WOMEN AGES 50+ FOR APRIL 2020

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  • LisaInAR
    LisaInAR Posts: 2,021 Member
    Children's/YA books I read when I was a child--all from libraries, the only ones we had at home were Little Golden books for the very young:
    • All the Misty of Chincoteague (Marguerite Henry) books that I could get my hands on
    • All the Big Red books - Big Red, Irish Red, Son of Big Red (Jim Kjelgaard)
    • All the Black Stallion books I could find - there were 24 in the end (Walter Farley)
    • The first three Wrinkle in Time books - (Madeline L'Engle) - A Wrinkle in Time, A Wind in the Door, A Swiftly Tilting Planet
    • The first four Borrowers books - The Borrowers, The Borrowers Afield (1955), The Borrowers Afloat (1959), The Borrowers Aloft (1961) - (Mary Norton)
    • All of Heinlein's young adult books - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heinlein_juveniles
    • The Betsy-Tacy books - Betsy-Tacy (1940), Betsy-Tacy and Tib (1941), Betsy and Tacy Go Over the Big Hill (1942), Betsy and Tacy Go Downtown (1943), Heaven to Betsy (1945), Betsy in Spite of Herself (1946), Betsy Was a Junior (1947), Betsy and Joe (1948), Betsy and the Great World (1952), Betsy's Wedding (1955) - (Maud Hart Lovelace)
    • Island of the Blue Dolphins - (Scott O'Dell)
    • Watch for a Tall White Sail - (Margaret Bell)
    • The Fairy Book Series. The Blue, Red, Green Fairy Books. Unfortunately, my school library did not have the Yellow, Pink, Grey, Violet, Crimson, Brown, Orange, Olive, and Lilac Fairy Books (Andrew Lang)

    Thank you to whoever started these listings - reading provided everything that was good about my childhood and young adult years. There were so many more than these, but it's a good sampling.

    Love,
    Lisa in AR
  • Anniesquats100
    Anniesquats100 Posts: 1,808 Member
    Coffee 2d and tea more green. Although I hardly partake anymore of either. Even ice tea keeps me awake some.

    Annie in Delaware
  • 1948Peachy
    1948Peachy Posts: 1,511 Member
    Children's Books: The Secret Garden, The Little Prince, Grimm's Fairy Tales, Cheaper by the Dozen

    These were what I read starting in 3rd grade. I had to have a tutor teach me to read in 2nd grade because they learned at the end of 1st that I had memorized the Dick and Jane books and never learned to read. Once I learned how to read, books were a constant companion.

    Carol in GA
  • exermom
    exermom Posts: 5,777 Member
    Did the CardioCore 2 + 3 DVD. It’s ehhhh….if I didn’t have over 200 exercise DVD’s, I’d keep it. As it is, I’m not going to. The plan for tomorrow is to do Jeanette Jenkins Blast the Belly Fat DVD. I think I’ll like this one.

    Have a load of laundry in the wash right now.

    When I was at the soup kitchen Friday, the people got a bag of Girdelli chocolates. I can’t remember the last time I had Girdelli candy. I tell you, these people eat pretty good. Wonder Bread where as I get WalMart or Aldi brand, Girdelli candy (admitted, it was left-over Easter candy, but still…). One day they had prime rib. Friday they had a hogie – some sort of lunch meat, cheese, lettuce, oil, spices. Not something I would order. Then they got a bag of chips, some church made these crosses so a loaf of bread was attached to it (what a pain that was to put in their bag), cake/pie for dessert (as usual) and the bag of candy. This in addition to their to-go bag (they get one every Friday for something for the weekend)

    Luckee_me – you joined by posting! Welcome. Come back often

    Katla – I’m sure Arrow misses you, as does his owner. Hopefully, you’ll be able to go back to him soon

    M – give me tea. As far as I’m concerned you can throw out the coffee. No milk or sugar, just plain tea. Whatever color. Just not black tea.

    Katie – thanks

    Karen VA – I’m so sorry that happened to you

    Barbara – won’t even take the chance of anything coconut in the house because Jess is SEVERLY allergic to it. Even if it’s just in the air, she has a reaction. She’s already had to ask to be reseated at a restaurant if the person sitting next to her has something with coconut in it and the a/c is blowing in the right direction. She can’t eat the popcorn at Regal cinemas because it’s popped in coconut oil. It’s amazing the things coconut oil is in. She can’t use Banana Boat sunscreen, believe it or not, there are certain vitamins she can’t take.

