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This decades “health woo”

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Replies

  • GottaBurnEmAll
    GottaBurnEmAll Posts: 7,722 Member
    lporter229 wrote: »
    lporter229 wrote: »
    I think the protein obsession is getting out of hand.

    That's because research is showing how important it is. The older you get, the more you need. Sarcopenia is no joke.

    Now. Putting it in foods like breakfast cereals and having the label scream "PROTEIN!" when it's a lousy source of low quality protein? That's silly.

    This is exactly what I am talking about. Also that I see post after post from 150 lb people asking how they can get 200g of protein in their diet.

    For some very lean individuals who are in certain situations (like cutting for contest prep), that is not actually an outlandish protein intake.

    I was listening to a Lyle McDonald podcast recently, and he was talking about how he had a group of people he dieted down to contest lean and they lost no muscle though most people doing contest prep usually do, and it was because he had them eating INSANE amounts of protein while training.
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    jdlobb wrote: »
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    jdlobb wrote: »
    Aaron_K123 wrote: »
    Anti-vax, anti-GMO, "organic", "natural". I'm not a terribly political person but for a while there I thought the right in the United States had a pretty strong lead in the conspiracy theory nutjobbery until I ran into these communities of "activists".

    none of these are unique to the left. There are TONS of believers in all of these among your right-wing, evangelical, suburb demographics. Especially anti-vax. The current, Republican, president is an anti-vaxxer.

    anti-GMO is more on the far left, but it also cut across political ideologies.

    Yeah, a lot of the anti medical stuff is kind of located where the extreme left meets the extreme right.

    it's generally symptomatic of mistrust of institutions, which is a common feature of left and right extremists.

    Agree. I've seen it among the same people who want to figure out how not to have a SocSec # and stuff like that.
  • jdlobb
    jdlobb Posts: 1,232 Member
    edited October 2017
    CSARdiver wrote: »
    jdlobb wrote: »
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    jdlobb wrote: »
    Aaron_K123 wrote: »
    Anti-vax, anti-GMO, "organic", "natural". I'm not a terribly political person but for a while there I thought the right in the United States had a pretty strong lead in the conspiracy theory nutjobbery until I ran into these communities of "activists".

    none of these are unique to the left. There are TONS of believers in all of these among your right-wing, evangelical, suburb demographics. Especially anti-vax. The current, Republican, president is an anti-vaxxer.

    anti-GMO is more on the far left, but it also cut across political ideologies.

    Yeah, a lot of the anti medical stuff is kind of located where the extreme left meets the extreme right.

    it's generally symptomatic of mistrust of institutions, which is a common feature of left and right extremists.

    I've always found this phenomenon fascinating as the extreme wings also trend towards authoritarian, yet both right and left mistrust institutions. Is this textbook transference in that the extremists do not trust people with power because they secretly know that they could not be trusted with power? ...but yet they are willing to commit violence to gain power.

    I don't know if it's transference, maybe. I think it's definitely a case of they don't trust OTHERS with power and want it exclusively for themselves.

    Interestingly, both groups can look at the same institution and perceive different, sometimes diametrically opposed, "others" as being the ones currently with power. A phenomenon I've always found fascinating.
  • NorthCascades
    NorthCascades Posts: 10,765 Member
    I don't think most people who don't like GMOs or vaccines want much power, most people don't. Obviously some turn their pet worry into a media career but got every one of those there are a thousand quiet followers who are just looking their day to day lives.

    I suspect they have varied reasons. One of the original OJ jurors voted not guilty because she took a pregnancy test that gave the wrong answer, and therefore didn't trust science.
  • jdlobb
    jdlobb Posts: 1,232 Member
    I don't think most people who don't like GMOs or vaccines want much power, most people don't. Obviously some turn their pet worry into a media career but got every one of those there are a thousand quiet followers who are just looking their day to day lives.

    I suspect they have varied reasons. One of the original OJ jurors voted not guilty because she took a pregnancy test that gave the wrong answer, and therefore didn't trust science.

    I absolutely think they want power, even if not for themselves individually, but for people who share their beliefs. That's still definitely definable as wanting power.
  • maryannprt
    maryannprt Posts: 152 Member
    vingogly wrote: »
    Hopefully, whatever the likes of "Drs" Oz and Mercola dream up, the fad for putting that vile plant kale in everything will go away. Almost any green is preferable to that devil's weed. :D

    Ha, ha. I love kale. I will agree that the idea of a "superfood" whether it's kale, quinoa, chia, pomegranate etc. is total hoakum.
  • Aaron_K123
    Aaron_K123 Posts: 7,121 Member
    jdlobb wrote: »
    Aaron_K123 wrote: »
    Anti-vax, anti-GMO, "organic", "natural". I'm not a terribly political person but for a while there I thought the right in the United States had a pretty strong lead in the conspiracy theory nutjobbery until I ran into these communities of "activists".

    none of these are unique to the left. There are TONS of believers in all of these among your right-wing, evangelical, suburb demographics. Especially anti-vax. The current, Republican, president is an anti-vaxxer.

    anti-GMO is more on the far left, but it also cut across political ideologies.

