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Body Positive Movement - For or against?

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  • Theoldguy1Theoldguy1 Posts: 390Member Member Posts: 390Member Member
    LyndaBSS wrote: »
    How do you feel about the body positive movement? I haven't given it much thought but recently stumbled onto a few forums on a bodybuilding website where the overall theme was extremely against this movement. One commenter went as far as to say people for the movement are looking to destroy our country (USA) by promoting unhealthy eating habits and laziness.

    What does this movement mean to you? Do you agree or disagree with it?

    I was 148 lbs at 5'6", went to the gym for a 4:30 a.m. workout Monday thru Friday. My body was strong.

    I put on 60 pounds in three months due to idiopathic edema. Over ten years later and I'm still working at losing that weight.

    Should I hate my body for it? No.
    Do strangers judge me? Probably.
    Do I care? No.

    We have no way of knowing what someone else is going through. Why should we assume they're obese because they sit on the couch eating pizza and drinking beer all day?

    Personally, I accept people at face value. It's not my place to judge.

    All true, but obesity is rarely the result of a medical issue, it is a result of excess calories

    https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/obesity/symptoms-causes/syc-20375742
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Posts: 3,120Member Member Posts: 3,120Member Member
    I'm all for body positively, nobody should be ridiculed or made to feel ugly, I think it does far more harm than good. How many threads have been made by someone wanting to exercise but being ashamed to because of people judging their weight?
    aokoye wrote: »
    This seems contradictory but maybe I'm misunderstanding you. First you say that you're pro body positivity, then that it does more harm than good, then mention (or at least imply) that there have been a number of threads about people being ashamed to workout because they fear that people will judge their weight.

    I believe the poster is saying that he/she is all for body positivity, because nobody should be ridiculed or made to feel ugly. Doing that (ridicule, etc.) does more harm than good.
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Posts: 3,120Member Member Posts: 3,120Member Member
    aokoye wrote: »
    Never mind that the body positive movement isn't just about fat acceptance. Think it does is taking a really myopic view of it.

    Absolutely this.
  • glovepuppetglovepuppet Posts: 1,743Member Member Posts: 1,743Member Member
    aokoye wrote: »
    I'm all for body positively, nobody should be ridiculed or made to feel ugly, I think it does far more harm than good. How many threads have been made by someone wanting to exercise but being ashamed to because of people judging their weight?

    This seems contradictory but maybe I'm misunderstanding you. First you say that you're pro body positivity, then that it does more harm than good, then mention (or at least imply) that there have been a number of threads about people being ashamed to workout because they fear that people will judge their weight.

    Making people feel ugly does more harm than good.
  • LyndaBSSLyndaBSS Posts: 4,796Member, Premium Member Posts: 4,796Member, Premium Member
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    LyndaBSS wrote: »
    How do you feel about the body positive movement? I haven't given it much thought but recently stumbled onto a few forums on a bodybuilding website where the overall theme was extremely against this movement. One commenter went as far as to say people for the movement are looking to destroy our country (USA) by promoting unhealthy eating habits and laziness.

    What does this movement mean to you? Do you agree or disagree with it?

    I was 148 lbs at 5'6", went to the gym for a 4:30 a.m. workout Monday thru Friday. My body was strong.

    I put on 60 pounds in three months due to idiopathic edema. Over ten years later and I'm still working at losing that weight.

    Should I hate my body for it? No.
    Do strangers judge me? Probably.
    Do I care? No.

    We have no way of knowing what someone else is going through. Why should we assume they're obese because they sit on the couch eating pizza and drinking beer all day?

    Personally, I accept people at face value. It's not my place to judge.

    All true, but obesity is rarely the result of a medical issue, it is a result of excess calories

    https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/obesity/symptoms-causes/syc-20375742

    But are you going to ask an obese person why they are obese? I hope not.

