Coronavirus prep

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  • lemurcat2
    lemurcat2 Posts: 7,870 Member
    edited May 2020
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    NM lifting some restrictions today. Golf courses are allowed to open, non emergency medical services may resume, including voluntary surgery, state parks open for day use, and non essential retailers can provide curbside service.

    Most restrictions are in place until May 15 when we will start a phase 1 re-open. She will announce next Tuesday what phase 1 will likely look like. From what I understand from talking to people more in the know, it sounds like non essential retail will be able to begin in store operations at limited capacity, restaurants may open up to dine in at 20% of capacity, and gyms may open at 20% of capacity. We'll see if all of that is true, but that's the rumor.

    Ironically, the governor just announced an actual lockdown of the city of Gallup in McKinley county at the request of the mayor. The area has not really adhered to social distancing or stay at home measures and now makes up about 30% of New Mexico cases and they and San Juan County are the only counties that are seeing new case numbers and hospitalizations increase substantially on a daily basis. Most counties are seeing their new case numbers and hospitalizations decline. All roads in and out of Gallup will be barricaded by the National Guard, vehicles with more than two people will be cited by police, stores be further restricted in regards to hours of operation, and a curfew has been put into place.

    Oh, wow. That mayor was pro-active. So was your governor. I hope people everywhere in the U.S. take note.

    My surrounding town/zip code has had 73 positive results, 7 have died. 33,000 population, but dense population - it's a bedroom community to Seattle and really just a continuation of the metro area in general. People have been locked down for six weeks, but still it's hard to believe if you look out my window at the bike trail, river, walking trail. No one wears masks anywhere except inside stores.

    Wow -- my zip has had 596 cases, and its far from the worst zip in Chicago, We've allegedly flattened the curve too, but seems hard to believe.

    As I noted earlier most seem to be wearing masks and social distancing in this nabe, but it doesn't seem to matter.
  • cmriverside
    cmriverside Posts: 32,289 Member
    edited May 2020
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    NM lifting some restrictions today. Golf courses are allowed to open, non emergency medical services may resume, including voluntary surgery, state parks open for day use, and non essential retailers can provide curbside service.

    Most restrictions are in place until May 15 when we will start a phase 1 re-open. She will announce next Tuesday what phase 1 will likely look like. From what I understand from talking to people more in the know, it sounds like non essential retail will be able to begin in store operations at limited capacity, restaurants may open up to dine in at 20% of capacity, and gyms may open at 20% of capacity. We'll see if all of that is true, but that's the rumor.

    Ironically, the governor just announced an actual lockdown of the city of Gallup in McKinley county at the request of the mayor. The area has not really adhered to social distancing or stay at home measures and now makes up about 30% of New Mexico cases and they and San Juan County are the only counties that are seeing new case numbers and hospitalizations increase substantially on a daily basis. Most counties are seeing their new case numbers and hospitalizations decline. All roads in and out of Gallup will be barricaded by the National Guard, vehicles with more than two people will be cited by police, stores be further restricted in regards to hours of operation, and a curfew has been put into place.

    Oh, wow. That mayor was pro-active. So was your governor. I hope people everywhere in the U.S. take note.

    My surrounding town/zip code has had 73 positive results, 7 have died. 33,000 population, but dense population - it's a bedroom community to Seattle and really just a continuation of the metro area in general. People have been locked down for six weeks, but still it's hard to believe if you look out my window at the bike trail, river, walking trail. No one wears masks anywhere except inside stores.

    Wow -- my zip has had 596 cases, and its far from the worst zip in Chicago, We've allegedly flattened the curve too, but seems hard to believe.

    As I noted earlier most seem to be wearing masks and social distancing in this nabe, but it doesn't seem to matter.

    Most of the Chicago area is pretty tightly packed. When I say, "densely populated" I'm talking about 33,000 people, a little over 8 square miles, and 12,000 housing units. Dense in Washington terms. We're 12 miles from downtown Seattle, and we've been pretty lucky so far with this thing...other than that whole nursing home disaster.

    We also don't use mass transit the way Chicagoans do. No rail link that is widely used. Just buses.
  • rheddmobile
    rheddmobile Posts: 6,841 Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    TonyB0588 wrote: »
    lemurcat2 wrote: »

    With the lock down being effectively over in the USA where law enforcement are not authorized to mow down unarmed citizens with machine guns . . .

    Dude, what on earth?

    I noted I was only speaking about USA laws. The news article explains how states are removing more and more restraints on people. This will help prevent social unrest even if medically if it is a step backwards. No one knows what to do in these times.

