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Fat Acceptance Movement

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  • ArmyofAdrianArmyofAdrian Member Posts: 177 Member Member Posts: 177 Member
    RobD520 wrote: »
    RobD520 wrote: »
    snikkins wrote: »
    Being severely overweight or underweight for that matter is unhealthy. We are naturally repulsed by things that are unhealthy. I don't spend a lot of time worrying about it, but all other things being equal, I do have a lower opinion of people who are obviously unhealthy than of people who appeared to be good physical condition. It's a logical reaction.

    I don't think we as a species are naturally repulsed by things that are unhealthy. You might be, but I'd think you'd be in a minority, there.

    In scientific circles, there is widespread agreement that disgust evolved to motivate the avoidance of contact with disease-causing organisms. But hey, there are some weird fetishes out there, so whatever floats your boat.

    If you would be so kind as to cite you references here I would be grateful.

    An evolutionary advantage to avoiding people who are overweight actually does not make any sense.

    But the good news is that if there is widespread agreement, you will favor me with a nice list of specific scientific references.

    I'll save you the burden of a simple google search. http://pdescioli.com/papers/tybur.etal.disgust.PsychRev13.pdf

    This article does not speak at all to people's attitude towards overweight people.

    Someone else's obesity is not disease causing to me. It may not even be disease causing to them.

    As to "my problem", rudeness and arrogance from someone making a very poor argument is the source.

    You didn't ask for an article to speak to people's attitude towards overweight people, nor did I claim there was one. I said there was agreement "that disgust evolved to motivate the avoidance of contact with disease-causing organisms". You asked for a citation to support that. The article supports my statement. Now you're pretending you asked a different question. Hilarious.
  • RobD520RobD520 Member Posts: 420 Member Member Posts: 420 Member
    RobD520 wrote: »
    RobD520 wrote: »
    snikkins wrote: »
    Being severely overweight or underweight for that matter is unhealthy. We are naturally repulsed by things that are unhealthy. I don't spend a lot of time worrying about it, but all other things being equal, I do have a lower opinion of people who are obviously unhealthy than of people who appeared to be good physical condition. It's a logical reaction.

    I don't think we as a species are naturally repulsed by things that are unhealthy. You might be, but I'd think you'd be in a minority, there.

    In scientific circles, there is widespread agreement that disgust evolved to motivate the avoidance of contact with disease-causing organisms. But hey, there are some weird fetishes out there, so whatever floats your boat.

    If you would be so kind as to cite you references here I would be grateful.

    An evolutionary advantage to avoiding people who are overweight actually does not make any sense.

    But the good news is that if there is widespread agreement, you will favor me with a nice list of specific scientific references.

    I'll save you the burden of a simple google search. http://pdescioli.com/papers/tybur.etal.disgust.PsychRev13.pdf

    This article does not speak at all to people's attitude towards overweight people.

    Someone else's obesity is not disease causing to me. It may not even be disease causing to them.

    As to "my problem", rudeness and arrogance from someone making a very poor argument is the source.

    You didn't ask for an article to speak to people's attitude towards overweight people, nor did I claim there was one. I said there was agreement "that disgust evolved to motivate the avoidance of contact with disease-causing organisms". You asked for a citation to support that. The article supports my statement. Now you're pretending you asked a different question. Hilarious.

    Your implication seemed to be that this had something to do with people's feelings about obese people.
  • sunnybeaches105sunnybeaches105 Member Posts: 2,831 Member Member Posts: 2,831 Member
    JShailen wrote: »

    Her lack of putting in the effort others are putting in while simultaneously blogging about it in a "look at me" way, is what I find repugnant. Many of us know where we are in terms of performance, are humble about it, and try hard to improve. Look at what I actually wrote above regarding struggling hard and still failing being inspiring because of the effort. What I don't enjoy is watching self destructive behavior romanticized.

    I don't know you, so I don't know if you've ever been truly overweight/obese. I was, very much so. Morbidly obese. I didn't start exercising until I lost 140 lbs and became a healthy weight. I wish I'd started sooner but the reason I didn't is because of the attitudes of some people in this thread. Of course, it's my fault that I let other peoples opinions stop me...a mistake I hope to never make again.

