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Thoughts on the “glamourizing/normalizing” obesity vs body positivity conversations

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  • CSARdiverCSARdiver Member Posts: 6,279 Member Member Posts: 6,279 Member
    The diet industry is pretty big, multibillion-dollar. I've never seen ads for products that promise to make you fat, there are thousands of products and services promising to make people skinny. If society really was glamorizing obesity, everybody would want to become obese like the glamourous people.

    This is the plot of the movie - Branded (2012).

    Horrible movie, but an interesting premise on the power of marketing.
  • Theoldguy1Theoldguy1 Member Posts: 1,005 Member Member Posts: 1,005 Member
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    I don't think it's a moral and upstanding thing to make obese people feel bad about themselves. The idea that making people uncomfortable will improve their lives in the long run ... like fat shaming makes you a superhero ... it's pretty sanctimonious.

    Other people's choices are their business and responsibility.

    Will you be saying that when/if we have socialized healthcare in the US and you have to pay (even to a greater extent than you do now) for other people's bad choices?

    How is this even a question? Does money give you a right to lord things over people? Auto insurance isn't socialized but it's pooled, everyone who has the same insurer as you can affect your rates with big claims, do you lecture strangers for speeding? No, because it's not about the money (that's an excuse) it's about the fat people.

    But as someone who hasn't had any accidents and just a couple speeding tickets in 40+ years of driving, my rates are considerably lower than someone with multiple accidents and reckless driving tickets. So even though the risk is pooled, the person causing the increased cost pays more.
  • NorthCascadesNorthCascades Member Posts: 9,783 Member Member Posts: 9,783 Member
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    I don't think it's a moral and upstanding thing to make obese people feel bad about themselves. The idea that making people uncomfortable will improve their lives in the long run ... like fat shaming makes you a superhero ... it's pretty sanctimonious.

    Other people's choices are their business and responsibility.

    Will you be saying that when/if we have socialized healthcare in the US and you have to pay (even to a greater extent than you do now) for other people's bad choices?

    How is this even a question? Does money give you a right to lord things over people? Auto insurance isn't socialized but it's pooled, everyone who has the same insurer as you can affect your rates with big claims, do you lecture strangers for speeding? No, because it's not about the money (that's an excuse) it's about the fat people.

    But as someone who hasn't had any accidents and just a couple speeding tickets in 40+ years of driving, my rates are considerably lower than someone with multiple accidents and reckless driving tickets. So even though the risk is pooled, the person causing the increased cost pays more.

    That's true with medical insurance too. And if you're not obese you probably enjoy better health, lower risk if many types of illness, and better treatment by society.
  • mbaker566mbaker566 Member Posts: 10,979 Member Member Posts: 10,979 Member
    the only thing that affects our insurance rate with my work is smoking. not weight. i've not had insurance where i was punished for being overweight
  • Theoldguy1Theoldguy1 Member Posts: 1,005 Member Member Posts: 1,005 Member
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    I don't think it's a moral and upstanding thing to make obese people feel bad about themselves. The idea that making people uncomfortable will improve their lives in the long run ... like fat shaming makes you a superhero ... it's pretty sanctimonious.

    Other people's choices are their business and responsibility.

    Will you be saying that when/if we have socialized healthcare in the US and you have to pay (even to a greater extent than you do now) for other people's bad choices?

    How is this even a question? Does money give you a right to lord things over people? Auto insurance isn't socialized but it's pooled, everyone who has the same insurer as you can affect your rates with big claims, do you lecture strangers for speeding? No, because it's not about the money (that's an excuse) it's about the fat people.

    But as someone who hasn't had any accidents and just a couple speeding tickets in 40+ years of driving, my rates are considerably lower than someone with multiple accidents and reckless driving tickets. So even though the risk is pooled, the person causing the increased cost pays more.

    Doesn't a person with a higher BMI pay more as well?

    In some cases, most not
  • MikePTYMikePTY Member, Premium Posts: 3,823 Member Member, Premium Posts: 3,823 Member
    In the US, you don't pay higher health insurance premiums based on BMI, or any other health condition. The only things that affect health insurance premiums is age and if you are a smoker.
  • Theoldguy1Theoldguy1 Member Posts: 1,005 Member Member Posts: 1,005 Member
    MikePTY wrote: »
    In the US, you don't pay higher health insurance premiums based on BMI, or any other health condition. The only things that affect health insurance premiums is age and if you are a smoker.

    In some cases there is a penalty associated with high BMI. Check your policy.
  • MikePTYMikePTY Member, Premium Posts: 3,823 Member Member, Premium Posts: 3,823 Member
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    MikePTY wrote: »
    In the US, you don't pay higher health insurance premiums based on BMI, or any other health condition. The only things that affect health insurance premiums is age and if you are a smoker.

    In some cases there is a penalty associated with high BMI. Check your policy.

    It depends how you get your insurance. If you get it through the individual marketplace exchanges, insurers can't charge you more for your BMI or obesity. If you get it through an employer, your employer can raise your employee contribution portion for not meeting certain "wellness goals", which isn't as cut and dry as charging someone more for having a higher BMI. But there are certain circumstances where BMI could play a factor in that.
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