Recomposition: Maintaining weight while losing fat

13132343637126

Replies

  • auddii
    auddii Posts: 15,359 Member
    jimmmer wrote: »
    terar21 wrote: »
    terar21 wrote: »
    heybales wrote: »
    When I'm logging my calories I have a goal of 2060 calories for maintenance as a 142 lb, 5'9, 19 y/o male. I do NOT, however, log my lifting or running calories. Is it better for me to continue doing this as a recomp or try and log my lost calories as best I can? Any help would be appreciated.

    Well, a recomp means eating at maintenance - eating what you burn in other words to not lose weight.

    If you are NOT accounting for calories burned doing exercise - then are you really eating at maintenance, or in a deficit?

    My only concern is that the calories burned may not be correct and with an extended amount of time, any excess eaten calories would catch up with me. I am not able to effectively weigh myself on a regular basis and can go months without seeing a scale. If I'm trying to recomp, I would imagine it would be safer to eat in a deficit while being as close to maintenance as possible rather than have an excess of calories, correct?

    You'll notice it long before it would catch up with you. Even without a scale (do you do that on purpose or is there something restricting you from access to a scale), you can pay close attention to your body's appearance, how your clothes fit you, etc.

    You really can't worry about small variables in exercise burn. It's all a variable. Even what you're doing right now is only an estimate because your body's daily burn (minus the exercise) and is affected by how much general activity you get throughout the day. It's not the same daily. You'll drive yourself crazy worrying about that.

    Account for the exercise and eat at maintenance. Some days you'll be lower. Some days you'll be higher.

    Even trying to being in a deficit and getting as close to maintenance as possible is still having to account for exercise calories...just at a different number. So why not account for them at maintenance?

    It is due to a sort of restriction. Regardless, would the outcome of me wanting to lose body fat while gaining tone and definition change regardless of the method used?

    Not if your goal is building muscle, IMO. If your goal is potentially a little weight loss, then yes.

    Personally, my goal for this recomp is capitalizing on what little muscle I can and increasing strength. So I prefer to be a little over in my maintenance calories. I'd prefer not to have passive 200 calorie deficit days. It's safer for me to be slightly over if anything. The worst that could happen is 8 weeks down the line, I realize I've gained a single pound, that I can lose in a couple weeks without making any major adjustments. Or embrace the pound because...it's a pound. As long as the clothes feel right and the measurements match up, I'm good. And for me, any time I've seen jumps in the scale it's just my sodium level or some muscles retaining water after a really tough workout.

    But it's up to you really. If you'd like to exclude your exercise calories for safety purposes, you can. You'll just not be in recomp...rather still cutting. You'll indeed be losing body fat, but that's it. And I doubt you want to be in a perpetual cut. At some point you have to accept the exercise calories as something you must consume.

    However, I do agree with the poster that says you might be holding onto an irrational fear. I think it's normal. It took me a second to be relaxed about maintenance. You just have to realize that if you're doing the right thing, you just don't pick up extra pounds over night.

    This is so much on the money.

    Where's the like button for the forums?
    It's on the to do list, right behind the ignore feature... :wink:
  • heybales
    heybales Posts: 18,830 Member
    senecarr wrote: »
    Oh dear, people please flag and report.
    Edit: OK, it is gone now. Thanks.

    Wow, talk about curious now what I missed. Oh well, I'll live.
  • heybales
    heybales Posts: 18,830 Member
    dmt4641 wrote: »
    KrunchyMama - I found my fitbit over estimated my calories by at least 200 calories even though I run around after young kids and do things like weight lifting that it couldn't account for. When I went with TDEE and a small deficit I started losing. You aren't going to gain the amount of muscle necessary to throw off your BMI number through an active lifestyle. That is more of an issue for body builders or elite athletes. Even with a calories surplus and heavy weight lifting, you would be lucky to gain 10 lbs of muscle in a year. I have been lifting heavy weights for a year and half and I'm not where near gaining that much muscle.

