Coronavirus prep

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Replies

  • Zoomie402
    Zoomie402 Posts: 260 Member
    mockchoc wrote: »
    Zoomie402 wrote: »
    I'm in Nebraska, and not much of the daily grind has changed here. It did for about 6-8 weeks, but now things are opening back up. I work at 3 COVID testing facilities, so I have dealt with a lot of the highs and lows. Personally, other than my kids having online learning, I still go about business as usual.

    The frustrating thing right now is that the schools still don't know how they are going to operate come fall. They allowed families to vote on 3 options, all of which are ugly....either A. We continue remote learning (which was a complete joke and left many kids, mine included, feeling set back) B. Schools split students down by 50% by rotating every other week. Again, not a great option since many parents will be back to work and daycare costs are outrages. C. Split the school day in half, with 50% of the kids going in the morning and the other 50% in the afternoon.

    As for prep, our shelves are well stocked in the stores, with the exception of Lysol wipes. Most businesses are back up and running, and more and more people are starting to come out. As of yesterday's press conference, the hospitals in my area still have 80% vents available, and 75% of beds available.

    I was incredibly sick in February, and testing negative for the FLU. One of the gals I was training just had an antibody test done because he mom was sick in January....they both had antibodies. If had the extra cash, I'd get tested because I am pretty much convinced I had it.

    Huh? You have to pay to be tested for Covid? We don't.

    I meant for the antibody testing, but yes....we have had people calling stating that they thought the COVID test was free. We send the tests through LabCorp and they have been charging nearly $100 for the test.

  • moonangel12
    moonangel12 Posts: 971 Member
    Zoomie402 wrote: »
    mockchoc wrote: »
    Zoomie402 wrote: »
    I'm in Nebraska, and not much of the daily grind has changed here. It did for about 6-8 weeks, but now things are opening back up. I work at 3 COVID testing facilities, so I have dealt with a lot of the highs and lows. Personally, other than my kids having online learning, I still go about business as usual.

    The frustrating thing right now is that the schools still don't know how they are going to operate come fall. They allowed families to vote on 3 options, all of which are ugly....either A. We continue remote learning (which was a complete joke and left many kids, mine included, feeling set back) B. Schools split students down by 50% by rotating every other week. Again, not a great option since many parents will be back to work and daycare costs are outrages. C. Split the school day in half, with 50% of the kids going in the morning and the other 50% in the afternoon.

    As for prep, our shelves are well stocked in the stores, with the exception of Lysol wipes. Most businesses are back up and running, and more and more people are starting to come out. As of yesterday's press conference, the hospitals in my area still have 80% vents available, and 75% of beds available.

    I was incredibly sick in February, and testing negative for the FLU. One of the gals I was training just had an antibody test done because he mom was sick in January....they both had antibodies. If had the extra cash, I'd get tested because I am pretty much convinced I had it.

    Huh? You have to pay to be tested for Covid? We don't.

    I meant for the antibody testing, but yes....we have had people calling stating that they thought the COVID test was free. We send the tests through LabCorp and they have been charging nearly $100 for the test.
    We have had some hefty bills from LabCorp in the past - I think they are $$$ for most everything. The local urgent care gave me a list of the prices for the place they use for general lab work and testing (we have a non-traditional health “insurance” and pay out of pocket for a lot of the small stuff) and it’s 75%-90% less for routine labs. Craziness!
  • Zoomie402
    Zoomie402 Posts: 260 Member
    Zoomie402 wrote: »
    mockchoc wrote: »
    Zoomie402 wrote: »
    I'm in Nebraska, and not much of the daily grind has changed here. It did for about 6-8 weeks, but now things are opening back up. I work at 3 COVID testing facilities, so I have dealt with a lot of the highs and lows. Personally, other than my kids having online learning, I still go about business as usual.

    The frustrating thing right now is that the schools still don't know how they are going to operate come fall. They allowed families to vote on 3 options, all of which are ugly....either A. We continue remote learning (which was a complete joke and left many kids, mine included, feeling set back) B. Schools split students down by 50% by rotating every other week. Again, not a great option since many parents will be back to work and daycare costs are outrages. C. Split the school day in half, with 50% of the kids going in the morning and the other 50% in the afternoon.

    As for prep, our shelves are well stocked in the stores, with the exception of Lysol wipes. Most businesses are back up and running, and more and more people are starting to come out. As of yesterday's press conference, the hospitals in my area still have 80% vents available, and 75% of beds available.