    The thing that's inspiring about 'fat girl running' is just that, going out and doing it. I nearly cried the first time I went out for a run, and this was at a size 12. The mental hurdle is for many the hardest part, it was for me.

    I got fat for a while because I enjoyed eating and didn't care enough about my health. I fixed it because someone who loves me broke my balls about it. She didn't "accept" me not taking care of myself. If you're putting in the effort to change then I applaud that. Of course, that should have been crystal clear if you read what I wrote in this thread. I'm out. I have heavy legs day and a run to attend to.
  • Springfield1970Springfield1970 Member Posts: 1,945 Member Member Posts: 1,945 Member
    shell1005 wrote: »
    shell1005 wrote: »
    shell1005 wrote: »
    I think everyone who finishes a marathon gets accolades and a medal....because it's a pretty amazing accomplishment.

    Well I guess unless you do it while being overweight or obese...then you are someone who should be made fun of or told how not good enough you are.

    Everyone that can finish a marathon deserves respect, but I wouldn't call "amazing" a PB of 6:14...

    As watching those who finish with that time....and how every step is a struggle, I do. When I watch the Marathon, I wait...and those are the people I cheer for. Their brain wants to quit with every step and they keep going. Amazing.

    I have not been able to accomplish a marathon and if and when I do...no matter the time, it'll be an amazing accomplishment. I am sure others will poo poo it and try to tear it down, but it will still be amazing.

    I also find it laughable that there is an assumption that the runner we are speaking of is not trying to better herself because she has not lost weight. As if anything else is irrelevant. She has bettered herself by increasing her mileage. I even read her current goals and she is working on her pace and hoping to have something in the 10 minute mile as an ultimate goal. However the shaming judgment because she is not the size that is considered acceptable will probably always continue. It is part of our society where those who are fat (and especially those who are fat and female) are considered less than. I know I felt it when I was overweight and still witness it now that I am not.

    Gotta go now though. Gotta head out and pick up not one, but two race bibs. I won't win either of those races...so to some I probably shouldn't even bother. But those people don't matter and I will bother.

    You do know that everyone in a marathon slim or curvy or overweight is feeling like giving up on every step right?

    You almost come across as an inverse discriminator against normal and slim fit people.

    I'd even go so far as to say you have a chip on your shoulder.

    Either way I don't give a toss about any of your choices. As a parent, who's kid goes to school wit overweight kids who are ostracised, I very much care about the parents letting them get like that. Any pro overweight encouraging behaviour is screwing the future generation over as far as I'm concerned. I don't want my son growing up in such a destructive society.

    Thank god we live in England. I'm dual nationality and I'd be in big trouble if I lived in the states. It's a quagmire of gluttony.

    Nah, I was talking about the people I was watching running...of all shapes and sizes. I was watching people running with pain on their faces and some with pained years in their eyes. Many looked like everything in them wanted to stop & instead they kept going.

    If cheering for them and feeling that their marathon accomplishments shouldn't be diminished because of their shape or time or they didn't work hard enough for it while doing 26.2...makes it so I have a chip on my shoulder, so be it.

    I wasn't referring to you 'cheering people who are struggling on' as the situation where you seem like you have a chip on your shoulder. You've manipulated the conversation here. I was referring to your general demeanour.
  • RobD520RobD520 Member Posts: 420 Member Member Posts: 420 Member
    shell1005 wrote: »
    shell1005 wrote: »
    I think everyone who finishes a marathon gets accolades and a medal....because it's a pretty amazing accomplishment.

    Well I guess unless you do it while being overweight or obese...then you are someone who should be made fun of or told how not good enough you are.

    Everyone that can finish a marathon deserves respect, but I wouldn't call "amazing" a PB of 6:14...

    As watching those who finish with that time....and how every step is a struggle, I do. When I watch the Marathon, I wait...and those are the people I cheer for. Their brain wants to quit with every step and they keep going. Amazing.

    I have not been able to accomplish a marathon and if and when I do...no matter the time, it'll be an amazing accomplishment. I am sure others will poo poo it and try to tear it down, but it will still be amazing.