    Yes, I've noticed the next day that my fitbit retracts about 500 calories. I always go back to check and adjust my calories accordingly for the day ahead. Kind of a pita to do, I wish it worked based on what I had already burned, not what I'm projected to burn for the rest of the day. I added a few pics to my profile to show the beginning steps of my recomp (the difference between me at 170.6 versus 169.8). It's not much, but I can feel/see it :)

    That's MFP and your selection of Activity Level - not Fitbit. Fitbit merely reports total daily burn - MFP does the math with it.

    If you selected Sedentary, and your last Fitbit sync was 9 pm when you went to bed, at that point MFP takes the last 3 hrs of the day assumed to be Sedentary level burn and adds it to whatever Fitbit said you burned up to that point.

    Well - 3 hrs of sleep is actually BMR level burn, not Sedentary. Of which MFP is informed the next morning upon first sync of Fitbit data.

    The effect is made worse by having an activity level that is higher, and/or going to bed earlier.

    But in either case - the amount of adjustment is always going to be about the same if you go to bed with last sync at the same time daily.
    Just leave that much in the green at last meal feeding, knowing the adjustment will go down - not that bad really, especially with even number like 500.
  • psuLemon
    psuLemon Posts: 38,021 MFP Moderator
    edited July 2015
    terar21 wrote: »
    terar21 wrote: »
    heybales wrote: »
    When I'm logging my calories I have a goal of 2060 calories for maintenance as a 142 lb, 5'9, 19 y/o male. I do NOT, however, log my lifting or running calories. Is it better for me to continue doing this as a recomp or try and log my lost calories as best I can? Any help would be appreciated.

    Well, a recomp means eating at maintenance - eating what you burn in other words to not lose weight.

    If you are NOT accounting for calories burned doing exercise - then are you really eating at maintenance, or in a deficit?

    My only concern is that the calories burned may not be correct and with an extended amount of time, any excess eaten calories would catch up with me. I am not able to effectively weigh myself on a regular basis and can go months without seeing a scale. If I'm trying to recomp, I would imagine it would be safer to eat in a deficit while being as close to maintenance as possible rather than have an excess of calories, correct?

    You'll notice it long before it would catch up with you. Even without a scale (do you do that on purpose or is there something restricting you from access to a scale), you can pay close attention to your body's appearance, how your clothes fit you, etc.

    You really can't worry about small variables in exercise burn. It's all a variable. Even what you're doing right now is only an estimate because your body's daily burn (minus the exercise) and is affected by how much general activity you get throughout the day. It's not the same daily. You'll drive yourself crazy worrying about that.

    Account for the exercise and eat at maintenance. Some days you'll be lower. Some days you'll be higher.

    Even trying to being in a deficit and getting as close to maintenance as possible is still having to account for exercise calories...just at a different number. So why not account for them at maintenance?

    It is due to a sort of restriction. Regardless, would the outcome of me wanting to lose body fat while gaining tone and definition change regardless of the method used?

    Not if your goal is building muscle, IMO. If your goal is potentially a little weight loss, then yes.

    Personally, my goal for this recomp is capitalizing on what little muscle I can and increasing strength. So I prefer to be a little over in my maintenance calories. I'd prefer not to have passive 200 calorie deficit days. It's safer for me to be slightly over if anything. The worst that could happen is 8 weeks down the line, I realize I've gained a single pound, that I can lose in a couple weeks without making any major adjustments. Or embrace the pound because...it's a pound. As long as the clothes feel right and the measurements match up, I'm good. And for me, any time I've seen jumps in the scale it's just my sodium level or some muscles retaining water after a really tough workout.

    But it's up to you really. If you'd like to exclude your exercise calories for safety purposes, you can. You'll just not be in recomp...rather still cutting. You'll indeed be losing body fat, but that's it. And I doubt you want to be in a perpetual cut. At some point you have to accept the exercise calories as something you must consume.

    However, I do agree with the poster that says you might be holding onto an irrational fear. I think it's normal. It took me a second to be relaxed about maintenance. You just have to realize that if you're doing the right thing, you just don't pick up extra pounds over night.


