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The Sober Squad- Alcohol Free Living

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  • RubyRed427RubyRed427 Member Posts: 2,656 Member Member Posts: 2,656 Member
    donimfp wrote: »
    In yesterday's Sober School, we were asked to make a list titled "Things I Hated [past tense] about Drinking." My list is very, very long. It was an interesting and useful exercise for me because I have often made "Why I Want to Quit Drinking" lists, which focus on what I will gain (better sleep, weight loss, improved appearance, more time, etc.). However, those potential gains are kind of abstract because I haven't really experienced them yet. But the things I hate(d) about drinking are very vivid and real to me: waking up at 3 a.m. in a panic, puffy face in the mirror, nausea, increased blood pressure/blood sugar."

    It's a subtle little switch, but I think this list will be the one I refer to when I'm tempted to drink, simply because it is so real and painful for me. The positives seem very far off when the booze is beckoning. The negatives are just a drink away.

    The lists are such good ideas to reflect on and remind / reinforce resolve, I think. I made up a list quite recently titled After Bingeing. I listed all the undesirable & negative effects of after a binge, but I also included all the rubbish that can happen during. Bursting into tears, was 1 of them. I clearly remember being out at the pub, last year I'm sure with my partner and we were basically just getting drunk. We seemed to be enjoying ourselves and suddenly I began crying, right there in the middle of the pub. I had grossly underestimated just how drunk I had became and I remember feeling quite embarrassed and wondering how on earth, when I'm meant to be 'enjoying' myself, am I crying ?? Just proves how alcohol messes up our emotions. But yeah, I really like how honest iv been on my list and it DEFINETLY helps to remind myself why I don't wana carry on boozing.

    You triggered a memory of one year ago. My 50th birthday out with friends. I had been day drinking so by evening I was drunk, but I had a few more glasses, despite friends pushing my glass away from me. So half way through the dinner, I was looking at two of my friends smoking and felt that they were talking about me. Maybe they were or weren't but I was getting upset. Then I started CRYING a lot just like you did. I was crying at the table and then I had to leave the restaurant because I couldn't stop.

    It is a really bad memory for me. This year, I am having no party and will go out with three friends to dinner and I dont want to drink at all.
  • RubyRed427RubyRed427 Member Posts: 2,656 Member Member Posts: 2,656 Member
    I am half way through the book "Mrs. D is going without." It really resonates with me. I know exactly how she is feeling and thinking ....
  • donimfpdonimfp Member Posts: 636 Member Member Posts: 636 Member
    Glad you’re liking it, @RubyRed427. I felt she was extremely relatable, too. Her next book was “Mrs. D is Going Within,” apparently about practices she developed to help with sobriety. I like the clever title. I think Kate said she has a newer book with “Wine o’clock” in the title.
  • RubyRed427RubyRed427 Member Posts: 2,656 Member Member Posts: 2,656 Member
    The pink cloud syndrome is very common among those who are in early recovery from an alcohol or drug addiction. Many first-time Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) members will talk about their pink clouds. The good news is that the pink cloud syndrome helps many people continue to stay sober. If you are experiencing the pink cloud, you may feel very joyful. You may have a great deal of excitement and hope for your future. On the other hand, the pink cloud may make you dangerously overconfident. Such overconfidence may make you relapse.

    Have you all heard of this? It's also in the book Ms. D goes without. Apparently it is a common term used during recovery.
  • FeelinFooFooFeelinFooFoo Member Posts: 4,217 Member Member Posts: 4,217 Member
    RubyRed427 wrote: »
    The pink cloud syndrome is very common among those who are in early recovery from an alcohol or drug addiction. Many first-time Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) members will talk about their pink clouds. The good news is that the pink cloud syndrome helps many people continue to stay sober. If you are experiencing the pink cloud, you may feel very joyful. You may have a great deal of excitement and hope for your future. On the other hand, the pink cloud may make you dangerously overconfident. Such overconfidence may make you relapse.

    Have you all heard of this? It's also in the book Ms. D goes without. Apparently it is a common term used during recovery.

    I'm gona look into this, it rings a bell somewhere for some reason. It sounds intresting so I'm gona look online. Isn't Google great ?! Anything you want to find out about at your fingertips!
  • FeelinFooFooFeelinFooFoo Member Posts: 4,217 Member Member Posts: 4,217 Member
    RubyRed427 wrote: »
    Tonight is my birthday dinner with drinking friends. I WILL not drink tonight. I promised myself that. I cannot slip back into my old ways. I cannot fool myself into thinking anything about alcohol will help me have a good time. I like the picture above- alcohol causes pain and anxiety and it's a cycle .... it Never cures anxiety or pain.

    I hope you have a lovely birthday dinner, and Happy Birthday! 💖🎊 you could always get a mocktail as an alternative drink ? Or because you will be saving all those alcohol calories, a nice slice of cake? Mmm. In a way, staying sober is like a birthday gift to yourself cos when you wake up next day you'll be all fresh & awake. 😊
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