    Even with the restrictions, nobody was authorized to mow down unarmed citizens with machine guns. This is the kind of rhetoric that is incredibly unhelpful. I don't even know how you got there. It's like some kind of fever dream fantasy.

    Have you been reading about the mental health issues related to COVID-19? I just see an undercurrent that is dangerous for the safety of law officers. Some are losing everything and we know alcohol sales are up and gun sales are up. Did you read Cwolfmann's link over the number of COVID-19 deaths?

    Law officers are starting to stand down over governors orders because they understand the time/risk factor on unproven restrictions is increasing. I think everyone posting here wants to do what is best and understand they are going to get COVID-19 sooner or later but want it to be much later.

    We know with the schools closed it is causing some kids harm because they may not have a safe environment and food like when the schools were open. The schools will not be opening in 4 months from now if we do not get more COVID-19 cases behind us. Sweden may be proven wrong yet time will tell.

    https://aljazeera.com/news/2020/04/sweden-avoids-full-lockdown-pm-insists-restrictions-continue-200420173945004.html


    According to some metrics, like alcohol sales, it is totally possible that people are drinking more. I still don't understand how you get to law enforcement being authorized to "mow down unarmed citizens."

    Maybe I'm wrong, but I read Gale to be sad police were not authorized to use machine guns to mow down unarmed citizens. I hope he corrects me if I am wrong.

    Alcohol sales are up across the board in the US. Gun sales are up in Kentucky, which might be affecting Gale's POV. Crime is up here, so I somewhat get it, although shooting a cop (or anyone) is still not in my imagination, so I don't get that.

    Alcohol sales are prohibited here as part of the curfew regulations - so there's less drinking. The curfew is keeping large numbers of people indoors - so crime is down.

    Apparently here the stay at home rules keeping more people at home (especially at night) means the gangs are more able to see each other and shoot at each other in some neighborhoods. Kittens.

    https://blockclubchicago.org/2020/04/17/drug-fueled-gang-feud-sparking-violence-on-streets-emptied-by-coronavirus/

    "Despite the pandemic, gangs in Irving Park and Albany Park are still feuding and even taking advantage of the empty streets to find their rivals more easily, the area’s police commander said Thursday afternoon.

    The recent uptick in shootings in the area is tied to drug sales and the gang feud, Albany Park (17th) District Police Cmdr. Ronald A. Pontecore Jr. said during an online community police meeting.

    The ongoing conflict also includes the February shootings that left a firefighter wounded in Albany Park and a woman shot dead in Irving Park.

    “I’m not going to sugarcoat it. We have a violence issue and it’s revolving around narcotics sales,” Pontecore said on the video conference call.

    For the most part, neighborhood residents are adhering to the stay at home order and the new social distancing rules in place to slow the spread of the coronavirus, he said.

    “But some of the people who aren’t are gang members,” the police commander said. “Right now we’re getting a lot of shots fired calls because with the streets clear it’s easier for gang members to spot each other when they’re out.”

    What I don't understand about this is if they know the neighborhoods at risk, why don't they just block the streets in the area off at night with checkpoints? They do this in Rome during the day to make sure nobody is just driving around without a reason. Once there are police all over, these guys don't go out.

    I don’t know about Chicago, but for the most part inner city gang neighborhoods in Memphis are foot traffic. And there are cop cars crawling all over at the best of times, everyone has long since learned to deal. You can’t ban people from their own homes, and the corner store is likely the only grocery, so you can’t ban people from going there either. Not to mention in the projects it’s one big building (or a group of identical buildings) with a courtyard.

    We can't have much foot traffic either--lockdown. The police stop you and ask where you're going, what you're doing, etc. My two oldest sons were at their office across the street and were stopped and questioned crossing the street to come home.

    Too bad, it's an opportunity to lockdown on crime. Here, they've been busting drug dealers if they stick their noses out the door. The dealers got desperate and had to send drugs by mail or special delivery. Busted.

    That level of movement restriction won't happen in the U.S.

    I agree with this. The history of police relations with communities is very different in America than it is in Italy.

    I remember martial law during a short period when I was a child. That was forty years ago. It’s not likely to happen again unless things get much worse than they are currently.
  • ExistingFish
    ExistingFish Posts: 1,235 Member
    ReenieHJ wrote: »
    Is it just me or does anyone else find themselves spending more a lot money now? And it's not really buying as in stocking up or hoarding; maybe it's buying the different items I wouldn't normally buy, at normal versus on sale prices. IDK. Example: bought a dozen eggs yesterday but had to pay 3.59 instead of 1.69. Bread is $4-5 instead of buying at the "bread store outlet" for 1.39 each. I usually wait for meat sales, buying chicken breasts for 2.49 # but now it's 4.49 #. Course, the extra ice cream/cookie purchases aren't helping anything. :/

    I think food prices are creeping up on us. I buy a lot of the same things, although a few more products than usual - but my grocery budget is significantly higher than it has been. I don't think if I bought the exact same thing it would be much higher, but I'm less picky - I buy whatever meat is available, not being able to pick what is on sale. I buy the expensive TP if it's in stock, because it's the only one in stock. Etc and etc.