    My point being, if it could happen to me, it could happen to anyone.
  • magnusthenerdmagnusthenerd Posts: 716Member Member Posts: 716Member Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    I'm all for body positively, nobody should be ridiculed or made to feel ugly, I think it does far more harm than good. How many threads have been made by someone wanting to exercise but being ashamed to because of people judging their weight?
    aokoye wrote: »
    This seems contradictory but maybe I'm misunderstanding you. First you say that you're pro body positivity, then that it does more harm than good, then mention (or at least imply) that there have been a number of threads about people being ashamed to workout because they fear that people will judge their weight.

    I believe the poster is saying that he/she is all for body positivity, because nobody should be ridiculed or made to feel ugly. Doing that (ridicule, etc.) does more harm than good.

    Pet peeve of my, ambiguous antecedents to pronouns.
  • aokoyeaokoye Posts: 2,771Member Member Posts: 2,771Member Member
    aokoye wrote: »
    I'm all for body positively, nobody should be ridiculed or made to feel ugly, I think it does far more harm than good. How many threads have been made by someone wanting to exercise but being ashamed to because of people judging their weight?

    This seems contradictory but maybe I'm misunderstanding you. First you say that you're pro body positivity, then that it does more harm than good, then mention (or at least imply) that there have been a number of threads about people being ashamed to workout because they fear that people will judge their weight.

    Making people feel ugly does more harm than good.

    Ah yeah, that wasn't especially clear from what you had written. I do agree with you on that though.
  • glovepuppetglovepuppet Posts: 1,743Member Member Posts: 1,743Member Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    I'm all for body positively, nobody should be ridiculed or made to feel ugly, I think it does far more harm than good. How many threads have been made by someone wanting to exercise but being ashamed to because of people judging their weight?
    aokoye wrote: »
    This seems contradictory but maybe I'm misunderstanding you. First you say that you're pro body positivity, then that it does more harm than good, then mention (or at least imply) that there have been a number of threads about people being ashamed to workout because they fear that people will judge their weight.

    I believe the poster is saying that he/she is all for body positivity, because nobody should be ridiculed or made to feel ugly. Doing that (ridicule, etc.) does more harm than good.

    Pet peeve of my, ambiguous antecedents to pronouns.

    I'm autistic and didn't even speak until I was four. Communication doesn't come naturally. Bite me.
  • magnusthenerdmagnusthenerd Posts: 716Member Member Posts: 716Member Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    I'm all for body positively, nobody should be ridiculed or made to feel ugly, I think it does far more harm than good. How many threads have been made by someone wanting to exercise but being ashamed to because of people judging their weight?
    aokoye wrote: »
    This seems contradictory but maybe I'm misunderstanding you. First you say that you're pro body positivity, then that it does more harm than good, then mention (or at least imply) that there have been a number of threads about people being ashamed to workout because they fear that people will judge their weight.

    I believe the poster is saying that he/she is all for body positivity, because nobody should be ridiculed or made to feel ugly. Doing that (ridicule, etc.) does more harm than good.

    Pet peeve of my, ambiguous antecedents to pronouns.

    I'm autistic and didn't even speak until I was four. Communication doesn't come naturally. Bite me.

    I'm sorry, I wasn't trying to pick on you - it bothers me in general (don't care for ambiguity), and it is a common issue even for neurotypical people.
  • aokoyeaokoye Posts: 2,771Member Member Posts: 2,771Member Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    I'm all for body positively, nobody should be ridiculed or made to feel ugly, I think it does far more harm than good. How many threads have been made by someone wanting to exercise but being ashamed to because of people judging their weight?
    aokoye wrote: »
    This seems contradictory but maybe I'm misunderstanding you. First you say that you're pro body positivity, then that it does more harm than good, then mention (or at least imply) that there have been a number of threads about people being ashamed to workout because they fear that people will judge their weight.

    I believe the poster is saying that he/she is all for body positivity, because nobody should be ridiculed or made to feel ugly. Doing that (ridicule, etc.) does more harm than good.

    Pet peeve of my, ambiguous antecedents to pronouns.

