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What are your unpopular opinions about health / fitness?

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Replies

  • TonyB0588
    TonyB0588 Posts: 9,520 Member
    TonyB0588 wrote: »
    Dessert after meals is unnecessary and does nothing good for your health.

    What if my dessert is fruit, natural yoghurt, protein powder, nuts and fits my calories and macros? Maybe not necessary, but probably contributing to micronutrients/vitamins/minerals I'd otherwise not get.

    Mental health is also important - if a small treat after dinner makes me feel good, happy, satisfied etc, is that a bad thing?

    Maybe not a bad thing, but it's still my unpopular opinion anyway. Life has become too complicated. Eating has become too complicated. A simple one course meal without the extra frills was okay until people started getting creative.
  • livingleanlivingclean
    livingleanlivingclean Posts: 11,755 Member
    Hey, could we rewind here? Salad? Does it seriously actually have a significant difference in meaning across the pond, or was that mostly a humorous remark?

    No, not humorous...
    Salad in the US seems to often be a mush of stuff with a creamy dressing. Eg "chicken salad", "egg salad".
  • TonyB0588
    TonyB0588 Posts: 9,520 Member
    Hey, could we rewind here? Salad? Does it seriously actually have a significant difference in meaning across the pond, or was that mostly a humorous remark?

    No, not humorous...
    Salad in the US seems to often be a mush of stuff with a creamy dressing. Eg "chicken salad", "egg salad".

    Salad is one of my "pet peeves". My grandparents ate "greens", but the more refined people called them vegetables. Then it started to be that people mixed up different vegetables together and called it salad. Next we started to add oil, and cheese, and bacon, and raisins, and apples, and ..........

    I guess you see my point, even if it's just an unpopular opinion.
  • livingleanlivingclean
    livingleanlivingclean Posts: 11,755 Member
    TonyB0588 wrote: »
    Hey, could we rewind here? Salad? Does it seriously actually have a significant difference in meaning across the pond, or was that mostly a humorous remark?

    No, not humorous...
    Salad in the US seems to often be a mush of stuff with a creamy dressing. Eg "chicken salad", "egg salad".

    Salad is one of my "pet peeves". My grandparents ate "greens", but the more refined people called them vegetables. Then it started to be that people mixed up different vegetables together and called it salad. Next we started to add oil, and cheese, and bacon, and raisins, and apples, and ..........

    I guess you see my point, even if it's just an unpopular opinion.

    There is nothing wrong with mixing foods together to create flavour combinations. Food doesn't have to be bland and boring. Food is more than just fuel.

    My issue with the salad word is that the US use doesn't describe what I'd call a salad.
  • WakkoW
    WakkoW Posts: 567 Member
    TonyB0588 wrote: »
    Hey, could we rewind here? Salad? Does it seriously actually have a significant difference in meaning across the pond, or was that mostly a humorous remark?

    No, not humorous...
    Salad in the US seems to often be a mush of stuff with a creamy dressing. Eg "chicken salad", "egg salad".

    Salad is one of my "pet peeves". My grandparents ate "greens", but the more refined people called them vegetables. Then it started to be that people mixed up different vegetables together and called it salad. Next we started to add oil, and cheese, and bacon, and raisins, and apples, and ..........

    I guess you see my point, even if it's just an unpopular opinion.

    There is nothing wrong with mixing foods together to create flavour combinations. Food doesn't have to be bland and boring. Food is more than just fuel.

    My issue with the salad word is that the US use doesn't describe what I'd call a salad.

    Have you ever been to the US? We have chicken and egg salad sandwiches, but when i think of a salad its greens (some sort of lettuce) with vegetables not sandwiches. Most all restaurants offer a salad made with made with lettuce usually called a side salad. But really, a salad can have anything included.

    https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/salad
  • VintageFeline
    VintageFeline Posts: 6,771 Member
    Ah, and to me, a Swiss roll is only a Swiss roll if the cake is chocolate, the inner frosting is white and, if there's anything on the outside of the cake, it'd be a thin layer of chocolate frosting, though leaving it plain is ok too.

    That would be a chocolate log herenin the UK, especially popular at Christmas where the frosting is made to look like tree bark.

