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What are your unpopular opinions about health / fitness?

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Replies

  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 26,208 Member
    earlnabby wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    tomteboda wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    CSARdiver wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    tomteboda wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    It challenges my imagination to believe that evolution designed us to do best with any complicated, arcane, meticulous, analytically-compulsive way of eating.

    P,S. Despite the timing, this opinion has zip-zero-nada to do with soda of any kind, or the lack thereof. In fact, personally, frankly, I'm tired of the soda discussion.

    We are evolved to survive long enough to procreate and raise our children to do likewise under conditions of food scarcity, hard physical demand, and high disease.

    Science and technological advances are mucking up evolutionary balances. I can't really see this as bad.

    I don't necessarily see that as bad, either. Science & technology are, in a sense, evolutionary pressures we ourselves have created.

    I'm a little concerned about the effect of product liability law on population intelligence over time, though. (<=== This part is a joke. Sort of. ;) )

    This one keeps me up at night. We previously by default eliminated the lowest common denominator through life. Implementation of hot coffee warnings, safety caps, seat belt laws, etc. spells certain doom for the human race.

    Not so much those, but ones like the lawnmower with a warning not to use it as a hedge trimmer, or the vacuum cleaner warning that it shouldn't be used to vacuum up burning materials. Lawyers don't think up warnings like that on a purely theoretical basis: Someone, somewhere, has done it and sued.

    A high school classmate of my mom's lost his third leg to a vacuum cleaner hose. I'm pretty sure he's the reason they say not to put body parts in the hose. Think of the lifelong misery a warning label saves!

    But the gene pool . . .! ;););)

    Those genes are likely no longer in the pool. Vacuum hose accidents can do that.

    But that's the point: If there are warnings, and those people read/heed them . . . yikes to the gene pool!
  • mph323
    mph323 Posts: 3,566 Member
    tomteboda wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    CSARdiver wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    tomteboda wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    It challenges my imagination to believe that evolution designed us to do best with any complicated, arcane, meticulous, analytically-compulsive way of eating.

    P,S. Despite the timing, this opinion has zip-zero-nada to do with soda of any kind, or the lack thereof. In fact, personally, frankly, I'm tired of the soda discussion.

    We are evolved to survive long enough to procreate and raise our children to do likewise under conditions of food scarcity, hard physical demand, and high disease.

    Science and technological advances are mucking up evolutionary balances. I can't really see this as bad.

    I don't necessarily see that as bad, either. Science & technology are, in a sense, evolutionary pressures we ourselves have created.

    I'm a little concerned about the effect of product liability law on population intelligence over time, though. (<=== This part is a joke. Sort of. ;) )

    This one keeps me up at night. We previously by default eliminated the lowest common denominator through life. Implementation of hot coffee warnings, safety caps, seat belt laws, etc. spells certain doom for the human race.

    Not so much those, but ones like the lawnmower with a warning not to use it as a hedge trimmer, or the vacuum cleaner warning that it shouldn't be used to vacuum up burning materials. Lawyers don't think up warnings like that on a purely theoretical basis: Someone, somewhere, has done it and sued.

    A high school classmate of my mom's lost his third leg to a vacuum cleaner hose. I'm pretty sure he's the reason they say not to put body parts in the hose. Think of the lifelong misery a warning label saves!

    I have to ask - didn't he get along ok on his remaining two?

    Just kidding, I know what you meant :)
  • SezxyStef
    SezxyStef Posts: 15,270 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    earlnabby wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    tomteboda wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    CSARdiver wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    tomteboda wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    It challenges my imagination to believe that evolution designed us to do best with any complicated, arcane, meticulous, analytically-compulsive way of eating.

    P,S. Despite the timing, this opinion has zip-zero-nada to do with soda of any kind, or the lack thereof. In fact, personally, frankly, I'm tired of the soda discussion.

    We are evolved to survive long enough to procreate and raise our children to do likewise under conditions of food scarcity, hard physical demand, and high disease.

    Science and technological advances are mucking up evolutionary balances. I can't really see this as bad.

    I don't necessarily see that as bad, either. Science & technology are, in a sense, evolutionary pressures we ourselves have created.

    I'm a little concerned about the effect of product liability law on population intelligence over time, though. (<=== This part is a joke. Sort of. ;) )

    This one keeps me up at night. We previously by default eliminated the lowest common denominator through life. Implementation of hot coffee warnings, safety caps, seat belt laws, etc. spells certain doom for the human race.

    Not so much those, but ones like the lawnmower with a warning not to use it as a hedge trimmer, or the vacuum cleaner warning that it shouldn't be used to vacuum up burning materials. Lawyers don't think up warnings like that on a purely theoretical basis: Someone, somewhere, has done it and sued.

    A high school classmate of my mom's lost his third leg to a vacuum cleaner hose. I'm pretty sure he's the reason they say not to put body parts in the hose. Think of the lifelong misery a warning label saves!

    But the gene pool . . .! ;););)

    Those genes are likely no longer in the pool. Vacuum hose accidents can do that.

    But that's the point: If there are warnings, and those people read/heed them . . . yikes to the gene pool!

