Teacher says Pop Tarts are not a healthy snack

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  • Domomallow
    Domomallow Posts: 87 Member
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    laur357 wrote: »
    Clearly, his teacher is just angry because there's a revolt underway and everyone wants Pop-Tarts. :)

    You can keep sending them as long as you choose the fruit-filled kind. Cherry is totally healthy. S'more flavor is, in fact, the devil.

    I quite enjoy the s'more flavored poptarts... but they are hard to fit into my diet. lol
    Probably because they are the devil. ;)
  • skinnyinnotime
    skinnyinnotime Posts: 4,141 Member
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    Schools make up stupid rules which make no sense all the time...at my kids school they can bring a snack of biscuit covered in chocolate, but cannot have a chocolate only bar. There you go.

  • AngryViking1970
    AngryViking1970 Posts: 2,847 Member
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    Ooooh, cherry and s'mores are my favorite!
  • singingflutelady
    singingflutelady Posts: 8,736 Member
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    everher wrote: »
    I don't think the "only healthy snacks" rule is too unusual. I have heard of similar rules at schools down here.

    I think the teacher could have handled it differently though. This seems like a conversation that should've taken place between the teacher and you not the teacher and your son.

    But what's the definition of "healthy"? As I mentioned for me vegetables and fruit are not healthy at all and there are many people with my disease. There is already enough stigma that a child shouldn't be told not to eat something according to some arbitrary nutrition rule that doesn't take into consideration each person's personal needs.
  • Naptownbabi
    Naptownbabi Posts: 256 Member
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    mom22dogs wrote: »
    In my opinion, something that derives all of it's calories from sugar and fat, and has no other real nutrients in it, is junk food, and looking at the nutritional value of poptarts, that's what they are, fat and sugar, which I personally wouldn't want my kid to eat. I would rather they eat an apple, or veggies, or something like that.

    I also think that schools are trying to teach kids about nutrition because unfortunately, not everyone teaches their kids about making good choices for food. I can understand you being upset, but I can also understand the school as well.

    So kids who have medical conditions who can not eat fruits and vegetables with serious pain and GI issues should be forced to go hungry because what is healthy for them is different than what is healthy for you?

    Oh my goodness don't even get me started-my daughter is lactose intolerant and back in pre-school it was mandatory that they had to drink milk for snack time. We hadn't had her formally tested yet but we knew dairy caused her issues and requested that she have water instead. The teacher refused and forced her to drink the dang milk behind our backs and she kept coming home so sick :/ I was livid when I found out what was happening and we pulled her out mid year.

    I would have lost it if my kid was coming home sick every day. Just reading that made me so mad for you, I want to mentally yell at that teacher for you over the internet.
  • ummijaaz560
    ummijaaz560 Posts: 228 Member
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    Just want to add that I mostly send fruit with him. We buy fruit in small quantity because it will go bad.

    He at least will not be like me thinking you get two pop tarts per serving (I really thought you got two).
    He only gets one and the box lasts like two weeks. :D
  • singingflutelady
    singingflutelady Posts: 8,736 Member
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    @crzycatlady1 that annoys me to no end. When I was in inpatient eating disorder treatment they forced to eat everything, even foods you legitimately hated like peas or onions that have no real part of your ED except for food allergies BUT since lactose intolerance is not an allergy I was forced to drink milk and eat lactose containing foods at every meal! I was so so sick but they didn't care. I can just imagine how badly they would handle my Crohn's food restrictions if I ended up back in treatment as they are not allergies either.
    mom22dogs wrote: »
    In my opinion, something that derives all of it's calories from sugar and fat, and has no other real nutrients in it, is junk food, and looking at the nutritional value of poptarts, that's what they are, fat and sugar, which I personally wouldn't want my kid to eat. I would rather they eat an apple, or veggies, or something like that.

    I also think that schools are trying to teach kids about nutrition because unfortunately, not everyone teaches their kids about making good choices for food. I can understand you being upset, but I can also understand the school as well.

    So kids who have medical conditions who can not eat fruits and vegetables with serious pain and GI issues should be forced to go hungry because what is healthy for them is different than what is healthy for you?

    Oh my goodness don't even get me started-my daughter is lactose intolerant and back in pre-school it was mandatory that they had to drink milk for snack time. We hadn't had her formally tested yet but we knew dairy caused her issues and requested that she have water instead. The teacher refused and forced her to drink the dang milk behind our backs and she kept coming home so sick :/ I was livid when I found out what was happening and we pulled her out mid year.
  • crzycatlady1
    crzycatlady1 Posts: 1,930 Member
    edited January 2017
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    mom22dogs wrote: »
    In my opinion, something that derives all of it's calories from sugar and fat, and has no other real nutrients in it, is junk food, and looking at the nutritional value of poptarts, that's what they are, fat and sugar, which I personally wouldn't want my kid to eat. I would rather they eat an apple, or veggies, or something like that.

