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What are your unpopular opinions about health / fitness?

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Replies

  • TR0berts
    TR0berts Posts: 7,739 Member
    mmapags wrote: »
    Is it a jelly roll, a jelly doughnut, or a Bismark?
    Do you drink from a drinking fountain, a water fountain, or a bubbler?
    Do you eat subs, hoagies, or grinders?
    Of course, there is the ultimate: soda or pop? (or Coke, or tonic)


    ...and this is why humans will never be able to communicate whatsoever.

    Bismarks are those chocolate covered donuts with pudding inside. It's my favorite.

    dd21RS.jpg
    1. Water fountain
    2. Sub
    3. Coke

    I can't even cite regional differences. I've lived in PA, FL, CA, WA. Not sure when or where I came up with these beliefs. It's my feels.

    Lol! The chef in me is having a cringe moment. That is not pudding in a Bismark. It is Creme' Patisserie. It's my foodie OCD kicking in I know... :D

    That gets us into the UK's version of "salad", I suppose.

    Let's talk about the ambiguity of the word "pudding" across the pond...

    Pudding is interchangeable with dessert in the UK. It predates all those fancy French things becoming de rigueur. I'm cool with the fancy French things though.

    Huh. I realize Ireland != UK, but when my wife and I were in Ireland ~8 years ago, we got pudding at breakfast. They brought us sausage. I don't remember which was which, but there was a "black" and a "red" version. IIRC, one of them was called "blood pudding," while the other was not. Or maybe it was just the particular spices in each. I remember liking the "not blood" version, while didn't care much for the "blood" version - and this was, I think, before knowing it was made with blood. So not just a psychological thing.

    Just a difference between Ireland and UK, or is "blood pudding" simply like how we call your egg mayo egg "salad?"
  • livingleanlivingclean
    livingleanlivingclean Posts: 11,755 Member
    TR0berts wrote: »
    mmapags wrote: »
    Is it a jelly roll, a jelly doughnut, or a Bismark?
    Do you drink from a drinking fountain, a water fountain, or a bubbler?
    Do you eat subs, hoagies, or grinders?
    Of course, there is the ultimate: soda or pop? (or Coke, or tonic)


    ...and this is why humans will never be able to communicate whatsoever.

    Bismarks are those chocolate covered donuts with pudding inside. It's my favorite.

    dd21RS.jpg
    1. Water fountain
    2. Sub
    3. Coke

    I can't even cite regional differences. I've lived in PA, FL, CA, WA. Not sure when or where I came up with these beliefs. It's my feels.

    Lol! The chef in me is having a cringe moment. That is not pudding in a Bismark. It is Creme' Patisserie. It's my foodie OCD kicking in I know... :D

    That gets us into the UK's version of "salad", I suppose.

    Let's talk about the ambiguity of the word "pudding" across the pond...

    Pudding is interchangeable with dessert in the UK. It predates all those fancy French things becoming de rigueur. I'm cool with the fancy French things though.

    Huh. I realize Ireland != UK, but when my wife and I were in Ireland ~8 years ago, we got pudding at breakfast. They brought us sausage. I don't remember which was which, but there was a "black" and a "red" version. IIRC, one of them was called "blood pudding," while the other was not. Or maybe it was just the particular spices in each. I remember liking the "not blood" version, while didn't care much for the "blood" version - and this was, I think, before knowing it was made with blood. So not just a psychological thing.

    Just a difference between Ireland and UK, or is "blood pudding" simply like how we call your egg mayo egg "salad?"

    Black pudding is blood sausage. Urgh. No idea why it is called pudding though! Another version is white sausage (no blood, lots of fat)
  • VintageFeline
    VintageFeline Posts: 6,771 Member
    TR0berts wrote: »
    mmapags wrote: »
    Is it a jelly roll, a jelly doughnut, or a Bismark?
    Do you drink from a drinking fountain, a water fountain, or a bubbler?
    Do you eat subs, hoagies, or grinders?
    Of course, there is the ultimate: soda or pop? (or Coke, or tonic)


    ...and this is why humans will never be able to communicate whatsoever.

    Bismarks are those chocolate covered donuts with pudding inside. It's my favorite.

    dd21RS.jpg
    1. Water fountain
    2. Sub
    3. Coke

    I can't even cite regional differences. I've lived in PA, FL, CA, WA. Not sure when or where I came up with these beliefs. It's my feels.

    Lol! The chef in me is having a cringe moment. That is not pudding in a Bismark. It is Creme' Patisserie. It's my foodie OCD kicking in I know... :D

    That gets us into the UK's version of "salad", I suppose.