    I would like to add, one thing that has helped me and/or others that I know is to alter your goals. Having goals based on performance, rather than weight, may help get over some irrational fears. I have a spreadsheet on my computer with all my lifts (move, weights/reps) and at the end of the program, I can conduct trend analysis or understand percentage of strength gains. Additionally, I try to take pictures (although that has been awhile) but this will allow me to see if there are any gains/progress in my composition. Because honestly, I rather be 170 with a six pack than 160 and flabby. At this point, weight is fairly meaningless to me (being a normal weight) and body composition has hit the top of my list, along with progress in performance; this also includes performance related to my other workouts (HIIT and yoga). And in both of those categories, i have seen some of my best performance over the past few months (probably due to the increase in calories and more specifically an increase in carbs).

    To touch on a previous question regarding if anything has changed as I got older. For me, I have noticed I am a lot more focused on a few things: I don't compare myself to others anymore and I am more focused on overall fitness which includes a lot more flexibility training and core training. Since I have had sciatic and plantars fasciitus issues in the past, my goal is to ensure they don't come back. So instead of just focusing in lifting and HIIT, i incorporate flexibility training and use a foam roller more often.
  • J72FIT
    J72FIT Posts: 5,930 Member
    psulemon wrote: »
    I would like to add, one thing that has helped me and/or others that I know is to alter your goals. Having goals based on performance, rather than weight, may help get over some irrational fears. I have a spreadsheet on my computer with all my lifts (move, weights/reps) and at the end of the program, I can conduct trend analysis or understand percentage of strength gains. Additionally, I try to take pictures (although that has been awhile) but this will allow me to see if there are any gains/progress in my composition. Because honestly, I rather be 170 with a six pack than 160 and flabby. At this point, weight is fairly meaningless to me (being a normal weight) and body composition has hit the top of my list, along with progress in performance; this also includes performance related to my other workouts (HIIT and yoga). And in both of those categories, i have seen some of my best performance over the past few months (probably due to the increase in calories and more specifically an increase in carbs).

    To touch on a previous question regarding if anything has changed as I got older. For me, I have noticed I am a lot more focused on a few things: I don't compare myself to others anymore and I am more focused on overall fitness which includes a lot more flexibility training and core training. Since I have had sciatic and plantars fasciitus issues in the past, my goal is to ensure they don't come back. So instead of just focusing in lifting and HIIT, i not incorporate flexibility training and use a foam roller more often.
    The bolded sections can not be stressed enough!
    +1

  • scrittrice
    scrittrice Posts: 345 Member
    My question is, if I am building my muscle because I'm eating closer to maintenance (and I know I'm getting stronger, I can feel the difference in the amount of topsoil I can haul around with the wheelbarrow), and my clothes are getting smaller (on the cusp of transition between a size 12 to 11), then how do I know when I'm into the 'normal' range for my size? My brain tricks me often, some days I see my old self, and some days I see myself as smaller than I actually am (which was a huge problem when I was 195 lbs. In my mind I thought I looked closer to someone who was 160 lbs). I'd ask my husband, but he's no help lol. So how will I know? Either way I'm loving my new lifestyle, I feel great, I can see a huge difference in my strength, my endurance, and my flexibility. My fat hangs off my body, so I can see all these weird ripple indents on my skin, and I can pull it away from my body. I'm down over 20", although my arm measurements aren't changing much because of my new bat wings hanging down lol. Any insight would be appreciated :)

    The idea that BMI is an inaccurate measure is way overblown among the general population. Yes, if you are a bodybuilder with low body fat, you will be off the BMI charts, but for most of us mere mortals, it's not that much of an issue. Have you tried estimating your body fat by looking at one of those photographic guides? Also, I, too, have trouble seeing myself accurately (and had no idea how big I'd gotten). Monthly photos (same angle/position/clothing) are very useful. But mostly, if you're feeling good and you're happy with the way your clothes fit, I'd say to keep doing what you're doing. You don't really say what your goals are in your post, so it's hard to know.
  • terar21
    terar21 Posts: 523 Member
    jimmmer wrote: »
    terar21 wrote: »
    terar21 wrote: »
    heybales wrote: »
    When I'm logging my calories I have a goal of 2060 calories for maintenance as a 142 lb, 5'9, 19 y/o male. I do NOT, however, log my lifting or running calories. Is it better for me to continue doing this as a recomp or try and log my lost calories as best I can? Any help would be appreciated.

    Well, a recomp means eating at maintenance - eating what you burn in other words to not lose weight.