    A Swiss roll is the above without outer frosting.

    We call subs subs but like Australia pretty much only if from subway.

    Thinking I call a drinking fountain a water fountain but we don't have many of them.

    Jam donuts.

    And probably fizzy juice but again I don't have need to say it much other than stating I don't really drink it!
  • VintageFeline
    VintageFeline Posts: 6,771 Member
    Oh salad. Doesn't the US call some weird dessert type things salads? The only time we use it in that context is if it's a variety of chopped fresh fruit (though you can also get a tinned version often used in trifle).

    The only savoury salad outside of something lettuce based is I think potato salad, potatoes with mayo. Egg salad is egg mayonnaise. We're generally pretty litter all!

    But there are also a million regional variations of some things. I'm the north they'd call soda pop. Rolls are all sorts, baps, cobs, rolls. In Scotland a crusty roll is called a morning roll.

    Also yes on the jam rolly polly. Except I think that would generally be in reference to the frozen needs to be defrosted cake of my childhood dreams.
  • Strawblackcat
    Strawblackcat Posts: 944 Member
    Oh salad. Doesn't the US call some weird dessert type things salads? The only time we use it in that context is if it's a variety of chopped fresh fruit (though you can also get a tinned version often used in trifle).

    The only savoury salad outside of something lettuce based is I think potato salad, potatoes with mayo. Egg salad is egg mayonnaise. We're generally pretty litter all!

    But there are also a million regional variations of some things. I'm the north they'd call soda pop. Rolls are all sorts, baps, cobs, rolls. In Scotland a crusty roll is called a morning roll.

    Also yes on the jam rolly polly. Except I think that would generally be in reference to the frozen needs to be defrosted cake of my childhood dreams.

    There's gelatin salads, which are normally an abomination of Jello, Cool Whip, fruit, and pretzels ocassionally. I once was forced into attending a church social where there was a different Jello "salad" for every color of the rainbow, plus a couple of one's featuring sugar-free Jello, because every 4th person at this church had diabetes.

    To me, salads are bowls of raw greens topped with other vegetables. Fruit, meat, nuts, cheese, and dressjng. To the rest of the country, they're pretty much anything that consists of chilled foods that are mixed together and compared in a dressing.
  • livingleanlivingclean
    livingleanlivingclean Posts: 11,755 Member
    edited August 2017
    WakkoW wrote: »
    TonyB0588 wrote: »
    Hey, could we rewind here? Salad? Does it seriously actually have a significant difference in meaning across the pond, or was that mostly a humorous remark?

    No, not humorous...
    Salad in the US seems to often be a mush of stuff with a creamy dressing. Eg "chicken salad", "egg salad".

    Salad is one of my "pet peeves". My grandparents ate "greens", but the more refined people called them vegetables. Then it started to be that people mixed up different vegetables together and called it salad. Next we started to add oil, and cheese, and bacon, and raisins, and apples, and ..........

    I guess you see my point, even if it's just an unpopular opinion.

    There is nothing wrong with mixing foods together to create flavour combinations. Food doesn't have to be bland and boring. Food is more than just fuel.

    My issue with the salad word is that the US use doesn't describe what I'd call a salad.

    Have you ever been to the US? We have chicken and egg salad sandwiches, but when i think of a salad its greens (some sort of lettuce) with vegetables not sandwiches. Most all restaurants offer a salad made with made with lettuce usually called a side salad. But really, a salad can have anything included.

    https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/salad

    Yes... Twice. What you call chicken salad and egg salad (and any other similar "salad") is not salad. Imo. If you asked for chicken salad in Australia, you'd get a salad (leaves, vegies, dressing etc) with chicken.
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    edited August 2017
    Just "salad" in the US is usually lettuce or some other kind of uncooked greens as a base with various other vegetables on it, typically some kind of dressing, and maybe some other ingredients, but the greens are the base.

    There are other kinds of salad, but they are always preceded with a modifier to distinguish them: egg salad, potato salad, fruit salad, chicken salad, cucumber salad (regular salad often has cucumbers, though), so on.

    I'd actually forgotten jello salad was a thing, seems very '70s to me, although I recall having it still in the '80s. If someone was expecting a "salad" and got that, they'd be shocked, though.

