What Was Your Work Out Today?

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  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 31,383 Member
    Rowed bow in the double this morning, usual distance. Kind of windy, so we kept it moderate steady state, with a brief burst of extra power when we were passing another boat. (Since we're all facing backwards (toward the stern of the boat), it's a nice gesture after passing to make an effort to move a few boat lengths ahead so the trailing boat doesn't have to monitor distance between boats quite as anxiously.)

    Tonight, helped with learn to row class again. I did some boat-carrying, but mostly coxed a quad which is no particular physical effort but a bit of a psychological one, especially while trying to coach/instruct from the cox seat. Didn't help that it was windy. There were times when the new rowing learners weren't providing much momentum to the boat, so I didn't have much rudder control over our direction.

    Class overall was a bit of a madhouse, with quads and doubles of new rowers (usually with one experienced rower in each boat), the new folks still being pretty green and working on basic skills, including this being the first time they've had to carry boats.
  • laurachambers86
    laurachambers86 Posts: 152 Member
    @Djproulx amazing, I couldn't even dream of attempting what you've done!

    Yesterday was a full body workout in the gym first thing before work, a lot of focus on using my core as much as possible.

    Today was spinning at 7am, first time I've been in a good few weeks and my legs are definitely feeling it! Have also walked for about an hour in total.
  • Ernest_Nigma
    Ernest_Nigma Posts: 68 Member
    @Djproulx Great effort. I used to do some tris and running on sand, or trying to, can be brutal. I'm also very familiar with pushing on the bike and paying for it on the run! Way to hang in there! It's been a few too many years since my last tri though. You are inspiring!!

    This morning I warmed up on an elliptical for 15, then did some core work circuits for another 15, and some stretching after. There's an hour of dragon boat paddling practice scheduled for this evening, weather permitting.
  • SafariGalNYC
    SafariGalNYC Posts: 728 Member
    Vinyasa yoga over here!
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 31,383 Member
    Tuesday, just helping with the learn-to-row class, doing a little boat carrying but mostly just coxing. The only part of me that gets a workout from coxing is my shouting muscles (we don't have amplification for our coxes). Class last night similar, expecting similar tonight, though I may start rowing more myself during class as we move the class from quads (4-person boats that can take a cox) to doubles and singles.

    Yesterday morning, normal row in bow of the double, just under 7k, moderate steady state because we decided to work more on technique than conditioning. He was working on holding forward body angle longer during the drive (while the legs do the work), I was working on getting smoother puddles by pursuing a more stable blade path on the drive (towing the handle more than muscling it).

    Working with the class isn't a thing I calorie count as exercise, but it looks like I'm burning some extra. I'm still working on super-slowly creeping off the small Winter/holiday gain, and loss rate has picked up noticeably during these last couple of weeks.
    Djproulx wrote: »

    (snip)
    @Ernest_Nigma - I have a power meter on my bike, so I wasn't going into the run blind. I made a conscious decision to suffer on the bike and see what I had left on the run. Next month's race is a 70.3 distance event, so I'll be a bit more conservative on the bike, since I've walked a half marathon before, and didn't like it all that much, lol.

    (snip)

    @Djproulx (and @Ernest_Nigma), it seems like that's one of the many benefits of a training plan, or at least of certain kinds of training plans: One has an idea of what pace one can go for and sustain, or what pace is a small risk vs. a big one (i.e., risk of setting up a fly and die situation).

    At the time when I did some indoor races (rowing machine), I was luckily very well coached with a training plan that included that kind of information. I had a very clear target race pace that would be very uncomfortable to hold, but not quite completely impossible. That was the starting point pace. If I got into the last 500-ish meters and was holding well and feeling good, that was an indication I could take some risk in that last quarter of the race, and push hard while still hoping to finish no worse than close to target pace. That was really powerful knowledge, comparing with folks whose race plan was more like "go out as hard as I can and keep going".

    It sounds like you're thinking in similar ways, in a very different type of event, @djproulx.
  • Djproulx
    Djproulx Posts: 3,084 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »

    @Djproulx (and @Ernest_Nigma), it seems like that's one of the many benefits of a training plan, or at least of certain kinds of training plans: One has an idea of what pace one can go for and sustain, or what pace is a small risk vs. a big one (i.e., risk of setting up a fly and die situation).

