Welcome to the new Community design. We know there are some big changes to get used to as well some challenges and bugs. Please check out our post about New Updates To The Community as well as Outstanding Bugs. We will continue to collect feedback and bug issues and will work to make improvements.

Coronavirus prep

1653654656658659682

Replies

  • lynn_glenmont
    lynn_glenmont Posts: 9,245 Member
    I find it disturbing when people make arguments that ignore the fact that some people face challenges that most people don't, or when they say X% have this or can do that, as though that means we should just ignore the 100-X% who don't have this or can't do that.

    Again, I don't think a lack of Internet access is in any meaningful way fueling vaccine hesitation or resistance. But one can make that argument about vaccine hesitation or resistance without making assertions that everybody has access to the Internet, or that it doesn't really matter that some people don't.
  • Theoldguy1
    Theoldguy1 Posts: 2,173 Member
    jenilla1 wrote: »
    SModa61 wrote: »
    jenilla1 wrote: »
    I personally know no one in my life who has died from covid.

    I have personal connections to two people who died from the covid vaccine.

    Please be respectful of this when pushing the vaccine or denigrating those who choose not to take it.

    The thing is, I don’t believe you, because so few people around the world have died following the vaccine that for a single person to know two of them is astronomically unlikely.

    Exactly!

    Not comfortable with calling each other liars here. We may have differing opinions, but I go in with the premise that, especially when people are making personal statements, they are telling the truth.

    Spokesperson for the CDC stated just a week ago, "To date, CDC has not detected any unusual or unexpected patterns for deaths following immunization that would indicate that COVID vaccines are causing or contributing to deaths, outside of the 3 confirmed deaths following the Janssen vaccine."

    For the poster to have known 2 of the 3 people who have died in the US from getting the vaccine seems like a stretch to me. I'm going to have to differ in opinion on this.

    The poster who is claiming they know 2 people who have died from the COVID vaccine may be relying on VAERS, which is notoriously bad. As in claiming someone who dies in an auto accident a day or two after getting a vaccine is a vaccine related death.

    Dying in an auto accident after getting a vaccine is tragic. But it’s not a result of the vaccine.

    Coming back to this comment because I just got home from an appointment with a naturopathic doctor. She asked if I have been vaccinated. When I said yes she was relieved because she has to work very hard to convince many of her patients that vaccines are OK.

    She’s up to date on the actual science, and is extremely frustrated with people who are refusing to get vaccinated.

    And if a kitten NATUROPATHIC doctor is saying the COVID vaccines are safe?
    Seriously. Game. Set. Match.
    Get your jab.

    Naturopaths spend their time telling their patients they don't need drugs. Not surprising their patients balk at taking drugs.
  • lynn_glenmont
    lynn_glenmont Posts: 9,245 Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    I find it disturbing when people make arguments that ignore the fact that some people face challenges that most people don't, or when they say X% have this or can do that, as though that means we should just ignore the 100-X% who don't have this or can't do that.

    Again, I don't think a lack of Internet access is in any meaningful way fueling vaccine hesitation or resistance. But one can make that argument about vaccine hesitation or resistance without making assertions that everybody has access to the Internet, or that it doesn't really matter that some people don't.

    No one has said everyone has had access to the internet.

    Most Americans here have said they had non internet access to info re side effects, which is the topic here. I don't believe anyone has established they couldn't get non internet access to such info, just maybe that some sites assumed people already had such info so provided it request only. The claim we are less "lucky" in that regard than people in the UK is not well sourced.

    The idea that Americans in general are disadvantaged in comparison to people in the UK in general re knowledge about potential side effects from the vax and thus are more vax hesitant makes NO SENSE.

    Re my city -- not saying anything about the issues where anyone else lives, they can identify issues -- it is known that people in poorer, less white areas are much more vax hesitant and also much more affected by C-19, so since we first had the vax the city has been making huge efforts to try to give people information and convince them to be vaxxed. It hasn't been as successful as one might want, but it has taken into account people not having internet access and has provided them with information. I've mentioned this repeatedly, so find it odd to be accused of claiming that everyone has internet access, etc. Cities know not everyone does and are reacting accordingly. (Mostly less internet access is an age thing, however, and older people seem to be less vax hesitant, although they also have received outreach.)

    And, similarly, I mentioned that my city's school district knew on line learning would be an issue since most of the district is low income, so made a huge effort to make iPads available to all. Despite that, a huge number of kids didn't show up for on line learning, which is why getting back to in person learning was more significant for poorer kids (although it was mostly parents of non poor kids who were furious about the schools being closed for as long as they were here, unlike the private and parochial schools and unlike in Europe), but still schools being closed clearly disproportionately hurt poorer kids, who were less likely to have parents who replaced the missed school with at home instruction (as most of my neighbors were able to do).