    I was incredibly sick in February, and testing negative for the FLU. One of the gals I was training just had an antibody test done because he mom was sick in January....they both had antibodies. If had the extra cash, I'd get tested because I am pretty much convinced I had it.

    Huh? You have to pay to be tested for Covid? We don't.

    I meant for the antibody testing, but yes....we have had people calling stating that they thought the COVID test was free. We send the tests through LabCorp and they have been charging nearly $100 for the test.
    We have had some hefty bills from LabCorp in the past - I think they are $$$ for most everything. The local urgent care gave me a list of the prices for the place they use for general lab work and testing (we have a non-traditional health “insurance” and pay out of pocket for a lot of the small stuff) and it’s 75%-90% less for routine labs. Craziness!

    It is craziness! Out of pocket here for the office visit and the test itself is $139. That's much cheaper than most insurances. I think, if anything, it's so SO important for people to understand how their own individual insurance works, especially for times like this! It should part of the prep.

  • cmriverside
    cmriverside Posts: 33,482 Member
    We have free testing in Washington State. Not for the antibodies test, but for the regular Covid test. You do need to have symptoms, though.

    The actual case numbers ARE much higher than test results suggest.

    If people are only getting testing who have symptoms, then the asymptomatic ones necessarily slip under the radar.

    Not only that, but if I got tested today, what's to say I didn't already recover OR that I catch it tomorrow? It only captures a small percentage and only active cases - so in a two to three week window.

    Until and unless every single person is tested for antibodies, no way to know the actual numbers. Since antibody testing is not 100% accurate and not everywhere is doing it we will continue to be under-reporting.

  • lemurcat2
    lemurcat2 Posts: 7,881 Member
    mockchoc wrote: »
    "Can we hit the 'reset button' on 2020 yet? I'd like my money back. :pCan we hit the 'reset button' on 2020 yet? I'd like my money back. :disappointed:"

    This has been the worst year or so in my whole life and I'm no spring chicken. My whole house was flooded and we had to live in a crappy dark flat for a year( oh and I also lost my car too) , I've just got out of the cardiac unit last week when I was out for the first time in months because of Covid having a BBQ with the family and nope I didn't get to eat the cake I made at 6am because an ambulance took me away. There is more but thank god I forget the rest now... been never ending. Right now we are allowed to go away so have been in a very nice quiet spot inland in our caravan. Very happy now. We caught 13 redclaw crayfish too in the river. Even more happy lol.

    I liked the '80s (I was mostly a kid), and I loved the '90s (still my favorite decade despite everything I disliked at the time). The '00s I thought were bad in that recall saying to a friend of mine in '10 that the '10s had to be better. They weren't. So far the '20s are worst of all. Not a good sign! Sigh.
  • lemurcat2
    lemurcat2 Posts: 7,881 Member
    trying very hard to keep this non political......

    If testing costs money, especially if you are uninsured, then obviously your actual number of cases would be much higher than the official stats and this would be disproportionately more so in the most at risk poor communities.



    Here in South Australia, our official number of active cases is 0.

    I am confident that is accurate as anyone can get tested at no cost - and they are. Anyone who has the slightest little sniffle gets tested and is self isolated until results come back (usually next day, 2 days at most)

    Anyone here (IL) who thinks they have it can be tested for free. The antibody tests are different (and I haven't researched them), and the protests plus looting have set back the testing in general. The test seems unpleasant so I'm sure lots who might have it don't test, although they could, given how much the mild symptoms overlap other things.
  • lemurcat2
    lemurcat2 Posts: 7,881 Member
    edited June 2020
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    We are at probably less than 1% mask use in public here. This is frustrating because it works best when everyone takes precautions.

    https://www.sfgate.com/news/editorspicks/article/Study-100-face-mask-use-could-crush-second-15333170.php

    Weird, we are probably at about 75% here from what I observe and indoor public space is required. Then again, I find the talk about second wave ironic as it's not clear anyone is out of the first wave, I don't think we are, and after the past couple weeks no way. But we are opening. (I realize again I'm being bitchy but I find it so unfair that I see so much more compliance around me than others report yet our numbers are so much worse, which until recently I just assumed was density and now is likely also protests, etc.)

    I agree with you. I'm also in Chicago and work at a Hospital in the SW suburbs. I dont think our first wave is over yet. The majority of our beds have been COVID since end of March and we are still mostly COVID, tho we are not currently using the overflow units and make shift ICU that was set up and used thru the end of May because we had more cases than beds available.

