves with nutrition.

    Similarly, I would say that eating calories over one's TDEE matters (or makes a difference, if you prefer). Some people may not care if they gain weight, or gain a little weight in the short term, or may want to or need to gain weight -- that's their goal. Fact remains that eating calories over TDEE makes a difference (matters). Same for "what you eat."

    I'd also say that at the calories the average person eats in the US and with the variety of foods available and common supplementation, most people are unlikely to have nutrient deficiencies. I just don't think that's the end-all of why nutrition matters.

    Given the lack of fruits and vegetables in the average US diet, not sure if the highlighted is a true statement.

    Only about one in every 10 Americans eats enough fruits and vegetables, a new government report shows.
    Just 13 percent of U.S. residents consume one and a half to two cups of fruit every day as recommended by federal dietary guidelines, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found. The news on the vegetable front was even worse. Less than 9 percent of Americans eat two to three cups of vegetables every day as recommended, the report showed.
    [/i]

    http://health.usnews.com/health-news/articles/2015/07/09/only-1-in-10-americans-eats-enough-fruits-and-veggies-cdc

    It is true, regardless of their fruit and vegetable intake. The sheer amount of calories many people consume makes sure they're okay on nutrients. Nutrient poor foods are not devoid of nutrients. I did this test a while back where I used cronometer to track one deliberately "junky" day. I was expecting it to look horrible, but it didn't look half as bad as I thought it would.

    Menu:
    Breakfast: Sandwich
    Lunch: instant noodles with canned wieners and chickpeas
    Dinner: Mcdonald's cheeseburger and fries
    Snacks: peanut butter and jam, milk (many people drink milk), and some fruits (yes, I cheated a little because going without vegetables was bad enough I couldn't also go without fruits and very few people go completely without any nutrient dense foods)

    Total calories: 2113

    r8p8huoz3qpi.png

    Where is that screenshot with all your micronutrients from?

    Cronometer. If you eat more packaged foods than you would be bothered to add manually it can be tedious. For chain restaurants and whole foods it's great, except it doesn't have a multi-add like MFP which I use a lot for foods I eat often.
  • OliveGirl128
    OliveGirl128 Posts: 801 Member
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    JerSchmare wrote: »
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    Eh, I think what you eat matters (I mean overall diet, of course), and I never thought that particular opinion of mine was an unpopular one. Seems to me to be shared by most.

    The problem with you statement is that it's not specific enough. It depends on your goals.

    The statement is not true, per se. If my goal is to lose weight, I can do that eating McDonalds everyday.

    So, for weight loss, what you eat does not matter. How much of it you eat matters a lot.

    I would say what you eat matters for some purpose, namely health, perhaps how you feel and satiety. Agreed not for weight loss, if you control calories in some other way and don't eat a diet that makes you feel bad, which is why I did not say "what you eat matters for weight loss."

    Whether you care about those things does not mean they don't matter. Just that they aren't concerns/goals of yours. I totally agree that plenty of people don't care to concern themselves with nutrition.

    Similarly, I would say that eating calories over one's TDEE matters (or makes a difference, if you prefer). Some people may not care if they gain weight, or gain a little weight in the short term, or may want to or need to gain weight -- that's their goal. Fact remains that eating calories over TDEE makes a difference (matters). Same for "what you eat."

    I'd also say that at the calories the average person eats in the US and with the variety of foods available and common supplementation, most people are unlikely to have nutrient deficiencies. I just don't think that's the end-all of why nutrition matters.

    Given the lack of fruits and vegetables in the average US diet, not sure if the highlighted is a true statement.

    Only about one in every 10 Americans eats enough fruits and vegetables, a new government report shows.
    Just 13 percent of U.S. residents consume one and a half to two cups of fruit every day as recommended by federal dietary guidelines, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found. The news on the vegetable front was even worse. Less than 9 percent of Americans eat two to three cups of vegetables every day as recommended, the report showed.
    [/i]

    http://health.usnews.com/health-news/articles/2015/07/09/only-1-in-10-americans-eats-enough-fruits-and-veggies-cdc

    It is true, regardless of their fruit and vegetable intake. The sheer amount of calories many people consume makes sure they're okay on nutrients. Nutrient poor foods are not devoid of nutrients. I did this test a while back where I used cronometer to track one deliberately "junky" day. I was expecting it to look horrible, but it didn't look half as bad as I thought it would.

    Menu:
    Breakfast: Sandwich
    Lunch: instant noodles with canned wieners and chickpeas
    Dinner: Mcdonald's cheeseburger and fries
    Snacks: peanut butter and jam, milk (many people drink milk), and some fruits (yes, I cheated a little because going without vegetables was bad enough I couldn't also go without fruits and very few people go completely without any nutrient dense foods)

    Total calories: 2113

    r8p8huoz3qpi.png

    Where is that screenshot with all your micronutrients from?

    Cronometer. If you eat more packaged foods than you would be bothered to add manually it can be tedious. For chain restaurants and whole foods it's great, except it doesn't have a multi-add like MFP which I use a lot for foods I eat often.

    Yeah, cronometer is awesome for giving very detailed breakdowns, but it's also very tedious to use for any length of time.
  • born_of_fire74
    born_of_fire74 Posts: 776 Member
    Thanks!
This discussion has been closed.