    If you are NOT accounting for calories burned doing exercise - then are you really eating at maintenance, or in a deficit?

    My only concern is that the calories burned may not be correct and with an extended amount of time, any excess eaten calories would catch up with me. I am not able to effectively weigh myself on a regular basis and can go months without seeing a scale. If I'm trying to recomp, I would imagine it would be safer to eat in a deficit while being as close to maintenance as possible rather than have an excess of calories, correct?

    You'll notice it long before it would catch up with you. Even without a scale (do you do that on purpose or is there something restricting you from access to a scale), you can pay close attention to your body's appearance, how your clothes fit you, etc.

    You really can't worry about small variables in exercise burn. It's all a variable. Even what you're doing right now is only an estimate because your body's daily burn (minus the exercise) and is affected by how much general activity you get throughout the day. It's not the same daily. You'll drive yourself crazy worrying about that.

    Account for the exercise and eat at maintenance. Some days you'll be lower. Some days you'll be higher.

    Even trying to being in a deficit and getting as close to maintenance as possible is still having to account for exercise calories...just at a different number. So why not account for them at maintenance?

    It is due to a sort of restriction. Regardless, would the outcome of me wanting to lose body fat while gaining tone and definition change regardless of the method used?

    Not if your goal is building muscle, IMO. If your goal is potentially a little weight loss, then yes.

    Personally, my goal for this recomp is capitalizing on what little muscle I can and increasing strength. So I prefer to be a little over in my maintenance calories. I'd prefer not to have passive 200 calorie deficit days. It's safer for me to be slightly over if anything. The worst that could happen is 8 weeks down the line, I realize I've gained a single pound, that I can lose in a couple weeks without making any major adjustments. Or embrace the pound because...it's a pound. As long as the clothes feel right and the measurements match up, I'm good. And for me, any time I've seen jumps in the scale it's just my sodium level or some muscles retaining water after a really tough workout.

    But it's up to you really. If you'd like to exclude your exercise calories for safety purposes, you can. You'll just not be in recomp...rather still cutting. You'll indeed be losing body fat, but that's it. And I doubt you want to be in a perpetual cut. At some point you have to accept the exercise calories as something you must consume.

    However, I do agree with the poster that says you might be holding onto an irrational fear. I think it's normal. It took me a second to be relaxed about maintenance. You just have to realize that if you're doing the right thing, you just don't pick up extra pounds over night.

    This is so much on the money.

    Where's the like button for the forums?

    :)
  • terar21
    terar21 Posts: 523 Member
    psulemon wrote: »
    terar21 wrote: »
    terar21 wrote: »
    heybales wrote: »
    When I'm logging my calories I have a goal of 2060 calories for maintenance as a 142 lb, 5'9, 19 y/o male. I do NOT, however, log my lifting or running calories. Is it better for me to continue doing this as a recomp or try and log my lost calories as best I can? Any help would be appreciated.

    Well, a recomp means eating at maintenance - eating what you burn in other words to not lose weight.

    If you are NOT accounting for calories burned doing exercise - then are you really eating at maintenance, or in a deficit?

    My only concern is that the calories burned may not be correct and with an extended amount of time, any excess eaten calories would catch up with me. I am not able to effectively weigh myself on a regular basis and can go months without seeing a scale. If I'm trying to recomp, I would imagine it would be safer to eat in a deficit while being as close to maintenance as possible rather than have an excess of calories, correct?

    You'll notice it long before it would catch up with you. Even without a scale (do you do that on purpose or is there something restricting you from access to a scale), you can pay close attention to your body's appearance, how your clothes fit you, etc.

    You really can't worry about small variables in exercise burn. It's all a variable. Even what you're doing right now is only an estimate because your body's daily burn (minus the exercise) and is affected by how much general activity you get throughout the day. It's not the same daily. You'll drive yourself crazy worrying about that.

    Account for the exercise and eat at maintenance. Some days you'll be lower. Some days you'll be higher.

    Even trying to being in a deficit and getting as close to maintenance as possible is still having to account for exercise calories...just at a different number. So why not account for them at maintenance?

    It is due to a sort of restriction. Regardless, would the outcome of me wanting to lose body fat while gaining tone and definition change regardless of the method used?