    Let's talk about the ambiguity of the word "pudding" across the pond...

    Pudding is interchangeable with dessert in the UK. It predates all those fancy French things becoming de rigueur. I'm cool with the fancy French things though.

    Huh. I realize Ireland != UK, but when my wife and I were in Ireland ~8 years ago, we got pudding at breakfast. They brought us sausage. I don't remember which was which, but there was a "black" and a "red" version. IIRC, one of them was called "blood pudding," while the other was not. Or maybe it was just the particular spices in each. I remember liking the "not blood" version, while didn't care much for the "blood" version - and this was, I think, before knowing it was made with blood. So not just a psychological thing.

    Just a difference between Ireland and UK, or is "blood pudding" simply like how we call your egg mayo egg "salad?"

    Ah yes, well you see, Brits are contrary and we use words with many contexts. One version is indeed sweet after dinner delicious things.

    But pudding also refers black pudding, white pudding (I'll admit I don't know what's in the white one but it's delicious battered, which you will find in fish and chip shops in Scotland), but I don't know what red pudding is, that's a new one on me.

    Then there's the suet pastry steamed pie version of pudding like steak and ale or steak and kidney. But all of the savoury versions are preceded by some indicator of their savouryness, like steak and kidney pudding, black pudding etc.

    Whereas the sweet variety is used on its own to cover the broad range of items that dessert. So in a restaurant, it would be, "are you going to have pudding?" when trying to work out if you want to give yourself away as a complete pig. *tingue in cheek emoji*
  • estherdragonbat
    estherdragonbat Posts: 5,285 Member
    To me, with no context, the word 'pudding' conjures up the thickened creamy dairy dessert. I've read enough UK-originating books to know about the 'dessert in general, too' definition, though it tossed me for a loop when I was about ten and read Asterix and Cleopatra in translation. (There's a line when she's delivered a cake and tells her servant she'll have it for 'pudding' that night that left me wondering if she meant to puree it and boil it in milk or something...)

    However, I've seen plenty of my mom's cookbooks refer to kugels (sweet or savory gratins made with vegetables and/or noodles, sometimes with fruit or cheese) as puddings. Potato pudding, noodle pudding, etc. These are usually side dishes—although I'm still trying to figure out the difference between an apple kugel and a fruit-on-the-bottom apple cake.
  • VintageFeline
    VintageFeline Posts: 6,771 Member
    I don't know what a kugel is but fruit on the bottom cake if turned out to show the fruit would be upside down cake here in the UK, most commonly made with tinned pineapple rings. Dunno if it's the same thing though!
  • earlnabby
    earlnabby Posts: 8,177 Member
    To me, with no context, the word 'pudding' conjures up the thickened creamy dairy dessert. I've read enough UK-originating books to know about the 'dessert in general, too' definition, though it tossed me for a loop when I was about ten and read Asterix and Cleopatra in translation. (There's a line when she's delivered a cake and tells her servant she'll have it for 'pudding' that night that left me wondering if she meant to puree it and boil it in milk or something...)

    However, I've seen plenty of my mom's cookbooks refer to kugels (sweet or savory gratins made with vegetables and/or noodles, sometimes with fruit or cheese) as puddings. Potato pudding, noodle pudding, etc. These are usually side dishes—although I'm still trying to figure out the difference between an apple kugel and a fruit-on-the-bottom apple cake.

    I do get funny looks when I talk about our family's standard holiday dinner which usually includes corn pudding and sometimes suet pudding. Corn pudding is a kind of gratin with corn and lots of eggs, cream and butter. Suet pudding is similar to plum pudding but it uses only dried fruits like raisins and dates and is steamed in a mold. Think of it as a dense, moist cake without a ton of sugar (sweetness is added with the hard sauce). I have a grocery with a really good butcher and I can get the really nice, pure white suet from around the kidneys from him.
  • VintageFeline
    VintageFeline Posts: 6,771 Member
    We have a similar thing in Scotland, the fruit dumpling cake, called a clooty dumpling.
  • cmriverside
    cmriverside Posts: 32,789 Member
    edited August 2017
    Thanks, VF. Now I want Pineapple Upside Down Cake.

    My mom used to make a cake of deliciousness for me when I visited.

    I lost the recipe and she died. I am verklempt.

    Well, not completely. But I wish I had that recipe. It had coconut and pineapple and vanilla cake and whipped frosting and...maybe I should try to wing it...
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    But all of the savoury versions are preceded by some indicator of their savouryness, like steak and kidney pudding, black pudding etc.