    There is a difference between saying "unique to..." and saying something is "subscribed to". I was saying the latter, never meant to imply it was an exclusive club. Sure, right-wing people can be anti Vax or anti GMO but those movements are heavily subscribed to by the left in a way that other conspiracies are not.
  • Aaron_K123
    Aaron_K123 Posts: 7,121 Member
    edited October 2017
    jdlobb wrote: »
    I don't think most people who don't like GMOs or vaccines want much power, most people don't. Obviously some turn their pet worry into a media career but got every one of those there are a thousand quiet followers who are just looking their day to day lives.

    I suspect they have varied reasons. One of the original OJ jurors voted not guilty because she took a pregnancy test that gave the wrong answer, and therefore didn't trust science.

    I absolutely think they want power, even if not for themselves individually, but for people who share their beliefs. That's still definitely definable as wanting power.

    Well defined that way anyone who wants to effect change or see change occur wants power. I'm not saying that is necessarily wrong but it is pretty broad.

    I think Cascades just meant on an individual level people don't choose to be outspoken and activist about those issues as a means of fame or power acquisition. Then again phrased like that really what activism is about power?
  • Aaron_K123
    Aaron_K123 Posts: 7,121 Member
    jdlobb wrote: »
    Aaron_K123 wrote: »
    jdlobb wrote: »
    Aaron_K123 wrote: »
    jdlobb wrote: »
    Aaron_K123 wrote: »
    Anti-vax, anti-GMO, "organic", "natural". I'm not a terribly political person but for a while there I thought the right in the United States had a pretty strong lead in the conspiracy theory nutjobbery until I ran into these communities of "activists".

    none of these are unique to the left. There are TONS of believers in all of these among your right-wing, evangelical, suburb demographics. Especially anti-vax. The current, Republican, president is an anti-vaxxer.

    anti-GMO is more on the far left, but it also cut across political ideologies.

    There is a difference between saying "unique to..." and saying something is "subscribed to". I was saying the latter, never meant to imply it was an exclusive club. Sure, right-wing people can be anti Vax or anti GMO but those movements are heavily subscribed to by the left in a way that other conspiracies are not.

    they're not by a long shot. the anti-vax and anti-gmo are absolutely minorities among the left. The left probably has more anti-GMO folks than the right does, but they're still a fraction of the whole. There are many of course who believe it for the marketing hype and think it's healthier, but that's is a MASSIVE difference from the ones who think GMO should be banned because they're unsafe. Lots of people "on the left" are pro-organic/whole food/natural, but not all of them are anti-GMO. Not by a mile.

    I think you are taking what I am saying to some ridiculous extreme in order to dispute that even though that isn't what I am saying. I never said that the majority, or even a large minority, of those in the left are anti-vax or anti-gmo.

    This is why I am not very political by the way, as soon as you stick a political label on something it becomes very hard to actually talk about it.

    ok, i see where I went off course.

    If we're just talking about tendency toward conspiracy theories, you're not talking about your average granola crunching hippy. You might find people with generalized apprehension of GMOs, but you will also find some hard core conspiracists who think that Monsanto owns the government, every FDA scientist is secretly on Monsanto's payroll, etc. (always Monsanto for some reason)

    We also have our share of moon landing deniers, flat earthers, and 9/11 truthers, and any other fringe nonsense you can think up.

    I think that acceptance of conspiracy theories is more MAINSTREAM on the right than the left, but I don't think either side has a monopoly or even a lead in crazy pants tin foiling.

    Totally understood, no worries man. Cheers
  • nvmomketo
    nvmomketo Posts: 12,020 Member
    VioletRojo wrote: »
    Chronic Lyme Disease
    Morgellon's

    Actually i know a woman that took 30 years to be diagnosed properly with Lymes. ...its a terrible disease.

    The lyme disease I'm referring to is the vague collection of symptoms that people have for years which are probably just general anxiety but since they can't accept that their brain is wrong they travel from doctor to doctor who all clear them health wise and then they wind up at a naturopath/herbalist who diagnoses them with Lyme disease.

    But Lyme disease is diagnosed with a blood test. If the blood test is positive, you have Lyme. Negative blood test, no Lyme. Hypochondriacs will always think they're sick with something, but Lyme is a legit and testable disease.

    I think that maybe what many object to is those who claim a health problem (lyme or hashimoto's) without a positive test, or being tested for it.

    Then again, science does fail. I am negative for hashi's in the lab but my thyroid stopped working a few years ago and I have other autoimmune diseases.