    Not if your goal is building muscle, IMO. If your goal is potentially a little weight loss, then yes.

    Personally, my goal for this recomp is capitalizing on what little muscle I can and increasing strength. So I prefer to be a little over in my maintenance calories. I'd prefer not to have passive 200 calorie deficit days. It's safer for me to be slightly over if anything. The worst that could happen is 8 weeks down the line, I realize I've gained a single pound, that I can lose in a couple weeks without making any major adjustments. Or embrace the pound because...it's a pound. As long as the clothes feel right and the measurements match up, I'm good. And for me, any time I've seen jumps in the scale it's just my sodium level or some muscles retaining water after a really tough workout.

    But it's up to you really. If you'd like to exclude your exercise calories for safety purposes, you can. You'll just not be in recomp...rather still cutting. You'll indeed be losing body fat, but that's it. And I doubt you want to be in a perpetual cut. At some point you have to accept the exercise calories as something you must consume.

    However, I do agree with the poster that says you might be holding onto an irrational fear. I think it's normal. It took me a second to be relaxed about maintenance. You just have to realize that if you're doing the right thing, you just don't pick up extra pounds over night.


    I would like to add, one thing that has helped me and/or others that I know is to alter your goals. Having goals based on performance, rather than weight, may help get over some irrational fears. I have a spreadsheet on my computer with all my lifts (move, weights/reps) and at the end of the program, I can conduct trend analysis or understand percentage of strength gains. Additionally, I try to take pictures (although that has been awhile) but this will allow me to see if there are any gains/progress in my composition. Because honestly, I rather be 170 with a six pack than 160 and flabby. At this point, weight is fairly meaningless to me (being a normal weight) and body composition has hit the top of my list, along with progress in performance; this also includes performance related to my other workouts (HIIT and yoga). And in both of those categories, i have seen some of my best performance over the past few months (probably due to the increase in calories and more specifically an increase in carbs).

    To touch on a previous question regarding if anything has changed as I got older. For me, I have noticed I am a lot more focused on a few things: I don't compare myself to others anymore and I am more focused on overall fitness which includes a lot more flexibility training and core training. Since I have had sciatic and plantars fasciitus issues in the past, my goal is to ensure they don't come back. So instead of just focusing in lifting and HIIT, i not incorporate flexibility training and use a foam roller more often.

    That really is VERY true about performance goals. My boyfriend called me a bro the first time I slipped in a subtle "need to fuel my workout" at a meal. It's also a big mental boost. I weigh in the morning and the number doesn't mean much to me. I get an extra 5 pounds on a lift I've been struggling with and the day is a fun happy day. I've definitely had a positive mood boost since going into maintenance.
  • senecarr
    senecarr Posts: 5,377 Member
    heybales wrote: »
    senecarr wrote: »
    Oh dear, people please flag and report.
    Edit: OK, it is gone now. Thanks.

    Wow, talk about curious now what I missed. Oh well, I'll live.

    Apparently it is a perennial troll. He used a profile pic of a man letting it all hang out, so to speak.
  • griffinca2
    griffinca2 Posts: 672 Member
    Just started my recomp this last week. Haven't been logging weights/reps/sets, etc. Need to start to follow gains I am making. Everyone have a great 4th!!
  • chezzabelle82
    chezzabelle82 Posts: 302 Member
    edited July 2015
    After reading (well a chunk of lol) this thread I am staring to think recomp is probably the way forward for me, I am off to google it now lol

    Found this while googling is this cycling the way to do it??

    http://blog.myfitnesspal.com/the-basics-of-body-recomposition-how-to-lose-fat-gain-muscle-at-the-same-time/
  • bioklutz
    bioklutz Posts: 1,365 Member
    After reading (well a chunk of lol) this thread I am staring to think recomp is probably the way forward for me, I am off to google it now lol

    Found this while googling is this cycling the way to do it??

    http://blog.myfitnesspal.com/the-basics-of-body-recomposition-how-to-lose-fat-gain-muscle-at-the-same-time/

    I read that. I initially tried to cycle calories based on what I was doing for the day and just found it to be annoying and sometimes difficult to fit into my life. I am close to 6 months in and so far have found no need to cycle.