    I'm autistic and didn't even speak until I was four. Communication doesn't come naturally. Bite me.

    Honestly it was an issue of ambiguity that could have been cleared up with a change in punctuation. Like was said above, it's a super common issue. That's especially when dealing with asynchronous communication.

    edit: and no, I'm not getting on anyone for having difficulty with punctuation or making typos - I'm just partially explaining the root of the ambiguity.
    edited August 21
  • aokoyeaokoye Posts: 2,771Member Member Posts: 2,771Member Member
    MikeRobi81 wrote: »
    Fat acceptance shouldn't be a thing. Everyone should try to be as healthy as they can be. People like Tess Holliday has a huge negative impact on the health of her followers. This movement wants Doctors (medical professionals) to stop using the medical term "obesity" and that is just wrong. I'm against fat shaming, no one should be bullied.

    Body positivity is a lot more than just "fat acceptance".
  • PhirrgusPhirrgus Posts: 1,883Member Member Posts: 1,883Member Member
    aokoye wrote: »
    MikeRobi81 wrote: »
    Fat acceptance shouldn't be a thing. Everyone should try to be as healthy as they can be. People like Tess Holliday has a huge negative impact on the health of her followers. This movement wants Doctors (medical professionals) to stop using the medical term "obesity" and that is just wrong. I'm against fat shaming, no one should be bullied.

    Body positivity is a lot more than just "fat acceptance".

    Peoples perceptions of any movement will always swing towards the most vocal, most public proponents of that movement. I know you know that, I just think it's important to point that out for awareness.
  • unicorngemsunicorngems Posts: 56Member Member Posts: 56Member Member
    I think we should love ourselves no matter what size we are.

    For me it's not just about size though, it's about the acceptance of anything physically that may not be so 'acceptable' by society.

    That for me is what BP represents, that mean's that the individual promoting acceptance for ones size/shape may not be the most healthy person.

    A lot of these people aren't claiming that it's 'okay to be fat', because we all know it's not. And, we don't have to be health professionals to know that. It's about accepting ourselves in the shape that we are warts and all.....

    I don't have a problem with it...
    edited August 22
  • aokoyeaokoye Posts: 2,771Member Member Posts: 2,771Member Member
    Phirrgus wrote: »
    aokoye wrote: »
    MikeRobi81 wrote: »
    Fat acceptance shouldn't be a thing. Everyone should try to be as healthy as they can be. People like Tess Holliday has a huge negative impact on the health of her followers. This movement wants Doctors (medical professionals) to stop using the medical term "obesity" and that is just wrong. I'm against fat shaming, no one should be bullied.

    Body positivity is a lot more than just "fat acceptance".

    Peoples perceptions of any movement will always swing towards the most vocal, most public proponents of that movement. I know you know that, I just think it's important to point that out for awareness.

    Indeed, indeed. I couldn't agree more, even if it's a frustrating reality.
  • PhirrgusPhirrgus Posts: 1,883Member Member Posts: 1,883Member Member
    aokoye wrote: »
    Phirrgus wrote: »
    aokoye wrote: »
    MikeRobi81 wrote: »
    Fat acceptance shouldn't be a thing. Everyone should try to be as healthy as they can be. People like Tess Holliday has a huge negative impact on the health of her followers. This movement wants Doctors (medical professionals) to stop using the medical term "obesity" and that is just wrong. I'm against fat shaming, no one should be bullied.

    Body positivity is a lot more than just "fat acceptance".

    Peoples perceptions of any movement will always swing towards the most vocal, most public proponents of that movement. I know you know that, I just think it's important to point that out for awareness.

    Indeed, indeed. I couldn't agree more, even if it's a frustrating reality.
    It is. All the more important to have discussions about the various facets of the issue, but incredibly difficult at times to keep it from being derailed by those readily available, very large broad brushes.