    Tough. Not surprised, but I'm sorry. I kind of think everyone has just decided that hospital resources can deal, so we are giving up in trying to do more. For what it's worth, I do think most around me are masked vs what some others are reporting (I'm basically in Lincoln Square).
  • GaleHawkins
    GaleHawkins Posts: 8,160 Member
    mockchoc wrote: »
    Zoomie402 wrote: »
    I'm in Nebraska, and not much of the daily grind has changed here. It did for about 6-8 weeks, but now things are opening back up. I work at 3 COVID testing facilities, so I have dealt with a lot of the highs and lows. Personally, other than my kids having online learning, I still go about business as usual.

    The frustrating thing right now is that the schools still don't know how they are going to operate come fall. They allowed families to vote on 3 options, all of which are ugly....either A. We continue remote learning (which was a complete joke and left many kids, mine included, feeling set back) B. Schools split students down by 50% by rotating every other week. Again, not a great option since many parents will be back to work and daycare costs are outrages. C. Split the school day in half, with 50% of the kids going in the morning and the other 50% in the afternoon.

    As for prep, our shelves are well stocked in the stores, with the exception of Lysol wipes. Most businesses are back up and running, and more and more people are starting to come out. As of yesterday's press conference, the hospitals in my area still have 80% vents available, and 75% of beds available.

    I was incredibly sick in February, and testing negative for the FLU. One of the gals I was training just had an antibody test done because he mom was sick in January....they both had antibodies. If had the extra cash, I'd get tested because I am pretty much convinced I had it.

    Huh? You have to pay to be tested for Covid? We don't.

    As of 8 June 2020 Kentucky stopped free COVID-19 testing now testing sights sign states to have out your ID and insurance card. This will keep down the number of positive tests to keep the number of new COVID-19 positive tests.
  • Noreenmarie1234
    Noreenmarie1234 Posts: 7,482 Member
    edited June 2020
    Zoomie402 wrote: »
    Zoomie402 wrote: »
    mockchoc wrote: »
    Zoomie402 wrote: »
    I'm in Nebraska, and not much of the daily grind has changed here. It did for about 6-8 weeks, but now things are opening back up. I work at 3 COVID testing facilities, so I have dealt with a lot of the highs and lows. Personally, other than my kids having online learning, I still go about business as usual.

    The frustrating thing right now is that the schools still don't know how they are going to operate come fall. They allowed families to vote on 3 options, all of which are ugly....either A. We continue remote learning (which was a complete joke and left many kids, mine included, feeling set back) B. Schools split students down by 50% by rotating every other week. Again, not a great option since many parents will be back to work and daycare costs are outrages. C. Split the school day in half, with 50% of the kids going in the morning and the other 50% in the afternoon.

    As for prep, our shelves are well stocked in the stores, with the exception of Lysol wipes. Most businesses are back up and running, and more and more people are starting to come out. As of yesterday's press conference, the hospitals in my area still have 80% vents available, and 75% of beds available.

    I was incredibly sick in February, and testing negative for the FLU. One of the gals I was training just had an antibody test done because he mom was sick in January....they both had antibodies. If had the extra cash, I'd get tested because I am pretty much convinced I had it.

    Huh? You have to pay to be tested for Covid? We don't.

    I meant for the antibody testing, but yes....we have had people calling stating that they thought the COVID test was free. We send the tests through LabCorp and they have been charging nearly $100 for the test.
    We have had some hefty bills from LabCorp in the past - I think they are $$$ for most everything. The local urgent care gave me a list of the prices for the place they use for general lab work and testing (we have a non-traditional health “insurance” and pay out of pocket for a lot of the small stuff) and it’s 75%-90% less for routine labs. Craziness!

    It is craziness! Out of pocket here for the office visit and the test itself is $139. That's much cheaper than most insurances. I think, if anything, it's so SO important for people to understand how their own individual insurance works, especially for times like this! It should part of the prep.

    In my county, they offer free antibody and regular testing for everyone (I had it done). I cant believe you have to pay in other areas!
  • ythannah
    ythannah Posts: 4,357 Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    trying very hard to keep this non political......

    If testing costs money, especially if you are uninsured, then obviously your actual number of cases would be much higher than the official stats and this would be disproportionately more so in the most at risk poor communities.



    Here in South Australia, our official number of active cases is 0.

    I am confident that is accurate as anyone can get tested at no cost - and they are. Anyone who has the slightest little sniffle gets tested and is self isolated until results come back (usually next day, 2 days at most)

    Anyone here (IL) who thinks they have it can be tested for free. The antibody tests are different (and I haven't researched them), and the protests plus looting have set back the testing in general. The test seems unpleasant so I'm sure lots who might have it don't test, although they could, given how much the mild symptoms overlap other things.