    Made a donation to the Salvation Army today and I just couldn’t help myself, I had to go in the store. Got a food processor for $8. Honestly, it doesn’t look like it’s been used. But I am going to put everything that I can into the dishwasher. I figure I’ll take it down to the condo. Since I’ll probably only use it once or twice a year, I really don’t need anything great. Now the one I have at home is a good one. I think Vince needs to go to the post office later today

    Saw our neighbor when I left (the one who just came back from Afghanistan). He’s looking good. Said that he’s self-quarrantining at home for 14 days which is fine.

    Ordered the car seat and will have it shipped to Denise. Decided to get her one of the ones she wanted. This way she can’t complain…lol

    Welcome everyone new !

    Bananas – surveillance drones??? That would freak me out. Sounds like Big Brother, too eeery Why does the government feel these are necessary?

    Michele NC
  • sh0tzz99
    sh0tzz99 Posts: 726 Member
    edited April 2020
    Machka9 wrote: »
    Machka9 wrote: »

    More on group work ... just got an email from my instructor that I'm right. We are supposed to come up with a research plan (as if we were PhD students) ... we are not writing a research paper!

    Hopefully that redirects my group members who want to write a research paper!

    Instructors often think that assigning group work teaches students to work in teams, improves communication, etc. so that students will be better prepared for the workforce ... but it doesn't. Group work makes me feel like I'm 5 years old and "telling" on the other students because they're not doing the right thing. I hate that! And then we have to do "peer reviews" where we're forced to tell on each other. "Johnny didn't write his section properly". In the workforce, we do discuss things and have different ways of approaching things, but the goal is so much clearer and we're looking for a more effective and efficient way of attaining the goal.


    Machka in Oz

    The fault in the thinking is that most masters level students (in the USA anyway) have already been in the workforce for some amount of time and work in teams accordingly. I didn't learn anything from group projects in classes. They just frustrated me. I resigned to just doing the work for the group (at least it flowed better that way), assigning sections to present to the members, and taking the grade knowing I did the best job I could and my grade at least reflected my effort. I was not reliant upon others. This is not necessarily the proper method, but I didn't have time for nonsense. I was working full time, after all.

    Tina in CA
  • JRsLateInLifeMom
    JRsLateInLifeMom Posts: 2,275 Member
    Only time research like that works is if like minded group of academically matched friends/coworkers get together on a project. All other times horror memories.

    Amber Tx

    Decided Spaghetti for the family
    Noticing my seasonings are taking a big hit since the virus so less y less available. Good news is using the old ones up.
    v4ydjt6rofv5.jpeg

    In a Tupperware added the vegan 🌱 pasta sauce,corn water (canned corn) y olive oil
    Frying the corn in tap water
    Boiling veggie noodles

    JR loves it but have to pick the corn out.
  • cityjaneLondon
    cityjaneLondon Posts: 10,609 Member
    edited April 2020
    I can't work in groups at all. My lowest score on the VIA test for strengths was team work. :o I don't mind being just a lackey if I trust the person in charge. I have to trust them and will have checked that out carefully. That's like being on an aircraft and you have to trust the pilot. I don't mind being in charge - the leader. I was a teacher, and director, and facilitator for many groups over the years and very good at it. That's like being the pilot. What I can't stand is the ambiguity of a group where no one is in charge and the idiot has the loudest voice. I always vote out. I have been told off for not being a good team worker on rare occasions, but generally I have avoided situations which are ambiguous. I plough my own furrow and don't put myself in situations where I have to endure other people's shortcomings. I can do it perfectly if I am in the teacher role, otherwise - no thank you! I must be the most intolerant person on the planet!

    Run was good. Then I watched a BBC programme about primates. I was worried about the commentary as I don't like the person doing the voice over, but actually that was ok. I also usually hate the music, but that was ok. What I hated was the stupid slomo sections. Grrrrrr! Why do they keep on doing that? :#
    I'm watching a crafting programme every day at 5pm. I have no intention of doing any of the crafts, but I find it strangely soothing to watch other people.

    Thanks to those who replied to my plant dilemma. I will check it out now.

    Love Heather UK xxxxxxxx
  • trucker743
    trucker743 Posts: 393 Member
    The Questions

    1. Where are you from originally? I was born and raised in a suburb of Columbus, Ohio called Upper Arlington. There is no Lower, Middle, or even plain Arlington. After a fantastic education and a few years of nearly terminal boredom due to bad choices to relieve it, I moved to Arcadia, Monrovia, El Monte and Whittier in the LA area of California, then Alameda, Berkeley, El Cerrito and Richmond in the San Francisco area, and then to Salinas, which is the area around Monterey CA that John Steinbeck wrote about. I then moved to Eugene and Junction City Oregon, and finally Key Center, Tacoma, Fife, Milton, Richmond Beach, NW Queen Anne, Mountlake Terrace (I was slowing down, actually lived several years in the last three due to figuring out kids did better staying in the same school district!) and have now lived in the same house in my nudist resort in Issaquah WA for 22 years. First home for both my husband and I, and therein lie many tales.

