Teacher says Pop Tarts are not a healthy snack

Options
18911131428

Replies

  • TonyB0588
    TonyB0588 Posts: 9,520 Member
    Options
    mom22dogs wrote: »
    In my opinion, something that derives all of it's calories from sugar and fat, and has no other real nutrients in it, is junk food, and looking at the nutritional value of poptarts, that's what they are, fat and sugar, which I personally wouldn't want my kid to eat. I would rather they eat an apple, or veggies, or something like that.

    I also think that schools are trying to teach kids about nutrition because unfortunately, not everyone teaches their kids about making good choices for food. I can understand you being upset, but I can also understand the school as well.

    So kids who have medical conditions who can not eat fruits and vegetables without serious pain and GI issues should be forced to go hungry because what is healthy for them is different than what is healthy for you?

    NO. In this case the parent would send a letter or a doctor's certificate pertaining to that child's specific condition.
  • TonyB0588
    TonyB0588 Posts: 9,520 Member
    Options
    I went to my kids school this morning, to speak with his first grade teacher.
    He came home yesterday saying he couldn"t bring his Pop tart for their morning snack, because they can only have "healthy snacks".

    I was upset. I still am even after speaking with the teacher this morning.
    I teach my child that there are no good or bad foods, unless you have a allergy or ethically cant eat it.

    He has been sitting there afraid to pull out his "unhealthy snack" because its not "fruit, or granola bar, or yogurt"(healthy snacks").
    I often send those as well.

    I told her not to teach my child about foods being good or bad, because I dont subscribe to that.

    Teacher: "So you're ok with him having a sugary Pop Tart in the morning"?
    Me: Yes, I if send it its good enough for him to have. Just so you know there are granola bars with just as much or more sugar in them as Pop Tarts.
    Teacher: blank stare.

    Do teachers have the right to teach children sugary snacks are unhealthy?

    Are Pop tarts the devil?

    There are concerns all over the world about childhood obesity, and these types of policies are not unfamiliar to me. Not sure if they're legally enforceable, but I guess it depends on your particular country or state.

    Here on MFP we usually think of the equation of Calories In and Calories Out and the resulting Calorie Deficit. If a child is taking in a lot of extra calories, he or she has to be also burning extra calories through activity.

    A quick Google search indicates Pop Tarts are high in fat, sugar, sodium, and additives, yet offer little nutritional value.

    Good habits have to be taught, and at one time the school was one pillar of society where this occurred. Now it has become very awkward for schools and teachers to teach anything that might conflict with changing values in society.
  • mrmarkharding
    mrmarkharding Posts: 7 Member
    Options
    TonyB0588 wrote: »
    I went to my kids school this morning, to speak with his first grade teacher.
    He came home yesterday saying he couldn"t bring his Pop tart for their morning snack, because they can only have "healthy snacks".

    I was upset. I still am even after speaking with the teacher this morning.
    I teach my child that there are no good or bad foods, unless you have a allergy or ethically cant eat it.

    He has been sitting there afraid to pull out his "unhealthy snack" because its not "fruit, or granola bar, or yogurt"(healthy snacks").
    I often send those as well.

    I told her not to teach my child about foods being good or bad, because I dont subscribe to that.

    Teacher: "So you're ok with him having a sugary Pop Tart in the morning"?
    Me: Yes, I if send it its good enough for him to have. Just so you know there are granola bars with just as much or more sugar in them as Pop Tarts.
    Teacher: blank stare.

    Do teachers have the right to teach children sugary snacks are unhealthy?

    Are Pop tarts the devil?

    There are concerns all over the world about childhood obesity, and these types of policies are not unfamiliar to me. Not sure if they're legally enforceable, but I guess it depends on your particular country or state.

    Here on MFP we usually think of the equation of Calories In and Calories Out and the resulting Calorie Deficit. If a child is taking in a lot of extra calories, he or she has to be also burning extra calories through activity.

    A quick Google search indicates Pop Tarts are high in fat, sugar, sodium, and additives, yet offer little nutritional value.

    Good habits have to be taught, and at one time the school was one pillar of society where this occurred. Now it has become very awkward for schools and teachers to teach anything that might conflict with changing values in society.