    I went here: http://scoobysworkshop.com/calorie-calculator/ I entered all my stats and how many hours a week I exercise. I used it as a starting point to figure out my maintenance calories.

    By keeping an eye on the scale and learning how my body weight fluctuates I have a pretty good idea what is a fluctuation and what is a trend of loss or gain. By experimenting, I found my maintenance calories to be 1900 - 2000.

    The very first post has all the basics. You are maintaining your weight and following a progressive lifting program.
  • heybales
    heybales Posts: 18,830 Member
    He should have thrown in the clarifier that the extra food is going to do the most good the 24 hrs AFTER the workout - which may or may not even be the day of the workout, depending on when you do it.

    If I do a lifting session at 9 pm, I don't need to eat over maintenance that entire day, I need some after the workout of course as I start repair while sleeping - but then more calories the next day actually.

    Only thing I need to make sure of prior to the workout - is having enough in me to give a good workout. That day in general could even be the diet day overall.

    I am glad he addressed the whole stupid lean muscle confusion, which really seems to be misapplied and misunderstood. Of course, considering there is no such thing.
  • chezzabelle82
    chezzabelle82 Posts: 302 Member
    bioklutz wrote: »
    After reading (well a chunk of lol) this thread I am staring to think recomp is probably the way forward for me, I am off to google it now lol

    Found this while googling is this cycling the way to do it??

    http://blog.myfitnesspal.com/the-basics-of-body-recomposition-how-to-lose-fat-gain-muscle-at-the-same-time/

    I read that. I initially tried to cycle calories based on what I was doing for the day and just found it to be annoying and sometimes difficult to fit into my life. I am close to 6 months in and so far have found no need to cycle.

    I went here: http://scoobysworkshop.com/calorie-calculator/ I entered all my stats and how many hours a week I exercise. I used it as a starting point to figure out my maintenance calories.

    By keeping an eye on the scale and learning how my body weight fluctuates I have a pretty good idea what is a fluctuation and what is a trend of loss or gain. By experimenting, I found my maintenance calories to be 1900 - 2000.

    The very first post has all the basics. You are maintaining your weight and following a progressive lifting program.

    Thanks for that
  • sarahlifts
    sarahlifts Posts: 610 Member
    edited July 2015
    usmcmp wrote: »
    SuggaD wrote: »
    usmcmp wrote: »
    SuggaD wrote: »
    I am totally not following any particular program right now and haven't really studied the science. What is working for me right now is sticking with my tri coach's workouts (tri specific challenging cardio) and hitting the weight room hard 3x per week (machines only), progressively increasing my weights, and eating what I want (lots of carbs...needed for activity level, and sufficient protein, adequate fats). I am really happy with my progress so far and think this is the permanent way forward for me. Cutting was too hard!

    Doing machines only means you are missing out on the stabilization requirements of free weights. Using machines also means less motor unit recruitment (less bang for your buck).

    Yeah, yeah, so folks on here keep telling me. But that's ok, I like the machines and am getting great results. More than 1 way to skin a cat.

    You're right that there is more than one way to skin a cat. There is no down side to moving from machines to free weights. There are tons of benefits. It's not like people are telling you to give up something for something else, you're making an exchange for more results.

    Think of it this way: You have to make a 20 mile trip and you have a bicycle. You can either walk and push the bike, which will get you to your goal, or you can get on it and ride, which has greater benefits than walking and will get you there faster.

    I use machines too for everything but my delts. I want to get away from it b/c over a span of 2.5 years had I started with free weights and an oly bar my body would have responded better.

    Isolationg the muscle and ONLY working them that way can cause muscle imbalances that can lead to injury.

    I think its great advise to try to come away from machines only. My gym only has smith machines. I never use them. I am going to begin using the pre loaded bars for squats and lunges. It gets difficult bc I have no one to form check me. This is also a reason I stuck with machines.

  • Hornsby
    Hornsby Posts: 10,324 Member
    Just as a side note...my BFF is pretty stacked, and has one Mr. Oklahoma a couple times. He prefers machines for the isolation, especially the smith machine. He lifts very few free weights and does alright...
  • husseycd
    husseycd Posts: 815 Member
    edited July 2015
    I've been recomping for almost two years now. It took a good 6 months to a year to see results and it wasn't until I was about 1.5 years into the process that people really started commenting.

