Coronavirus prep

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Replies

  • SModa61
    SModa61 Posts: 2,090 Member
    Ok, all. What counts as "middle age"? As I get older, that sounds more and more confusing. When do I cross out and classify as old? I am 60 now.

    I do think these definitions have changed over the decades.
  • snowflake954
    snowflake954 Posts: 7,496 Member
    My husband had to pick up horse feed at the tractor store yesterday and he commented that more shoppers were openly carrying firearms (six) than wearing masks (two, counting him.)

    Maybe they think they can shoot COVID?
  • kimny72
    kimny72 Posts: 16,027 Member
    edited March 22
    SModa61 wrote: »
    Ok, all. What counts as "middle age"? As I get older, that sounds more and more confusing. When do I cross out and classify as old? I am 60 now.

    I do think these definitions have changed over the decades.

    I don't know if there's a sciencey answer to that question, but I think it's typically used in this sort of classification as not a young adult but not a senior. Or sometimes with women I think it assumes the upper cutoff is menopausal. So in my head it's 30ish to 60ish. Which is probably not helpful to you :lol:

    ETA: Britannica says 40-60.
    And I found a 20 yr old research paper that defined the study groups as young adult (18-35), middle-aged(35-55), and older-adult (55+).

    ETAA: It's quite possible that long covid is more likely in women in general, but it "seems" more prevalent in middle age because young women are less likely to report symptoms or seek care, and older women were more likely to have a serious case, which makes the dividing line between "i had covid for 6 months" and "I had long covid after covid" fuzzier.
  • Fuzzipeg
    Fuzzipeg Posts: 2,244 Member
    Yesterday in the UK there was a report of someone with a severely compromised immune system who had covid for 7 months of continuous positive testing had been given a covid vaccine and was reported to be doing well and now clear. It seems the vaccine gave the person the ability to make the required t-cells and other required attributes to combat the Virus. I do not know at which stage of the pandemic this person was first taken ill, I would think before the vaccination was first made available.

    I follow the Epstein Bar idea aligned to long covid. In my view so very many of the symptoms of long covid appear on lists for autoimmune conditions too. Then many who recover have deficiencies in some vitamins and minerasl.

    Its sad so many are not wearing masks now. (I'm glad I don't live where more people openly carry arms) I reported we were not having our case numbers reported, I'm now thinking I had missed that weeks announcement. The numbers announced last weekend, our case numbers went up from 2000's into the 3000's up by over an actual 3rd, can't remember the actual number, that thought left me stunned. I'm in a local authority area where they say 1 in 20 of us have it!!! I fear I heard 1 in 14 have it in Scotland. But we are confidently told, the pandemic is over, I don't think those with severely compromised immune systems are likely to be so confident like the first person I mentioned.

    Carry on, do what you feel comfortable with. Take care and Keep safe.
  • SModa61
    SModa61 Posts: 2,090 Member
    @kimny72 Thanks for the insights. Yup, 60 and finished menopause in 2010, I guess I am that "older adult" that looks back in the mirror.

    @Fuzzipeg - Masks? I am guilty of currently not wearing them, but I am in the Florida keys. Lots of activity, and even dining, is outside. Our condo has a 24 ft slider on one wall with and adjoining 8 ft slider so we can be "outside" while "inside". Just looked at the Monroe Sounty cases, and last reporting of any cases was March 13th. When we head back to Massachusetts in May, odds are masks and such will be returning for me.
  • Fuzzipeg
    Fuzzipeg Posts: 2,244 Member
    SModa61, you sound to be in a lovely area. I know places are very different case rates vary so very much thankfully. I hope this summer can bring down our local cases though I'm not very hopeful, there are so many people who come to our area for days or week or more. I know covid not as bad as the first version but its sad the way we have to live with it now.

    Thinking architecture, I don't recognise the term "slider" might we call it/them sliding doors or full length sliding windows. Sounds wonderful to have so much light where one is staying. Have a very good stay.
  • SModa61
    SModa61 Posts: 2,090 Member
    Fuzzipeg wrote: »
    SModa61, you sound to be in a lovely area. I know places are very different case rates vary so very much thankfully. I hope this summer can bring down our local cases though I'm not very hopeful, there are so many people who come to our area for days or week or more. I know covid not as bad as the first version but its sad the way we have to live with it now.

    Thinking architecture, I don't recognise the term "slider" might we call it/them sliding doors or full length sliding windows. Sounds wonderful to have so much light where one is staying. Have a very good stay.

    Indeed, sliding glass door would be more correct. It does give meaning to the expression "living in glass houses". We are right on the very populated harbor, so I try and watch what I am wearing when in the living room/dining room/kitchen as the effect of the "invisible wall" (as it is also called) would be ruined by window treatments.