    This is analogous to how "salad" has one meaning in the US, and then salad preceded by other words (like egg, chicken) convey something else, not the same as just salad.
  • estherdragonbat
    estherdragonbat Posts: 5,285 Member
    I don't know what a kugel is but fruit on the bottom cake if turned out to show the fruit would be upside down cake here in the UK, most commonly made with tinned pineapple rings. Dunno if it's the same thing though!

    Here's one recipe. The apples are mixed into the batter, for this one, though: https://gourmetkoshercooking.com/2012/09/cinnamon-apple-kugel/
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 26,879 Member
    TR0berts wrote: »
    mmapags wrote: »
    Is it a jelly roll, a jelly doughnut, or a Bismark?
    Do you drink from a drinking fountain, a water fountain, or a bubbler?
    Do you eat subs, hoagies, or grinders?
    Of course, there is the ultimate: soda or pop? (or Coke, or tonic)


    ...and this is why humans will never be able to communicate whatsoever.

    Bismarks are those chocolate covered donuts with pudding inside. It's my favorite.

    dd21RS.jpg
    1. Water fountain
    2. Sub
    3. Coke

    I can't even cite regional differences. I've lived in PA, FL, CA, WA. Not sure when or where I came up with these beliefs. It's my feels.

    Lol! The chef in me is having a cringe moment. That is not pudding in a Bismark. It is Creme' Patisserie. It's my foodie OCD kicking in I know... :D

    That gets us into the UK's version of "salad", I suppose.

    Let's talk about the ambiguity of the word "pudding" across the pond...

    Pudding is interchangeable with dessert in the UK. It predates all those fancy French things becoming de rigueur. I'm cool with the fancy French things though.

    Huh. I realize Ireland != UK, but when my wife and I were in Ireland ~8 years ago, we got pudding at breakfast. They brought us sausage. I don't remember which was which, but there was a "black" and a "red" version. IIRC, one of them was called "blood pudding," while the other was not. Or maybe it was just the particular spices in each. I remember liking the "not blood" version, while didn't care much for the "blood" version - and this was, I think, before knowing it was made with blood. So not just a psychological thing.

    Just a difference between Ireland and UK, or is "blood pudding" simply like how we call your egg mayo egg "salad?"

    This whole line of discussion makes me think of "head cheese", which - as an ovo-lacto veg - I am relieved and grateful to say is not even cheese at all.
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    TR0berts wrote: »
    mmapags wrote: »
    Is it a jelly roll, a jelly doughnut, or a Bismark?
    Do you drink from a drinking fountain, a water fountain, or a bubbler?
    Do you eat subs, hoagies, or grinders?
    Of course, there is the ultimate: soda or pop? (or Coke, or tonic)


    ...and this is why humans will never be able to communicate whatsoever.

    Bismarks are those chocolate covered donuts with pudding inside. It's my favorite.

    dd21RS.jpg
    1. Water fountain
    2. Sub
    3. Coke

    I can't even cite regional differences. I've lived in PA, FL, CA, WA. Not sure when or where I came up with these beliefs. It's my feels.

    Lol! The chef in me is having a cringe moment. That is not pudding in a Bismark. It is Creme' Patisserie. It's my foodie OCD kicking in I know... :D

    That gets us into the UK's version of "salad", I suppose.

    Let's talk about the ambiguity of the word "pudding" across the pond...

    Pudding is interchangeable with dessert in the UK. It predates all those fancy French things becoming de rigueur. I'm cool with the fancy French things though.

    Huh. I realize Ireland != UK, but when my wife and I were in Ireland ~8 years ago, we got pudding at breakfast. They brought us sausage. I don't remember which was which, but there was a "black" and a "red" version. IIRC, one of them was called "blood pudding," while the other was not. Or maybe it was just the particular spices in each. I remember liking the "not blood" version, while didn't care much for the "blood" version - and this was, I think, before knowing it was made with blood. So not just a psychological thing.

    Just a difference between Ireland and UK, or is "blood pudding" simply like how we call your egg mayo egg "salad?"

    This whole line of discussion makes me think of "head cheese", which - as an ovo-lacto veg - I am relieved and grateful to say is not even cheese at all.

    My second favorite not what it sounds like is Welsh rabbit (which granted is usually "Welsh rarebit" these days, but not in some older cook books I have).

    What's my favorite? Sweetbread!
This discussion has been closed.