    Wow, I am impressed. Someone with a comment that is intelligent. Good for you, and thank you for trying to teach others here, to look at the positive, instead of just berating a teacher for making a comment to someones child.
  • mrmarkharding
    mrmarkharding Posts: 7 Member
    Options
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Are Pop tarts the devil?

    No, but the macro profile isn't great. A pack of 2 is (going from memory) about 400 calories, 72c, 10f, 6p or somewhere thereabouts. I agree the teacher has no business interfering unless they're exceptionally qualified to do so, and even then... That being said, a greek yogurt and some berries would be a better choice but whatever...

    For the record I love poptarts. I just use them as pre-legday fuel.

    It's a kid, and it's a snack. The OP seems like she otherwise feeds her child a well-rounded diet, so I'm sure his macros aren't lacking. If he's getting the proper nutrients and has a snack every now and then that doesn't have perfect macro ratios, I don't see the harm. Especially if the child is active and he's running and playing often.

    You realize most children in the US don't get the recommended amount of physical activity. Only 15% according to the Tufts University study linked below.

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/04/160405122618.htm

    That's because Moms and Dads spend all their free time on their phone, or tablet instead of going outside and playing with their children. They believe taking them to soccer on Saturday is enough. I live in a community of million dollar homes. My children are the ONLY ones told to go outside and ride their bikes. I have never seen another child ride a bike here in 8 years. Sad just sad.
  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 48,669 Member
    Options
    elphie754 wrote: »
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    pebble4321 wrote: »
    I know that I said this earlier but limiting snacks to only vegetables, fruits, yogurt, and granola leaves some students with NOTHING they can eat for snack because of medical reasons. So what happens to them? They starve or they get an exception and get bullied/made to feel guilty because what the teacher randomly decided was healthy isn't healthy for them?

    This is where I would expect a good teacher would set the expectations in class - everyone is having something that is healthy or good for them. Clearly accomodations need to be made for students with actual allergies or medical needs, as you describe, and it should certainly be done in a way that doesn't make the child feel bad. I still think it's a good idea to promote healthy eating in general for the sake of the kids who aren't getting that message at home. (To me, healthy eating includes the idea that some people have a different set of foods that are good for them.)
    Due to issues like this though, kids can't really celebrate things like their birthdays with classmates with cake or cupcakes. It's forbidden during school time. After school is a different story.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png


    My cousins school had what I thought was a really cool way around this. They still celebrated your birthday in class, but instead of bringing cookies or cupcakes, you had to bring something non-edible, like cool looking pencils, or stickers etc. My aunt told me the kids didn't even miss the treat food (let's face it, not everyone can bake lol) and still had fun/looked forward to birthdays in the class room.
    This is common now. Or the kids make a gift for the child.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

  • mrmarkharding
    mrmarkharding Posts: 7 Member
    Options
    I had a talk with my son yesterday after he came in from school.

    He said he had a good day, and that he doe not like pop tarts anymore and wont bother me for them when we go to the store.

    I told him he can still like them and no one will be mean to him. He says he will think about it.

    Folks, it was never ever about the fight of having a pop tart. It was about not having my child feel bad for eating a food. Now it's happened.

    I just want to say that I'm not going to go against the rules of the snack policy. That was never a thing.

    I just wish the teacher would have sent a note home when she trashed the first pop tart.

    I also wish she wouldn't have had him sitting there watching everyone else eat while his snack had been binned.

    My son and I talked about his not telling me the first time. He said he forgot. He's six by the way.

    I think I'm entitled to teach my children that foods are not unhealthy in balance and moderation.

    I see comments of my being lazy and not a good mother, for even giving my child a sugary snack.
    You are entitled to your opinions, even if it's rude and false.

    I've got work to do on this. Have a good one.

    Please go to your safe room now and reflect on how rude people have been to you because they disagree with your position. I am sorry your child has been scarred for life because a TEACHER was trying to what was best for a student, and a class, god forbid she singled out your child. Please keep your child in the plastic bubble.
    The simple fact is the TEACHER is right whether you want to believe it or not. A pop tart is not a healthy snack. Ask any dietitian or nutritionist.
  • Machka9
    Machka9 Posts: 25,120 Member
    Options
    I had a talk with my son yesterday after he came in from school.

    He said he had a good day, and that he doe not like pop tarts anymore and wont bother me for them when we go to the store.

    I told him he can still like them and no one will be mean to him. He says he will think about it.