    2. Do you eat breakfast? I eat what I’ve grown to call First Meal, which is 2cups of coffee and a protein shake, mixed, and warmed back to low coffee temp. That’s usually by noon.

    3. Do you prefer to dine in, carry out, or cook at home? Carry out in these times. I DO enjoy finer dining now and then with friends or alone.

    4. Favourite Girl Scout Cookie? I enjoy Samoa’s, but my favorite has to be the Thin Mints or the shirtbread ones, although I forget what they’re called. Nowadays I usually buy a couple of boxes, but exercise the Send Them To the Troops option.

    5. Do you listen to music when you work? Oh dear no! Except for the years I drove a truck, any kind of distraction has always driven me nuts at work.

    6. What is your favorite sonic drink? Coke Zero

    7. What is your favorite board/card game? Scrabble and Monopoly, Mexican Train dominos, Banco and Canasta

    8. What are your favorite podcasts? Stuff You Mussed In History Class, The History of Literature and This American Life

    9. What is your dream sandwich? Prime rib dip, no cheese, a few carmelized onions, on a fresh buttered grilled hoagie roll.

    10. What makes you gag? The least whiff or taste of sour milk - which is odd, because I like yogurt, cottage cheese and sour cream.

    11. What are your hobbies? This and surfing the net and crochet sometimes.

    12. What is one thing that can make your day instantly better? Getting in the car. Doesn’t matter where or what, except hospital type emergencies. Best if I’m the driver or know the driver VERY well.

    13. What was the best vacation/trip you ever took and why? Probably the trips to my grandparents’ house every winter in Ft. Myers Florida from age 4 to 16. We were allowed to just bring our lessons then. We’d stay about 6 weeks, and fish, boat across the Caloosahatchee River and fish some more, play in the sand, and the house had about a 3-4000 book library! Talking to grandparents was one of my highlights. They’d had interesting lives.

    14. If you were an animal, what animal would you be? Probably a bonobo. They are sometimes called miniature chimpanzees. They are highly intelligent, live in a non-violent society, the culture is matriarchal, and they live in a warm climate that has abundant food. They also have a very vigorous sex life.

    15. At a party, where can someone find you? Somewhere away from the noise but still able to hear the music if I listen, seated on a comfy sofa or chair, small plate in lap, beverage (Coke Zero is as festive as I get!), talking to someone very interesting for any one of a thousand reasons.

    Sharon Near Seattle
  • cityjaneLondon
    cityjaneLondon Posts: 10,609 Member
    Yes, Kim, the ice plant, Carpobrutis adulis. It has become an invasive species in California and the Mediterranean and New Zealand. It was originally from South Africa. Apparently you can eat it! I'm not going to try.

    Love Heather UK xxxxxxxx
  • Katla49
    Katla49 Posts: 10,159 Member
    edited April 2020
    Lisa Tonkin Cope: Thanks for the beautiful rainbow. We all need one now and then. Welcome to a great group of women. :flowerforyou:

    SuziQ: I am happy you’re not lactose intolerant. I’ve learned to adjust to life with lactose intolerance. Whole milk is off of my list, but cottage cheese is okay. Lactose free milk and Lactose Free Cottage Cheese at several milkfat levels is readily available in stores near me, so I don’t have a worry. Evidently whatever turns milk into cottage cheese solves my problem. I like 2% milkfat best. DH buys lactaid cottage cheese to meet his needs. It has 6% milkfat. :star:

    Lanette: We have LED night lights, too. Ours are plugged into wall sockets near the floor so that a person can see where they’re going at night, but not disturb someone else who is asleep or shine bright light in anyone’s eyes. They automatically shut off in daylight. We got them at ACE Hardware & we are very happy with them. :bigsmile: My son and DDIL live in Virginia. Maybe when this mess is all done I’ll visit them at just the right time to see the pony round up on Chincoteague and Assateague. I LIKE that idea. Thank you for nudging my brain. :heart:

    Lisa: I’d forgotten about Madeleine L’Engle books! How could I forget??? I have only one left on my shelf, An Acceptable Time. A Wrinkle in Time would be a fabulous gift for my granddaughter! I’ll be hunting for a copy to send her. Perhaps I’ll order one for myself, too. :heart:


    I watched an interesting show on Animal Planet last night about the origins of he Corona Virus pandemic. The investigation started with the discovery of a tiger at the Bronx Zoo that came down with the Corona Virus. (That tiger has recovered and is now doing okay). A group of zoos decided to investigate and the trail led to a live animal market in China. Several TV Veterinarians also participated in the program. I’m glad I saw it. The live animal market video taken in China was a combination of disgusting and heart wrenching. It is appalling to see such callous treatment of living animals. :heart: :brokenheart:

    Katla in Beautiful NW Oregon
  • margaretturk
    margaretturk Posts: 4,609 Member
    edited April 2020
    Having taught Kindergarten and second grade there are so many wonderful children books out there.