    Here's August 2013 at about 128 lbs (always have to apologize for the standing on the toilet shots. Have, like 5 years of data at this same place, way before I ever thought I'd post them publicly):
    [img][/img][IMG]http://i532.photobucket.com/albums/ee322/jivete/Lifting progress/F-08192013.jpg[/IMG]



    And May 2015. Probably closer to 130 lbs.
    [img][/img][IMG]http://i532.photobucket.com/albums/ee322/jivete/Lifting progress/IMG_20150516_150836.jpg[/IMG]



    I started lifting in September 2013, right after the first picture was taken.

    ETA: pictures not URL
  • AsISmile
    AsISmile Posts: 1,004 Member
    So I'm not the export on recomp, I still need start.

    But what I think you need to learn is to let go of that number on the scale and bmi, since recomp supposedly keeps you on the same weight, but you try to reduce your fat and increase your muscles.
    husseycd wrote: »
    I've been recomping for almost two years now. It took a good 6 months to a year to see results and it wasn't until I was about 1.5 years into the process that people really started commenting.

    Here's August 2013 at about 128 lbs (always have to apologize for the standing on the toilet shots. Have, like 5 years of data at this same place, way before I ever thought I'd post them publicly):
    [img][/img][IMG]http://i532.photobucket.com/albums/ee322/jivete/Lifting progress/F-08192013.jpg[/IMG]



    And May 2015. Probably closer to 130 lbs.
    [img][/img][IMG]http://i532.photobucket.com/albums/ee322/jivete/Lifting progress/IMG_20150516_150836.jpg[/IMG]



    I started lifting in September 2013, right after the first picture was taken.

    ETA: pictures not URL

    You look amazing.
    This is why I want to start doing recomp.
  • CarlydogsMom
    CarlydogsMom Posts: 645 Member
    husseycd wrote: »
    I've been recomping for almost two years now. It took a good 6 months to a year to see results and it wasn't until I was about 1.5 years into the process that people really started commenting.

    Here's August 2013 at about 128 lbs (always have to apologize for the standing on the toilet shots. Have, like 5 years of data at this same place, way before I ever thought I'd post them publicly):
    [img][/img][IMG]http://i532.photobucket.com/albums/ee322/jivete/Lifting progress/F-08192013.jpg[/IMG]



    And May 2015. Probably closer to 130 lbs.
    [img][/img][IMG]http://i532.photobucket.com/albums/ee322/jivete/Lifting progress/IMG_20150516_150836.jpg[/IMG]



    I started lifting in September 2013, right after the first picture was taken.

    ETA: pictures not URL

    Wow. Excellent. Also I think this really helps give people a true idea what re-comp is like and how long it generally takes. Hard for most folks to wrap their heads around the time frame. I'm sure there are other re-comp stories of people making changes in less time, but I suspect most will be along the time frame that you experienced. Well done, way to stick with it and have a long-term goal--and reach it!!!
  • husseycd
    husseycd Posts: 815 Member
    Thanks! As much as I'd like to attempt a true bulk/cut, I know it wouldn't work for me. I attempted a mini one last year (attempting to gain 5 lbs), but I never got that far before I was trying to do a mini cut for a Jamaica vacation.

    For a while I thought I was spinning my wheels by recomping, but not any more. I'm not looking for major changes at this point anyway, just small improvements. TBH, when I started I wasn't looking for major changes. I think that's why recomp is best when you're at a comfortable, healthy weight. I wasn't totally unhappy with my "before". I just thought I needed a little more ab definition and a little more thigh/glute muscle (still working on 'em) to balance out my top half, already pretty well defined from years of aerial circus type hobbies. If you are looking for a total overhaul or are really under-muscled, at least one true bulk might be in order.

    There's a Lyle McDonald article floating around (I searched his website, but I wasn't able to locate it) where he talks about how bulk/cut doesn't work for everyone. It helped me realize that I don't need to bulk. I still believe it's probably the fastest way to achieve goals, but I'm fine at this pace. It's sustainable for me.