    1337873911750_2637358.png

    you sound like my husband...he says this all the time.
  • Christine_72
    Christine_72 Posts: 16,051 Member
    edited September 2017
    [

  • cmriverside
    cmriverside Posts: 32,618 Member
    [

    lol. agree.

    Butt posting?
  • Christine_72
    Christine_72 Posts: 16,051 Member
    [

    lol. agree.

    Butt posting?

    hehe The Gif i posted didn't come out right. So i rage deleted the whole thing :rage:

  • RuNaRoUnDaFiEld
    RuNaRoUnDaFiEld Posts: 5,864 Member
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-4866646/It-s-not-eat-s-eat-matters.html

    My unpopular opinion is that this article and "Study" is a load of *kitten*

    I always eat before bed.

    It all boils down to metabolism, giving the body enough time to digest.
    However, while the internet is full of specific plans for dieters saying what time of day to eat, none of those take into account how it could be affected by different schedules.
    Our metabolism is affected by our circadian rhythm (i.e. body clock). For some, our body clock is the standard night-day. But for others who work night shifts or burn the candles at both ends, it is not so simple.
    Now, researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital have conducted the first study showing how meal times affect your weight gain, depending on what time you rise and sleep.


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-4866646/It-s-not-eat-s-eat-matters.html#ixzz4sDAgPNmR
    Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
  • ccruz985
    ccruz985 Posts: 646 Member
    jdlobb wrote: »
    Regular soda right after a workout can be a good use of a calories and a nice treat.

    Not for me. I would rather have dates because I like them better. That's why I specified "for me".

    DATES. Weakness for me, omg. I have no limits.
  • mathjulz
    mathjulz Posts: 5,526 Member
    AnvilHead wrote: »
    Taubes's hypothesis on the cause of obesity was falsified in controlled conditions. Twice.

    Taubes also conflates "how" and "why" (his infamous movie theater entry scenario) and those two questions 1) aren't the same thing and 2) have different answers and 3) in the case of "why" doesn't have the same answer for every individual.

    Taubes thinking that "why" and "how" are the same thing, or rather, that "why" negates the fact that "how" is indeed taking place represents a basic misunderstanding of human physiology and logical failing on his part and as well as a failure to entertain complex thinking that would show he's interested in truly finding answers and not just selling books and peddling nonsense.

    Taubes' own research institute (NuSi) has done research which resulted in findings contrary to his theories. He has flat out said that even if there was conclusive scientific research which disproved his theories (which there is), he wouldn't change his mind. That doesn't sound like a researcher, that sounds like a crackpot with an agenda - which is exactly what Taubes is.

    Off topic, but I see this and think sodium silicide. Which isn't even right because sodium is Na. :lol:
  • J72FIT
    J72FIT Posts: 5,932 Member
    SezxyStef wrote: »
    J72FIT wrote: »
    SezxyStef wrote: »
    Everyone can make time to be more active. Literally everyone. You don't have to set aside a specific block of time and grind it out on the treadmill if that's not your thing. You could walk/bike to work instead of driving. You could go for a walk on your lunch break instead of being sedentary. You could stand at your desk and do squats, for goodness sake. Lack of time is an excuse that really means "this isn't a priority for me."

    you are correct but sometimes you can't make it a priority to exercise...this whole "what's your excuse " BS is exactly that...BS...and this coming from someone who exercises a lot.

    Exercise is a choice and isn't required to lose weight...or be healthy even...it's a requirement to be fit.

    Personally I don't go for the all or nothing mentality. As life changes so do one's priorities. I believe in keeping a top 5 list. The top 5 may change their order but they will generally be up there...

    I don't either...and I think that priorities are a fluid thing as well.

    Mine change...I used to garden a lot and pickle..it was a priority...not so much now...top 10 but eh.

    Exercise top 5...but it might slip down the list it would depend on the circumstance

    What you put time into is where your true priorities can be found...
  • SezxyStef
    SezxyStef Posts: 15,270 Member
    J72FIT wrote: »
    SezxyStef wrote: »
    J72FIT wrote: »
    SezxyStef wrote: »
    Everyone can make time to be more active. Literally everyone. You don't have to set aside a specific block of time and grind it out on the treadmill if that's not your thing. You could walk/bike to work instead of driving. You could go for a walk on your lunch break instead of being sedentary. You could stand at your desk and do squats, for goodness sake. Lack of time is an excuse that really means "this isn't a priority for me."

    you are correct but sometimes you can't make it a priority to exercise...this whole "what's your excuse " BS is exactly that...BS...and this coming from someone who exercises a lot.

    Exercise is a choice and isn't required to lose weight...or be healthy even...it's a requirement to be fit.

    Personally I don't go for the all or nothing mentality. As life changes so do one's priorities. I believe in keeping a top 5 list. The top 5 may change their order but they will generally be up there...

    I don't either...and I think that priorities are a fluid thing as well.

    Mine change...I used to garden a lot and pickle..it was a priority...not so much now...top 10 but eh.

    Exercise top 5...but it might slip down the list it would depend on the circumstance

    What you put time into is where your true priorities can be found...

    okay...but not so much.

    example highest priority for me is to spend time with my husband...but with his work schedule I don't get the time...but when I do it's devoted to him....(he works 12 hour shifts and a lot of OT)
This discussion has been closed.