    Good thing I'm saving on gas not going anywhere.
  • paperpudding
    paperpudding Posts: 7,616 Member
    ReenieHJ wrote: »
    Is it just me or does anyone else find themselves spending more a lot money now? And it's not really buying as in stocking up or hoarding; maybe it's buying the different items I wouldn't normally buy, at normal versus on sale prices. IDK. Example: bought a dozen eggs yesterday but had to pay 3.59 instead of 1.69. Bread is $4-5 instead of buying at the "bread store outlet" for 1.39 each. I usually wait for meat sales, buying chicken breasts for 2.49 # but now it's 4.49 #. Course, the extra ice cream/cookie purchases aren't helping anything. :/

    No, the opposite.

    am finding myself spending less money.

    My weekly grocery shop is up slightly - am not aware of buying extra so I put this down to no specials, some having to buy dearer brands if that is all thats available, being at home a bit more, therefore using more products - food, tissues, toilet paper etc

    But that over spend is way balanced by spending less on petrol, less eating out or spending out at activities (a few drinks at my sports club etc) no buying of clothes (some clothes shops are open here but the fitting rooms are not) or minor incidental purchases.

    However I am saying that from South Australia where restrictions are not as tight, nor are shop shortages as bad - and I am still working same hours as usual in essential service.
  • lemurcat2
    lemurcat2 Posts: 7,870 Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    TonyB0588 wrote: »
    lemurcat2 wrote: »

    With the lock down being effectively over in the USA where law enforcement are not authorized to mow down unarmed citizens with machine guns . . .

    Dude, what on earth?

    I noted I was only speaking about USA laws. The news article explains how states are removing more and more restraints on people. This will help prevent social unrest even if medically if it is a step backwards. No one knows what to do in these times.

    Even with the restrictions, nobody was authorized to mow down unarmed citizens with machine guns. This is the kind of rhetoric that is incredibly unhelpful. I don't even know how you got there. It's like some kind of fever dream fantasy.

    Have you been reading about the mental health issues related to COVID-19? I just see an undercurrent that is dangerous for the safety of law officers. Some are losing everything and we know alcohol sales are up and gun sales are up. Did you read Cwolfmann's link over the number of COVID-19 deaths?

    Law officers are starting to stand down over governors orders because they understand the time/risk factor on unproven restrictions is increasing. I think everyone posting here wants to do what is best and understand they are going to get COVID-19 sooner or later but want it to be much later.

    We know with the schools closed it is causing some kids harm because they may not have a safe environment and food like when the schools were open. The schools will not be opening in 4 months from now if we do not get more COVID-19 cases behind us. Sweden may be proven wrong yet time will tell.

    https://aljazeera.com/news/2020/04/sweden-avoids-full-lockdown-pm-insists-restrictions-continue-200420173945004.html


    According to some metrics, like alcohol sales, it is totally possible that people are drinking more. I still don't understand how you get to law enforcement being authorized to "mow down unarmed citizens."

    Maybe I'm wrong, but I read Gale to be sad police were not authorized to use machine guns to mow down unarmed citizens. I hope he corrects me if I am wrong.

    Alcohol sales are up across the board in the US. Gun sales are up in Kentucky, which might be affecting Gale's POV. Crime is up here, so I somewhat get it, although shooting a cop (or anyone) is still not in my imagination, so I don't get that.

    Alcohol sales are prohibited here as part of the curfew regulations - so there's less drinking. The curfew is keeping large numbers of people indoors - so crime is down.

    Apparently here the stay at home rules keeping more people at home (especially at night) means the gangs are more able to see each other and shoot at each other in some neighborhoods. Kittens.

    https://blockclubchicago.org/2020/04/17/drug-fueled-gang-feud-sparking-violence-on-streets-emptied-by-coronavirus/

    "Despite the pandemic, gangs in Irving Park and Albany Park are still feuding and even taking advantage of the empty streets to find their rivals more easily, the area’s police commander said Thursday afternoon.

    The recent uptick in shootings in the area is tied to drug sales and the gang feud, Albany Park (17th) District Police Cmdr. Ronald A. Pontecore Jr. said during an online community police meeting.

    The ongoing conflict also includes the February shootings that left a firefighter wounded in Albany Park and a woman shot dead in Irving Park.