    At the time when I did some indoor races (rowing machine), I was luckily very well coached with a training plan that included that kind of information. I had a very clear target race pace that would be very uncomfortable to hold, but not quite completely impossible. That was the starting point pace. If I got into the last 500-ish meters and was holding well and feeling good, that was an indication I could take some risk in that last quarter of the race, and push hard while still hoping to finish no worse than close to target pace. That was really powerful knowledge, comparing with folks whose race plan was more like "go out as hard as I can and keep going".

    It sounds like you're thinking in similar ways, in a very different type of event, @djproulx.

    @Ann, Agree with your observations.

    Re: First bolded comment - Yes, we spend quite a lot of time on this to understand what is possible on race day. And this means knowing whats possible in each of the 3 disciplines, given that you ride the bike after a swim, then run after a bike ride. There are also outside conditions that impact performance, heat, rain, course terrain, etc.

    Re: Second bolded comment - For the longer races, Half Iron (70.3 mile) and Full Iron (140.6 mile), my coach and I went back and forth verbally and in writing to produce a written "race plan" that established my base goal time( the most modest result that I needed to achieve to feel successful) the a stretch goal (say 10/15 minutes faster finish time over a 6 hour race(, and finally a BIG Stretch Goal (Best result I could imagine if all the stars aligned) This way, I wouldn't feel defeated several hours into the race if it was apparent that I could not hit the BIG Stretch Finishing Time Goal during a particular race. This was very helpful, since in long course triathlon there are really 5 disciplines: Swim, Bike, Run, Nutrition and Pacing. Lots of variables to manage, but we boiled it down to simple terms on race day. For example, on the bike I ONLY watched two numbers on my Garmin for a 112 mile Ironman bike split: Normalized Power: (155 watts) and Intensity Factor (.71). Did NOT look at speed or other riders, I just rode to my power number.

    Re: Third bolded comment: The "Go as Hard as you Can Approach" is a recipe for pain and failure in longer events. Even the elites have a strategy for when to push and WHEN NOT to push.
  • drmwc
    drmwc Posts: 962 Member
    edited June 2023
    The boat I've been diving off had compressor issues. They steamed from the
    Scillies to Penzance on Monday evening to get a replacement under warranty. That was successful, so we have had filled bottles ever since.

    Tuesday
    We dived the Plympton and Hatha; two wrecks at right angles.
    Second dive was a reef; it was kind of stunning.

    Wednesday
    3 dive day! This is unusual for the UK.
    We did:
    The Italia, a truly stunning wreck.
    A seal dive. We got a bit a seal action, but not too much.
    The Colossus, a very broken up historical wreck.

    Thursday
    We dived Tremanemanemamine (spelling nailed. Probably.) in the morning. It was stunning; really nice reefs with loads of anemone and nudibranch.

    We tried to do the MiniHaHa in the afternoon, but failed to find it so had a reef dive instead.

    I went bouldering later in the afternoon, finding an ultra-exposed stunning set of boulders.
  • Djproulx
    Djproulx Posts: 3,084 Member
    Nice afternoon to ride my usual weekday loop. Went out for 57 minutes at a 16.2mph moving average. Good to be back in the saddle.
  • mrmota70
    mrmota70 Posts: 522 Member
    Have knocked out 20 miles of runs outdoor and indoor between Mon-Thurs. Will likely do an early morning 10k tomorrow before the heat crawls up. The humidity has been unrelenting this week. It’s been manageable if done early before the sun starts the beat down.
  • Ernest_Nigma
    Ernest_Nigma Posts: 68 Member
    edited June 2023
    A half hour elliptical warm up and 15 minutes core exercise circuits this morning.
    Got to the pool for about a half hour of swimming this evening. Just easy though as I'm trying to get back into it.

    Dragon boat paddling was canceled last night. The wind and light rain might have been ok but there was a tornado warning for the area too. There were pictures of several different small ones, but no damage reported and I didn't see any.