    I also find it laughable that there is an assumption that the runner we are speaking of is not trying to better herself because she has not lost weight. As if anything else is irrelevant. She has bettered herself by increasing her mileage. I even read her current goals and she is working on her pace and hoping to have something in the 10 minute mile as an ultimate goal. However the shaming judgment because she is not the size that is considered acceptable will probably always continue. It is part of our society where those who are fat (and especially those who are fat and female) are considered less than. I know I felt it when I was overweight and still witness it now that I am not.

    Gotta go now though. Gotta head out and pick up not one, but two race bibs. I won't win either of those races...so to some I probably shouldn't even bother. But those people don't matter and I will bother.

    You do know that everyone in a marathon slim or curvy or overweight is feeling like giving up on every step right?

    You almost come across as an inverse discriminator against normal and slim fit people.

    I'd even go so far as to say you have a chip on your shoulder.

    Either way I don't give a toss about any of your choices. As a parent, who's kid goes to school wit overweight kids who are ostracised, I very much care about the parents letting them get like that. Any pro overweight encouraging behaviour is screwing the future generation over as far as I'm concerned. I don't want my son growing up in such a destructive society.

    Thank god we live in England. I'm dual nationality and I'd be in big trouble if I lived in the states. It's a quagmire of gluttony.

    I have finished 10 full marathons. Some have only been uncomfortable for the last mile or so. Not everyone feels like quitting every step of the way. I have always been of the opinion that the people in the back of the pack were very courageous to fight through and finish.

    Parents allowing children to become obese is unacceptable. But this is a completely seperate issue IMO.
    edited April 2016
  • GaleHawkinsGaleHawkins Member Posts: 8,149 Member Member Posts: 8,149 Member
    jgnatca wrote: »
    I take the stance that everyone benefits from healthier choices. I won't assume that an overweight person has failed in this department. Here is an example of a positive model:

    http://fatgirlrunning-fatrunner.blogspot.ca/?m=1

    Heck, we just lost Prince at fifty-seven. We won't know for a few weeks what felled him but my bet is heart attack.

    mirror.co.uk/3am/celebrity-news/live-prince-dead-updates-reaction-7805506

    It was mentioned they are trying to get the records of his hospital visit 6 days before his death.

    It's Prince. My bet is on drugs. Another very unhealthy habit that has been romanticized and excused.

    dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3555292/Prince-s-former-drug-dealer-reveals-extent-addiction.html

    I just read this from a UK rag. Not sure why the drug dealer is going public if this is all factual.
  • Expatmommy79Expatmommy79 Member, Premium Posts: 940 Member Member, Premium Posts: 940 Member
    Where does Whitney Thorpe fit into all this?

    I find her commitment to exercise commendable, but her not really addressing the diet part of the equation to attain "health" a bit frustrating.

    I know she sees a dietician, but I don't know if she has lost any weight?

    I'm a season behind, so not really sure where she is at now or where her campaign is going.
  • tomtebodatomteboda Member Posts: 2,171 Member Member Posts: 2,171 Member
    I don't know what definition of obesity you are using, but we're going to have to agree to disagree. I'm going with the CDC's definition of obesity: "Weight that is higher than what is considered as a healthy weight for a given height is described as overweight or obese. " A weight that is higher than what is healthy would be unhealthy.

    Also, the AMA, The World Health Organization, Food and Drug Administration (FDA), National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists each recognize obesity as a disease. A disease is included in the set of things that are unhealthy.

    Of course, the line between healthy and unhealthy is uniform for a height regardless of any other factors? That seems very, very arbitrary to me. The BMI definition of obesity is population-statistical. It's uninformative for any individual.
  • strozmanstrozman Member Posts: 2,629 Member Member Posts: 2,629 Member
    Shana67 wrote: »
    I think that shaming people for the size of their bodies is unbelievably cruel and should not happen, ever. Having said that, it is worrisome to me that it is becoming socially acceptable to be so very overweight. It is super unhealthy and can lead to early death. But, I can only do so much in my little corner of the world, so I encourage my girls to eat right and get decent amounts of exercise, and talk to them openly (and kindly) about the dangers of being obese.

    kuftae wrote: »
    It seems silly. Nobody should be made fun of for their weight but it should be acceptable to have a fact-based candid discussion with somebody you care about concerning their weight if it becomes a medical issue.

    This + 2
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