    I really don't get "My grandparents ate "greens", but the more refined people called them vegetables. Then it started to be that people mixed up different vegetables together and called it salad. Next we started to add oil, and cheese, and bacon, and raisins, and apples, and .........."

    In my version of English, greens is a generic term for leaf based vegetables like spinach, kale, chard, collards, dandelion, turnip greens, arugula, endive, etc. (and I'd weirdly include leafy things that are not green, like radicchio).

    Vegetables are, well, vegetables, culinary use, not botanical. As a side dish, however, potatoes and corn are not vegetables even though they technically are, they are starches (or such is how I remember it from growing up). Classic American dinner I grew up with would have meat, starch (often potatoes or corn or bread), and vegetable (often canned). Salad could be the vegetable, but more often it was a starter or extra side with a more elaborate dinner. Jello could be the dessert. It was never considered a vegetable.

    Adding oil and vinegar and cheese and bacon and so on to a salad is not a new fangled thing, it's just a more elaborate thing (well, except for the dressing, commonly oil and vinegar, which any salad would normally have, but not other vegetable dishes, some which might involve multiple vegetables). More formal/fancy salads would have more extras -- think of Julia Child showing how to cook a salad nicoise or, of course, a classic caesar salad. Of course, we wouldn't have those at home when I was a kid -- we had romaine or spinach or iceberg plus cucumbers, carrots, celery, tomatoes, stuff like that.
  • earlnabby
    earlnabby Posts: 8,177 Member
    I was surprised when I went to Nepal and there was a bowl of "pickle". To me, "pickle" means a cucumber of some type packed in a brine. They can be whole of any size or sliced; the brine can be sweet or not; contain garlic, chili peppers, dill, mustard seed, celery seed, etc.; or just vinegar and salt. If it is a vegetable that is not a cucumber but is packed in a brine, it is a "pickled beet" (or green bean, Brussels sprout, mushroom, onion, etc). What I was served was shredded vegetables in vinegar which, around here, would be called a salad.
  • HeliumIsNoble
    HeliumIsNoble Posts: 1,222 Member
    edited August 2017
    We got meat salad in Germany.
    Ah yes!
    That used to feature in trick questions on German tests at school level. Fun for all the class there.
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    edited August 2017
    JerSchmare wrote: »
    The fact that people say the exercise calorie database is way off. Like, what? I've been following for well over 5 years, probably 8 or so, no it's always spot on.

    Depends on the exercise and the person.

    Many exercises that vary a lot based on how hard/fast you are doing them get perceived as higher intensity by newbies to exercise or people way out of shape, and those are the ones that tend to be off.

    Running x miles in y minutes at whatever one's weight is, pretty easy to estimate accurately, although the slower and longer you run (or walk) the more off the number is due to not subtracting the calories you would burn anyway during the same time. But other things, like swimming (MFP asks intensity, not speed or distance), zumba or other exercise classes, circuit training (depends a lot on what you do), elliptical, rowing (again, if based just on time, not distance), so on can be way off.

    Other common issues I've seen from newbies include logging stationary biking as if it were outdoor biking (the calories tend to be less, often significantly less), again focusing on perceived intensity, not actual speed and resistence, and counting total time at gym vs. specific activities (newbie burning 1000 calories for 90 minutes at the gym "circuit training" or some such, when a lot of that was down time or activities that don't burn much).
  • cmriverside
    cmriverside Posts: 32,793 Member
    Is it a jelly roll, a jelly doughnut, or a Bismark?
    Do you drink from a drinking fountain, a water fountain, or a bubbler?
    Do you eat subs, hoagies, or grinders?
    Of course, there is the ultimate: soda or pop? (or Coke, or tonic)


    ...and this is why humans will never be able to communicate whatsoever.

    Bismarks are those chocolate covered donuts with pudding inside. It's my favorite.

    dd21RS.jpg
    1. Water fountain
    2. Sub
    3. Coke

    I can't even cite regional differences. I've lived in PA, FL, CA, WA. Not sure when or where I came up with these beliefs. It's my feels.

This discussion has been closed.