    “I’m not going to sugarcoat it. We have a violence issue and it’s revolving around narcotics sales,” Pontecore said on the video conference call.

    For the most part, neighborhood residents are adhering to the stay at home order and the new social distancing rules in place to slow the spread of the coronavirus, he said.

    “But some of the people who aren’t are gang members,” the police commander said. “Right now we’re getting a lot of shots fired calls because with the streets clear it’s easier for gang members to spot each other when they’re out.”

    What I don't understand about this is if they know the neighborhoods at risk, why don't they just block the streets in the area off at night with checkpoints? They do this in Rome during the day to make sure nobody is just driving around without a reason. Once there are police all over, these guys don't go out.

    I don’t know about Chicago, but for the most part inner city gang neighborhoods in Memphis are foot traffic. And there are cop cars crawling all over at the best of times, everyone has long since learned to deal. You can’t ban people from their own homes, and the corner store is likely the only grocery, so you can’t ban people from going there either. Not to mention in the projects it’s one big building (or a group of identical buildings) with a courtyard.

    Yeah, mostly local foot traffic and also local car traffic is not banned.
  • mkculs13
    mkculs13 Posts: 494 Member
    Prices have definitely gone up, and not by a few cents; noticeable jumps (Madison, WI). I find some items haven't been restocked in over a week--canned fruit, for example. I didn't notice other specifics but saw enough blank space on shelves to make me wonder what was up. The canned fruit was a sale item from about 2 weeks ago, I think. I'm spending less in general but more at the grocery store, and I'm a "rut" shopper--stuck in a rut, always buying the same things. I have a decent supply of low-demand goods from early on in the closures (beans, mostly), which is good b/c if there is a shortage of meat, I'm sure more folks will be going after beans. I don't buy meat or fish or poultry, so I don't know if we've seen changes there yet.
  • Katmary71
    Katmary71 Posts: 5,052 Member
    I'm also spending more on groceries. Eggs are about double the usual. I normally get bulk items every week and things like dried beans at first were gone and now all bulk is either missing or pre-bagged like candy. I normally make beans from scratch but aside of black beans have been buying canned. I normally go to more than one store a week for sales, I've mostly been shopping every other and limit it to one store so I've had to suck up some of the prices. My local farmer's market started putting together a produce box for pick-up and that's been an affordable option plus the produce has been amazing.

    I'd been putting off getting seedlings until quarantine lifted but it's been extended so I went to the nursery yesterday. So many cars on the road, like a regular weekend afternoon. No parking at nursery, shortage of herbs and vegetable plants, probably 60% without masks, and I was about the 60th person in line. I drove by Lowes and it was crowded but not like the nursery. Seed companies and nurseries are definitely making some money this year!
  • JaxxieKat
    JaxxieKat Posts: 427 Member
    My grocery spending is up, because I'm buying through Instacart and paying large tips to show my appreciation. On the flip side, I'm not having to gas up my car, we're not going out to eat, I'm not going to Dunkin or Starbucks for coffee, so I think it is a wash.
  • rheddmobile
    rheddmobile Posts: 6,841 Member
    I spent a small fortune on my first two lockdown trips to the grocery because I couldn’t buy my usual brands and had to stock up. Since then it’s been less expensive for my family since I am eating out less, but more expensive since I am also shopping for my mom. It comes out about equal.
  • paperpudding
    paperpudding Posts: 7,616 Member
    I did hear some complaining where I live about toilet paper costs going up and supermarkets profiteerring :*

    On my usual source of reliable information - Facebook :D

    That didnt make a big difference to my overall shop as I only buy one 6 pack anyway - however it was previously stated that the production plant in my state was doing round the clock production instead of their usual business hours.
    naturally they then have to pay their staff over time and shift penalty rates and possibly have greater electricity costs if it isnt a plant that usually operates at night.
    A temporary increase in cost is therefore reasonable at the buying end.

    Amazingly the toilet paper shortage seems to have vanished as fast as it appeared - doing my weekly shopping on a Sat afternoon, all supermarkets/ shops in the shopping complex which usually sell TP, had plenty of it still by mid afternoon.
    Woolworths now has a 4 pack per customer limit - was previously 1
    4 packs! - thats up to 48 rolls - so basically you can buy as many as you want short of trolley full hoarding.

  • gradchica27
    gradchica27 Posts: 777 Member
    I’m probably spending more on groceries as well—and tipping for delivery. But I’m the other hand we are not eating out at all, no “I’ll grab something and meet you at the soccer game” for my husband, no weekly donut trip or pizza delivery, etc. not to mention no cruising the Target clearance racks when I’m thee to pick up one or two things...