    Folks, it was never ever about the fight of having a pop tart. It was about not having my child feel bad for eating a food. Now it's happened.

    I just want to say that I'm not going to go against the rules of the snack policy. That was never a thing.

    I just wish the teacher would have sent a note home when she trashed the first pop tart.

    I also wish she wouldn't have had him sitting there watching everyone else eat while his snack had been binned.

    My son and I talked about his not telling me the first time. He said he forgot. He's six by the way.

    I think I'm entitled to teach my children that foods are not unhealthy in balance and moderation.

    I see comments of my being lazy and not a good mother, for even giving my child a sugary snack.
    You are entitled to your opinions, even if it's rude and false.

    I've got work to do on this. Have a good one.

    I'm curious as to your motivation for starting this thread.

    What did you expect ... what were you hoping for?



  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 48,669 Member
    Options
    I'll just add that I supervise kids (enforce rules) at my DD's school during lunch. And kids bring all sorts of foods for lunch. A lot of sandwiches get thrown away. Bananas, apples, and packaged vegetables do too. So just because it's packed for lunch, doesn't always mean it's getting eaten.
    Also I notice the obese kids (just a handful) tend to buy 2 lunches. The tall and larger kids (like over 5'8) tend to too.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

  • bbell1985
    bbell1985 Posts: 4,572 Member
    Options
    At my school I'm just happy to see that a kid has some food to put in their mouths. 98% of my students live in poverty.

    I did see one of our 5th grade teachers "make" (strongly suggest) a child throw away his 2.5 serving sweet juice drink he was drinking for breakfast. Though I WISH that's not how he started off his day, I do think there was a better way to handle it.

    I get what you're saying. I personally wouldn't give my kid a poptart because I have probably eaten like 4 in my lifetime. But, the teacher maybe should have brought it up with you first.
  • bbell1985
    bbell1985 Posts: 4,572 Member
    Options
    It's also bull that there was nothing else to offer your son when the teacher made him throw it away. Every one of our classrooms has some pretzels for kids who are hungry or didn't bring a snack.
  • Packerjohn
    Packerjohn Posts: 4,855 Member
    edited January 2017
    Options
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    There is 16 g of sugar in a cherry poptart. And 4.5 g sugar per oz of grapes. So 1 poptart is equal to not quit 4 oz of grapes. That's like what 10-15 grapes if even that many. Sure grapes have other vitamins but still both can be in a good diet. Besides sugar is sugar doesn't matter if you get it from a soda or fruit it all becomes the same thing.

    Some nutrition study is needed if you're saying 4 oz of grapes are the same quality snack as a pop tart

    Same amount of sugar, different micronutrients, neither being particularly outstanding.

    http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/fruits-and-fruit-juices/1920/2

    Ask 100 registered dietitians their recommendation for a snack and I would be willing to bet 95%+ of them would pick the grapes over Pop Tarts.

    So you don't care about the actual nutrient contained but rather go for the "duh, of course grapes are healthy"?

    Which do you think dietitians would pick as the better snack choice?

    Instead of using the old Call to authority fallacy, try to think about WHY you think they'd pick grapes as a better snack choice and why you think they're a better snack choice. I outlined the nutrients in both to you as to why neither is particularly outstanding nutritionally, they're about equal if you compare them, so it certainly isn't because they're so much better nutritionally.

    So you forgot to answer my question.

    I personally have no problem listening to the advice of experts, especially when the experts would be in virtually unanimous agreement.

    I have not problem if someone want to eat Pop Tarts (I sure as hell am not) but saying Pop Tarts and grapes are the same nutritionally/have the same effect on the body is IIFYM gone horribly wrong.

    Look at the star rating for pop tarts from your own source:
    http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/baked-products/5212/2

    Pop Tarts get 1 or 2 stars, the grapes get 3 stars across the board, so according to your source grapes are better.

    Also, the information from your source is for 100 calories of grapes vs 200 calories of Pop Tarts so the nutrient values for the grapes are doubled.
  • Tallawah_
    Tallawah_ Posts: 2,471 Member
    Options
    Careful now, I've had an internet warrior blow up my inbox for having an opinion on the subject that doesn't fall in line with the OP. It won't stop. You could be next.