    I dont think the test is that unpleasant.

    I havent had it but I have had respiratory nasal swabs in the past testing for influenza and whooping cough and it is basically the same test method.

    Lots of people have been tested here, including children, and I'm not getting feedback that the test was horrible.

    I'll find out on Thursday are they are doing testing in our workplace.

    Our provincial premier has been pushing for increased testing so at this point, in our Health Unit area, anyone can get a test who wants one, symptoms or not. We are now up to a 10% per capita testing rate. A few weeks ago they started testing essential workers, starting with first responders and retail employees. I think at this point some health care workers have been tested a few times because there have been multiple test blitzes in the hospital and longterm care facilities.

    We are one of the regions with low case numbers so we were allowed to start re-opening some businesses on Friday. Hair/beauty service salons and dental offices can operate again. Restaurants can seat diners in outdoor areas only, with distancing. Malls can open.
  • lemurcat2
    lemurcat2 Posts: 7,881 Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    trying very hard to keep this non political......

    If testing costs money, especially if you are uninsured, then obviously your actual number of cases would be much higher than the official stats and this would be disproportionately more so in the most at risk poor communities.



    Here in South Australia, our official number of active cases is 0.

    I am confident that is accurate as anyone can get tested at no cost - and they are. Anyone who has the slightest little sniffle gets tested and is self isolated until results come back (usually next day, 2 days at most)

    Anyone here (IL) who thinks they have it can be tested for free. The antibody tests are different (and I haven't researched them), and the protests plus looting have set back the testing in general. The test seems unpleasant so I'm sure lots who might have it don't test, although they could, given how much the mild symptoms overlap other things.

    I dont think the test is that unpleasant.

    I havent had it but I have had respiratory nasal swabs in the past testing for influenza and whooping cough and it is basically the same test method.

    Lots of people have been tested here, including children, and I'm not getting feedback that the test was horrible.

    It looks and sounds unpleasant to me.

    https://www.nytimes.com/article/test-for-coronavirus.html

    1.17 million people have been tested in my state at this point, and it looks like about 1.8 m in Australia. (My state has about half the population of Australia.) So clearly lots of people here have been tested too, but I certainly wouldn't go test without having good reason to think I had it (it could be I'm a big baby about medical procedures of some kinds, though). If they were doing a study or something, I'd participate, of course. And I'd love to have the antibodies test, although I would be surprised if it turned out I'd had it.
  • lemurcat2
    lemurcat2 Posts: 7,881 Member
    edited June 2020
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    trying very hard to keep this non political......

    If testing costs money, especially if you are uninsured, then obviously your actual number of cases would be much higher than the official stats and this would be disproportionately more so in the most at risk poor communities.



    Here in South Australia, our official number of active cases is 0.

    I am confident that is accurate as anyone can get tested at no cost - and they are. Anyone who has the slightest little sniffle gets tested and is self isolated until results come back (usually next day, 2 days at most)

    Anyone here (IL) who thinks they have it can be tested for free. The antibody tests are different (and I haven't researched them), and the protests plus looting have set back the testing in general. The test seems unpleasant so I'm sure lots who might have it don't test, although they could, given how much the mild symptoms overlap other things.

    I dont think the test is that unpleasant.

    I havent had it but I have had respiratory nasal swabs in the past testing for influenza and whooping cough and it is basically the same test method.

    Lots of people have been tested here, including children, and I'm not getting feedback that the test was horrible.

    I agree - it is really not that bad. I had to have it done (work in a correctional setting that had massive outbreak) and made the mistake of watching some videos online about the test itself and reading others' experiences - it looked massive! I think some does come down to the person doing it, but mine was quick and not bad at all!

    Good to know. The videos and commentary (including in the link I put in my last post) I think have freaked out a lot of people about it.
  • lemurcat2
    lemurcat2 Posts: 7,881 Member
    So I just checked on the antibody tests -- looks like they are easy to get here, but I don't think a "I just want to find out if I had it already" without some other medical purpose would be covered by insurance, so I'd have to pay.
  • spiriteagle99
    spiriteagle99 Posts: 3,592 Member
    edited June 2020

    I think Labcorps is the ones that used to do our local hospital and medical practices. Once I got a $900 bill for some mostly routine bloodwork (thyroid, CBC, and Lyme). I was afraid to go back to the doctor the following year and decided I wasn't going to do any testing that wasn't essential. Later I learned from one of the nurses that my insurance company works with Health Network Labs and gets much lower prices through them.