    @AnnPT77 I agree with what you and @Djproulx are saying about pacing. Like him, I've done long course triathlons and pacing, based on the course and weather, etc., can be a real art. And, not so much for long course, but for short course triathlon especially, training for efficient transitions between the sports is like another event as well. Lots of time to gain or lose there too.
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 31,383 Member
    Actually rowed in the learn to row class tonight, sitting stroke in a quad because one of my friends was coxing for the first time ever (so I in stroke was right in front of her, facing her, could help her if needed). We did two different boatings, 3 experienced people, one in cox, one in stroke (me) and one in two seat. That put 2 new learners right behind (able to see) an experienced rower as we rowed . . . verrrryyyy slooowlllyyy, trying to be good models for them to follow. Not much of a serious workout, but very fun and rewarding. It's always good for me to go over basics - good value technically.
  • DiscusTank5
    DiscusTank5 Posts: 321 Member
    [quote
    - For the longer races, Half Iron (70.3 mile) and Full Iron (140.6 mile), my coach and I went back and forth verbally and in writing to produce a written "race plan" that established my base goal time( the most modest result that I needed to achieve to feel successful) the a stretch goal (say 10/15 minutes faster finish time over a 6 hour race(, and finally a BIG Stretch Goal (Best result I could imagine if all the stars aligned) . . . since in long course triathlon there are really 5 disciplines: Swim, Bike, Run, Nutrition and Pacing. . . . For example, on the bike I ONLY watched two numbers on my Garmin for a 112 mile Ironman bike split: Normalized Power: (155 watts) and Intensity Factor (.71). Did NOT look at speed or other riders, I just rode to my power number.
    [/quote]
    @Djproulx , this paragraph has answered some questions I haven't asked on here but have been wondering about as I consider going to a longer Tri distance next spring. Thank you!
  • DiscusTank5
    DiscusTank5 Posts: 321 Member
    Like him, I've done long course triathlons and pacing, based on the course and weather, etc., can be a real art. And, not so much for long course, but for short course triathlon especially, training for efficient transitions between the sports is like another event as well. Lots of time to gain or lose there too.

    Don't I know it!! Ask me (or rather, don't) about my 8 minute TI in last year's sprint tri. All I can say is that race (the Ozark Valley Triathlon) included a 200 m. run uphill straight out of the water to the bike area in their transition. That was the worst part of the race, IMHO.

  • DiscusTank5
    DiscusTank5 Posts: 321 Member
    30 min. run this morning in humid conditions. Also some walking to cool down (ha!--not possible in 83% humidity).

    36 min. bike outside yesterday, with another half hour of "water aerobics" ie, jogging in place or treading water while keeping up with my autistic 15 year old at our local outdoor pool.

    My regular Wednesday indoor pool swim got cancelled when the lifeguard didn't show up. To be fair, we had had a severe thunderstorm an hour before. I got in 40 min. on the elliptical and some strength training at the gym instead, and a couple minutes of running to my car in the rain while holding a towel over my head when another storm blew in right as I was leaving.
  • laurachambers86
    laurachambers86 Posts: 152 Member
    Full body workout today, lots of different varieties of squats and dumbbell work. Keeping the dumbbell weights low (only 3kg) as my tennis elbow still isn't 100%.

    Also managed a walk and 30 minutes of yoga stretches this evening.

    I don't know how you guys cope with such high humidity and heat, we've had it for a couple of weeks in the UK and it's knocked all my energy out of me!
  • Djproulx
    Djproulx Posts: 3,084 Member
    Like him, I've done long course triathlons and pacing, based on the course and weather, etc., can be a real art. And, not so much for long course, but for short course triathlon especially, training for efficient transitions between the sports is like another event as well. Lots of time to gain or lose there too.

    Don't I know it!! Ask me (or rather, don't) about my 8 minute TI in last year's sprint tri. All I can say is that race (the Ozark Valley Triathlon) included a 200 m. run uphill straight out of the water to the bike area in their transition. That was the worst part of the race, IMHO.

    As @Ernest_Nigma mentioned, transition times at the Sprint distance can be the key to your overall age group placement. Every Second Is Precious! There are lots of little things that make a difference: Wetsuit stripped as you run from the swim to T1, Helmet and shades upside down on aerobars for easy placement on head (practice this 30 times in a row just before race start to create an automatic response when you get out of the water) . Don't wear socks! Too much wasted time putting them on. Bike shoes mounted on clips and held in place with elastic - Leave transition running barefoot, do a running mount onto bike, then pedal with your bare feet on top of the shoes. Slide feet into shoes once you're underway. In T2, take helmet off, attach your race bib/belt, then slide feet into running shoes and use speed laces to simply pull them tight. Small water bottle in 1 shoe, so you can drink and eat a gel as you run out of transition.

    As you get practiced, this process becomes a routine. That's what's needed to be fast in/out of transition. Once I hit the timing mat, my goal is to spend less than 1 minute in T1 and same in T2. A typical race would be :52 in T1 and :48-:50 in T2.

    Glad to discuss via PM if you have questions.