    Good grief! :unamused:

    Mind you given there are quite a few of us who didn't agree and aren't being hasselled maybe this a new flirting technique? :wink:
  • comptonelizabeth
    comptonelizabeth Posts: 1,701 Member
    Options
    I had a talk with my son yesterday after he came in from school.

    He said he had a good day, and that he doe not like pop tarts anymore and wont bother me for them when we go to the store.

    I told him he can still like them and no one will be mean to him. He says he will think about it.

    Folks, it was never ever about the fight of having a pop tart. It was about not having my child feel bad for eating a food. Now it's happened.

    I just want to say that I'm not going to go against the rules of the snack policy. That was never a thing.

    I just wish the teacher would have sent a note home when she trashed the first pop tart.

    I also wish she wouldn't have had him sitting there watching everyone else eat while his snack had been binned.

    My son and I talked about his not telling me the first time. He said he forgot. He's six by the way.

    I think I'm entitled to teach my children that foods are not unhealthy in balance and moderation.

    I see comments of my being lazy and not a good mother, for even giving my child a sugary snack.
    You are entitled to your opinions, even if it's rude and false.

    I've got work to do on this. Have a good one.

    I agree - the teacher should have brought it up with you first.
    Sorry you feel people were being judgemental- I hope you can look back over this thread and see that there were also a lot of supportive comments too,as well as informative ones. I never realised there was so much to a pop tart :smiley:
  • Tallawah_
    Tallawah_ Posts: 2,471 Member
    Options
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    There is 16 g of sugar in a cherry poptart. And 4.5 g sugar per oz of grapes. So 1 poptart is equal to not quit 4 oz of grapes. That's like what 10-15 grapes if even that many. Sure grapes have other vitamins but still both can be in a good diet. Besides sugar is sugar doesn't matter if you get it from a soda or fruit it all becomes the same thing.

    Some nutrition study is needed if you're saying 4 oz of grapes are the same quality snack as a pop tart

    Same amount of sugar, different micronutrients, neither being particularly outstanding.

    http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/fruits-and-fruit-juices/1920/2

    Ask 100 registered dietitians their recommendation for a snack and I would be willing to bet 95%+ of them would pick the grapes over Pop Tarts.

    So you don't care about the actual nutrient contained but rather go for the "duh, of course grapes are healthy"?

    Which do you think dietitians would pick as the better snack choice?

    Instead of using the old Call to authority fallacy, try to think about WHY you think they'd pick grapes as a better snack choice and why you think they're a better snack choice. I outlined the nutrients in both to you as to why neither is particularly outstanding nutritionally, they're about equal if you compare them, so it certainly isn't because they're so much better nutritionally.

    Everybody uses the 'Call to Authority' argument! It's just that we all have our preferred 'Authorities'! :smile:

    Who told you the sugar in PopTarts is the same as the sugar in grapes? :smirk:
  • Packerjohn
    Packerjohn Posts: 4,855 Member
    Options
    Tallawah_ wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    There is 16 g of sugar in a cherry poptart. And 4.5 g sugar per oz of grapes. So 1 poptart is equal to not quit 4 oz of grapes. That's like what 10-15 grapes if even that many. Sure grapes have other vitamins but still both can be in a good diet. Besides sugar is sugar doesn't matter if you get it from a soda or fruit it all becomes the same thing.

    Some nutrition study is needed if you're saying 4 oz of grapes are the same quality snack as a pop tart

    Same amount of sugar, different micronutrients, neither being particularly outstanding.

    http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/fruits-and-fruit-juices/1920/2

    Ask 100 registered dietitians their recommendation for a snack and I would be willing to bet 95%+ of them would pick the grapes over Pop Tarts.

    So you don't care about the actual nutrient contained but rather go for the "duh, of course grapes are healthy"?

    Which do you think dietitians would pick as the better snack choice?

    Instead of using the old Call to authority fallacy, try to think about WHY you think they'd pick grapes as a better snack choice and why you think they're a better snack choice. I outlined the nutrients in both to you as to why neither is particularly outstanding nutritionally, they're about equal if you compare them, so it certainly isn't because they're so much better nutritionally.

    Everybody uses the 'Call to Authority' argument! It's just that we all have our preferred 'Authorities'! :smile:

    Who told you the sugar in PopTarts is the same as the sugar in grapes? :smirk:

    Funny thing, his own authority that he linked says grapes are better than Pop Tarts.
This discussion has been closed.