    I also think that schools are trying to teach kids about nutrition because unfortunately, not everyone teaches their kids about making good choices for food. I can understand you being upset, but I can also understand the school as well.

    So kids who have medical conditions who can not eat fruits and vegetables with serious pain and GI issues should be forced to go hungry because what is healthy for them is different than what is healthy for you?

    Oh my goodness don't even get me started-my daughter is lactose intolerant and back in pre-school it was mandatory that they had to drink milk for snack time. We hadn't had her formally tested yet but we knew dairy caused her issues and requested that she have water instead. The teacher refused and forced her to drink the dang milk behind our backs and she kept coming home so sick :/ I was livid when I found out what was happening and we pulled her out mid year.

    I would have lost it if my kid was coming home sick every day. Just reading that made me so mad for you, I want to mentally yell at that teacher for you over the internet.

    I was soooo angry and was not a nice person when I found out what was going on lol. A couple years after we did have formal allergy testing done and my daughter was formally 'diagnosed' as lactose intolerant. She can handle some dairy products, like cheese and yogurt with pills, but she still cannot have straight up milk or she spends hours in the bathroom :(
  • psuLemon
    psuLemon Posts: 38,402 MFP Moderator
    edited January 2017
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    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    OMG - Pop Tarts are NOT healthy foods - and kudos to the teacher for trying to educate their students, and parents. Granola bars are just as bad... what's wrong with carrots, apples, grapes, and celery sticks? Seriously people!

    I would consider pop tarts to be junk food...but I also wouldn't appreciate a teacher dictating to me or my child what they can and cannot have, particularly if it's a public institution.

    My kids eat junk food some times...they also eat carrots, apples, grapes, and celery sticks...they're fine...calm down.

    Pretty much. I even give my 1 year old some junk food (love ice cream and cool whip), but overall their diet is pretty solid (chicken, fruit, yogurt). As a parent, I am responsible for teach my children what they can eat and in what quantity.
  • ummijaaz560
    ummijaaz560 Posts: 228 Member
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    They sent a note saying we had to provide two snacks plus lunch for the child.

    I didnt see anything specifying what was an acceptable healthy snack item. We just cant send nuts, or seafood.
  • singingflutelady
    singingflutelady Posts: 8,736 Member
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    mom22dogs wrote: »
    In my opinion, something that derives all of it's calories from sugar and fat, and has no other real nutrients in it, is junk food, and looking at the nutritional value of poptarts, that's what they are, fat and sugar, which I personally wouldn't want my kid to eat. I would rather they eat an apple, or veggies, or something like that.

    I also think that schools are trying to teach kids about nutrition because unfortunately, not everyone teaches their kids about making good choices for food. I can understand you being upset, but I can also understand the school as well.

    So kids who have medical conditions who can not eat fruits and vegetables with serious pain and GI issues should be forced to go hungry because what is healthy for them is different than what is healthy for you?

    Oh my goodness don't even get me started-my daughter is lactose intolerant and back in pre-school it was mandatory that they had to drink milk for snack time. We hadn't had her formally tested yet but we knew dairy caused her issues and requested that she have water instead. The teacher refused and forced her to drink the dang milk behind our backs and she kept coming home so sick :/ I was livid when I found out what was happening and we pulled her out mid year.

    I would have lost it if my kid was coming home sick every day. Just reading that made me so mad for you, I want to mentally yell at that teacher for you over the internet.

    I was soooo angry and was not a nice person when I found out what was going on lol. A couple years after we did have formal allergy testing done and my daughter was formally diagnosed as lactose intolerant. She can handle some dairy products, like cheese and yogurt with pills, but she still cannot have straight up milk or she spends hours in the bathroom :(

    As someone with Crohn's, IBS, lactose intolerance and many food restrictions for that very reason I can relate so much to this! It's so hard when forced to consume something you know will make you sick!
  • Alyssa_Is_LosingIt
    Alyssa_Is_LosingIt Posts: 4,696 Member
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    This kind of thing really makes me angry. You are correct - they have their definitions of "healthy" food messed up if they think that a granola bar or Gogurt is better than the occasional Pop Tart. I agree with asking to read the policy or seeing if you can find it in the student handbook, and I would take it to the principal or BOE and go from there.

    I think you're doing just fine teaching your child about food. I am doing it a similar way with my children (6 & 3), and they understand that there are foods that are fine to eat sometimes but not every day. My 6-year-old takes a yogurt/string cheese and a fruit/vegetable for snack most days, but I let him take cookies on Fridays. He is a healthy weight, and luckily our school system does not have arbitrary rules about only bringing "healthy" snacks.
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