    I too love the The Little Prince

    Picture Book Author's I particularly love Dr. Seuss (The Places You Go), Mo Williams (Gerald and Piggy ),Tommy dePaolo (The Quilt Story), Paul Goble , Louis Ehlert , Eric Carle (The Grouchy Ladybug), Bill Martin (Chickchicka Boom Boom) Margaret Wise Brown (The Important Book), Robert MaCloskey (Make Way for Ducklings), Nick Bruel (Bad Kitty), Cythnia Rylant ( Henry and Mudge), Byrd Baylor (Everybody Needs a Rock), Patricia Palocco, Nancy Carlson (How to Lose All Your Friend's)... I could go on.

    Upper elementary. Wonder, Charlotte's Web...

    Adult...Recent Beauty in the Broken Places
  • sh0tzz99
    sh0tzz99 Posts: 726 Member
    Yes, Kim, the ice plant, Carpobrutis adulis. It has become an invasive species in California and the Mediterranean and New Zealand. It was originally from South Africa. Apparently you can eat it! I'm not going to try.

    Love Heather UK xxxxxxxx

    Iceplant is not native to CA. However, if we plant it on the hillsides and canyons near our homes in So. Cal, it lowers our homeowners insurance rates, as it is fire resistant.

    Tina in CA
  • trucker743
    trucker743 Posts: 393 Member
    Karen in VA, I am in total agreement with your feeling about masking. I am sad that you feel this might be the end of your job where you seem to have enjoyed working.

    Julie, I’m not usually a fan of conspuracy theories in general. I tend to find them amusing. But I’ve heard of the theory you mention, and can see the logic and it makes me watch the trends internationally VERY carefully. It only makes sense that corporations and governments would find this emotional climate a good one to introduce measures that are, after all “only to protect you”, as they will say.

    Lisa in AR, your early reading list is very close to mine except add ALL the Louisa May Alcott books except her very early penny dreadfuls, which I found and read as an adult. Also most of Mark Twain’s books, and most Edgar Rice Burroughs, including Tarzan series and John Carter Mars series. My mom then pointed me as an early adolescent to Kenneth Roberts’ and James Street’s historical novels. And then I discovered Fantasy & Science Fiction magazine, which led me to more authors than I can list.

    Tina in CA, my sheep would do ANYTHING to get to the ice plant in the medians of the highways near Salinas CA. I found myself rounding them up at 2am while seven months pregnant and still in my nightgown, then repairing the break they’d made in their fence. I too have heard it’s edible. I wonder if it is related to prickly pear cactus, which also grows in that area. The fruits are quite good.

    I’m sorry to be so long-winded today. My word factory is running overtime today.

    Sharon Near Seattle
  • Katla49
    Katla49 Posts: 10,159 Member
    :flowerforyou:
  • JRsLateInLifeMom
    JRsLateInLifeMom Posts: 2,275 Member
    My walking app is crowded today
    higwv7ku488a.jpeg
    Amber Tx
  • Anniesquats100
    Anniesquats100 Posts: 1,808 Member
    I have a cow milk allergy- no butter milk or cheese. But I do fine with goat's milk because it is somehow different enough. So I can have goat milk cheese too. It tastes a little tangy but I get used to it.

    Annie in Delaware
  • nannersp61
    nannersp61 Posts: 2,315 Member
    edited April 2020

    "Amber Tx

    Decided Spaghetti for the family
    Noticing my seasonings are taking a big hit since the virus so less y less available. Good news is using the old ones up. "
    Amber--
    Since you live in the south, growing your own herbs is super easy. It makes a lot more for your initial investment, you control how they are grown, no pesticide if you don't want it, easy to harvest and dry. Plants are easy to find at Walmart/ Home Depot or Lowe's. Look for Vigoro or Bonnie plants If you don't have garden space, you can use pots or grow bags on a patio, anyplace that gets 6 hours of full sun. Easiest to grow: basil, oregano, chives, parsley, cilantro, sage and rosemary. A bit more work, thyme and marjoram( needs more water and attention)