    Sometimes being able to reach an understanding with even a single person on a given misconception is very much a win, much less the crowd out there.
  • aokoyeaokoye Posts: 2,771Member Member Posts: 2,771Member Member
    Phirrgus wrote: »
    aokoye wrote: »
    Phirrgus wrote: »
    aokoye wrote: »
    MikeRobi81 wrote: »
    Fat acceptance shouldn't be a thing. Everyone should try to be as healthy as they can be. People like Tess Holliday has a huge negative impact on the health of her followers. This movement wants Doctors (medical professionals) to stop using the medical term "obesity" and that is just wrong. I'm against fat shaming, no one should be bullied.

    Body positivity is a lot more than just "fat acceptance".

    Peoples perceptions of any movement will always swing towards the most vocal, most public proponents of that movement. I know you know that, I just think it's important to point that out for awareness.

    Indeed, indeed. I couldn't agree more, even if it's a frustrating reality.
    It is. All the more important to have discussions about the various facets of the issue, but incredibly difficult at times to keep it from being derailed by those readily available, very large broad brushes.

    Sometimes being able to reach an understanding with even a single person on a given misconception is very much a win, much less the crowd out there.
    Agreed, that's typically my approach offline, though there it's really a matter of picking my battles and saving my energy. Of course, sometimes it's an issue of people not wanting to change their perceptions. At that point it becomes a question of how much I actually want to spend time with the person, how easy is it to avoid XYZ topic(s), is it worth maintaining contact with the person, etc.
  • PhirrgusPhirrgus Posts: 1,883Member Member Posts: 1,883Member Member
    aokoye wrote: »
    Phirrgus wrote: »
    aokoye wrote: »
    Phirrgus wrote: »
    aokoye wrote: »
    MikeRobi81 wrote: »
    Fat acceptance shouldn't be a thing. Everyone should try to be as healthy as they can be. People like Tess Holliday has a huge negative impact on the health of her followers. This movement wants Doctors (medical professionals) to stop using the medical term "obesity" and that is just wrong. I'm against fat shaming, no one should be bullied.

    Body positivity is a lot more than just "fat acceptance".

    Peoples perceptions of any movement will always swing towards the most vocal, most public proponents of that movement. I know you know that, I just think it's important to point that out for awareness.

    Indeed, indeed. I couldn't agree more, even if it's a frustrating reality.
    It is. All the more important to have discussions about the various facets of the issue, but incredibly difficult at times to keep it from being derailed by those readily available, very large broad brushes.

    Sometimes being able to reach an understanding with even a single person on a given misconception is very much a win, much less the crowd out there.
    Agreed, that's typically my approach offline, though there it's really a matter of picking my battles and saving my energy. Of course, sometimes it's an issue of people not wanting to change their perceptions. At that point it becomes a question of how much I actually want to spend time with the person, how easy is it to avoid XYZ topic(s), is it worth maintaining contact with the person, etc.

    Honestly @aokoye, your entire post here should be required reading under "rules of engagement" for every debate forum on the web.

    No matter how right or reasonable a person may be, if the other party isn't willing to listen/discuss/consider and so on, then nothing is truly gained other than the opportunity for each to air their facts and/or opinions/perceptions.

    It's truly gratifying when 2 diametrically opposed PoVs can meet in the middle, so to speak, and just as frustrating when it does not or cannot happen. The web provides a way for people who are willing to write off other people they don't understand with a few keystrokes, and I believe it's harmful in that light, but it also provides a way for people who are willing to put in the work to connect in ways that may never happen if not for the connectivity the web provides.

    Personally speaking, I know it's time for me to stop reading and typing when I'm up against a brick wall, or when I'm being obtuse myself lol. That perspective also serves well when I meet various people during the course of the day and remember any one of them could be someone I chat/argue/debate with online, and I meet a huge variety of people during the course of the day.

    My n=1 based on all of those meetings is that, if I am willing to be open/not_a_judgemental_idiot most folks from all walks of life are usually willing to respond in kind. It's incredibly liberating. I wish more folks would try it.
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