    Yes, early spring while my sister and I were on our computers clicking refresh repeatedly trying to get our mother an appointment, a hospital where she'd had a procedure recently reached out to her and booked her one.

    Again, anecdotes about how something worked for one person don't mean that it worked for everyone. Not everybody can.
  • SModa61
    SModa61 Posts: 1,889 Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    I find it disturbing when people make arguments that ignore the fact that some people face challenges that most people don't, or when they say X% have this or can do that, as though that means we should just ignore the 100-X% who don't have this or can't do that.

    Again, I don't think a lack of Internet access is in any meaningful way fueling vaccine hesitation or resistance. But one can make that argument about vaccine hesitation or resistance without making assertions that everybody has access to the Internet, or that it doesn't really matter that some people don't.

    No one has said everyone has had access to the internet.

    Most Americans here have said they had non internet access to info re side effects, which is the topic here. I don't believe anyone has established they couldn't get non internet access to such info, just maybe that some sites assumed people already had such info so provided it request only. The claim we are less "lucky" in that regard than people in the UK is not well sourced.

    The idea that Americans in general are disadvantaged in comparison to people in the UK in general re knowledge about potential side effects from the vax and thus are more vax hesitant makes NO SENSE.

    Re my city -- not saying anything about the issues where anyone else lives, they can identify issues -- it is known that people in poorer, less white areas are much more vax hesitant and also much more affected by C-19, so since we first had the vax the city has been making huge efforts to try to give people information and convince them to be vaxxed. It hasn't been as successful as one might want, but it has taken into account people not having internet access and has provided them with information. I've mentioned this repeatedly, so find it odd to be accused of claiming that everyone has internet access, etc. Cities know not everyone does and are reacting accordingly. (Mostly less internet access is an age thing, however, and older people seem to be less vax hesitant, although they also have received outreach.)

    And, similarly, I mentioned that my city's school district knew on line learning would be an issue since most of the district is low income, so made a huge effort to make iPads available to all. Despite that, a huge number of kids didn't show up for on line learning, which is why getting back to in person learning was more significant for poorer kids (although it was mostly parents of non poor kids who were furious about the schools being closed for as long as they were here, unlike the private and parochial schools and unlike in Europe), but still schools being closed clearly disproportionately hurt poorer kids, who were less likely to have parents who replaced the missed school with at home instruction (as most of my neighbors were able to do).

    Yes, early spring while my sister and I were on our computers clicking refresh repeatedly trying to get our mother an appointment, a hospital where she'd had a procedure recently reached out to her and booked her one.

    I actually had forgotten about certain aspects of the vaccine sign up until I read your post. Regarding the three 80+ family members I mentioned earlier, while yes they all wanted the shots, signing them up was awful. For my MIL, my son (software guy) had to write a monitoring software script that would sound an alert when an opening became available. Even with that, he missed the first two alerts. Took about 12 hours after the script was written to get her appointment. For my parents, it was all hands on deck (different states from MIL). Daughter actually landed the appointments for them. For DH and I, we signed up a back door way to land a slot.
  • Fuzzipeg
    Fuzzipeg Posts: 2,183 Member
    edited September 25
    My point was, not everyone has the funds to spare on the purchase of computers or smart phones, nor, probably less the connectivity they require. Others in the UK live in remote areas where there can be no connectivity or the connectivity is so poor that its is not worth considering. In an earlier part of my life computers and the like were financially unavailable to me, neither were they of any interest. I have a computer now because its been provided for me and that person does everything technical.

    I believe governments all too often miss the significance of ignoring those who have no access nor interest in technology, there are some. By providing definitive scientific information particularly relating to covid, in a form most persons can access, offering the same information in Brail, could go some way to undermine the malign influence of those who are cynical, particularly if it were delivered door to door, there have been occasions where this has happened. I realise there are persons who are poorly educated for many issues extending from multiple deprivations. Some are simply alienated by the concept of community, authority, government, it being better to work together rather than against one another and will never be reached, parts of society can be that dysfunctional, diametrically opposed to anything, fragmented.

    Here, (dare I say, uk, small letters because "others" on here are alien) When it was realised there were sections of our population who were hesitant, better known persons from those communities, actors, singers, leaders were more than happy to show they had been vaccinated and the whys and ins and outs of it all. Muslim leaders opened their mosques to support vaccination, explaining how having the vaccine in the day time would not violate Ramadan. Other religions also joined in the information sharing. I realise our vaccination numbers are not perfect but most of the issues are because the pattern of vaccination started with the elderly and descended by age groups leaving the young adults till the last, now older children are having vaccine too.

    edited to add- most of our medical practices were actively involved in providing vaccinations to their patients, setting up centres in their populations. We were called by our practice well before the general NHS availability tried to contact us by letter, gosh that is paper again............. Systems are different. I prefer to be invited rather than chase overbooked slots.