    Stay safe. Stay well!
  • rheddmobile
    rheddmobile Posts: 6,841 Member
    SModa61 wrote: »
    Fuzzipeg wrote: »
    SModa61, you sound to be in a lovely area. I know places are very different case rates vary so very much thankfully. I hope this summer can bring down our local cases though I'm not very hopeful, there are so many people who come to our area for days or week or more. I know covid not as bad as the first version but its sad the way we have to live with it now.

    Thinking architecture, I don't recognise the term "slider" might we call it/them sliding doors or full length sliding windows. Sounds wonderful to have so much light where one is staying. Have a very good stay.

    Indeed, sliding glass door would be more correct. It does give meaning to the expression "living in glass houses". We are right on the very populated harbor, so I try and watch what I am wearing when in the living room/dining room/kitchen as the effect of the "invisible wall" (as it is also called) would be ruined by window treatments.

    Stay safe. Stay well!

    The indoor/outdoor thing sounds delightful, but having visited Florida, I am picturing lizards on the dining room table!
  • Fuzzipeg
    Fuzzipeg Posts: 2,244 Member
    Thank you, both.
  • Theoldguy1
    Theoldguy1 Posts: 2,270 Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Is anyone else planning to continue (permanently, for now) anything you started doing during the pandemic, that you didn't do previously? I was thinking about this, this morning.

    I'll probably keep buying milk a few cartons at a time, instead of just one, and freezing them: I think it reduces grocery trip frequency, so reduces gas use a tiny bit, as well as requiring less time. Probably ditto for lemon/lime wedges I like in my morning iced matcha, which I can cut up then freeze rather than keeping a smaller number of the fresh fruits on hand.

    This is all "luxury trivia" of privilege, though. I admittedly - so far, fingers crossed - have a pretty pleasant, uncomplicated life, including (speaking relative to others) during the pandemic.

    It makes me wonder, though, if others have stumbled over convenient or happy life changes that are worth continuing.

    While I am open to 100% remote work or non-office work, I plan to never work in an office again.

    Sounds like most offices are wanting people back at least part time so looks like you won't be working in an office.
  • lynn_glenmont
    lynn_glenmont Posts: 9,431 Member
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Is anyone else planning to continue (permanently, for now) anything you started doing during the pandemic, that you didn't do previously? I was thinking about this, this morning.

    I'll probably keep buying milk a few cartons at a time, instead of just one, and freezing them: I think it reduces grocery trip frequency, so reduces gas use a tiny bit, as well as requiring less time. Probably ditto for lemon/lime wedges I like in my morning iced matcha, which I can cut up then freeze rather than keeping a smaller number of the fresh fruits on hand.

    This is all "luxury trivia" of privilege, though. I admittedly - so far, fingers crossed - have a pretty pleasant, uncomplicated life, including (speaking relative to others) during the pandemic.

    It makes me wonder, though, if others have stumbled over convenient or happy life changes that are worth continuing.

    While I am open to 100% remote work or non-office work, I plan to never work in an office again.

    Sounds like most offices are wanting people back at least part time so looks like you won't be working in an office.

    A business can "want" something, but it doesn't mean it's going to get it. Most business would likely be happy to have all their employees work for free. Not likely they'll get it.
  • Theoldguy1
    Theoldguy1 Posts: 2,270 Member
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Is anyone else planning to continue (permanently, for now) anything you started doing during the pandemic, that you didn't do previously? I was thinking about this, this morning.

    I'll probably keep buying milk a few cartons at a time, instead of just one, and freezing them: I think it reduces grocery trip frequency, so reduces gas use a tiny bit, as well as requiring less time. Probably ditto for lemon/lime wedges I like in my morning iced matcha, which I can cut up then freeze rather than keeping a smaller number of the fresh fruits on hand.

    This is all "luxury trivia" of privilege, though. I admittedly - so far, fingers crossed - have a pretty pleasant, uncomplicated life, including (speaking relative to others) during the pandemic.

    It makes me wonder, though, if others have stumbled over convenient or happy life changes that are worth continuing.

    While I am open to 100% remote work or non-office work, I plan to never work in an office again.

    Sounds like most offices are wanting people back at least part time so looks like you won't be working in an office.

    A business can "want" something, but it doesn't mean it's going to get it. Most business would likely be happy to have all their employees work for free. Not likely they'll get it.

    People that want good jobs will go back if that is what the employer requires.
  • ReenieHJ
    ReenieHJ Posts: 9,511 Member
    am I a lone wolf? I like being back in the office. I only stay remote when Covid is spiking. When I saw it dropping again I went back in mid Feb. If it spikes up again I will go remote. The flexibility is important to me. Of course I have a very short commute also.

    Commute may be part of the reason why you like it. :) Plus it can be a social time as well as work.
    I have 2 dds, 1 of them has a job that'd be truly difficult doing remotely. The other dd wishes she could work remotely more because she finds it less distracting than being in her office. And they both live an hour away from their job. That's a lot of your whole day taken up by driving alone.