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Teacher says Pop Tarts are not a healthy snack

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  • shor0814shor0814 Member, Premium Posts: 559 Member Member, Premium Posts: 559 Member
    shor0814 wrote: »
    brower47 wrote: »
    brower47 wrote: »
    I think I'm more disturbed by the fact that he's been sitting there hungry and afraid to be judged for not eating healthy food.

    Who wants their child to be afraid to eat and go hungry? This is how food disorders begin.

    But if he took something within the rules he wouldn't be afraid or hungry, correct? It seems like you are perpetuating the problem rather than solving it.

    Whenever I encounter something I believe is an injustice, I like to stick my head in the sand in order to prevent creating any waves too.

    Injustice? ::laugh::

    What was your question? Are you unsure of the definition of the word?

    Here you go:

    An unjust or unfair act; wrong.

    Yep. A teacher asking a child to follow rules does not fit that description.

    From the OP's previous posts it seems that "healthy" is not actually part of the rules. I believe the restrictions were nuts and seafood (really? seafood? Or did they really mean shellfish and not know the difference).

    From the OP: He came home yesterday saying he couldn"t bring his Pop tart for their morning snack, because they can only have "healthy snacks".

    From the OP's later post:
    They sent a note saying we had to provide two snacks plus lunch for the child.

    I didnt see anything specifying what was an acceptable healthy snack item. We just cant send nuts, or seafood.

    To define "healthy" is nearly impossible and is not the call of an individual teacher.
  • BrianSharpeBrianSharpe Member Posts: 9,097 Member Member Posts: 9,097 Member
    Giving your kids pop tarts is a form of child abuse....... B)
  • glassyoglassyo Member Posts: 5,690 Member Member Posts: 5,690 Member
    glassyo wrote: »
    Nope. Not okay. That teacher with one day has just undone your years of hard work in trying to teach your kid that there are no good or bad foods. Kids are like sponges and they take everything personally, he's not going to see that the teacher was being a not-nice person, he's going to see that he has bad food. And it's going to take a lot of consistent effort on your part and on his (when he figures it out for himself) that foods don't get labels like that unless - you're right - they're medically or ethically unsound FOR EACH INDIVIDUAL. (I'm all het up over this. Sorry.) If I were you I would have gone immediately to the principal because shenanigans.

    Also, did they send you out a guideline at the beginning of the school year as to what constitutes a healthy or unhealthy snack? Is it in writing that the kids can only have fruit/yogurt/granola?

    Sounds to me like teacher just didn't want to deal with your child on a sugar high, which if I were the parent would be unacceptable. You don't tell my kid what's good or bad when it comes to food, I do.

    They need to provide that guideline for all parents in writing or they need to stfu.

    (not that I'm mad about this at all... :# )

    Do you need a pop tart? :)

    Maybe a snickers ;)

    Dammit! If this hadn't been a pop tart thread, I totally would have made that connection. :)

  • Tallawah_Tallawah_ Member Posts: 2,410 Member Member Posts: 2,410 Member
    Sorry...technically you are correct but you're picking the wrong fight for a trivial gain. Health messages are indeed complex (we argue about it enough round here) and I'm not sure I'd want my teacher using up valuable teaching time to deliver such complexity to a class of children. If they go down that road they then have to explain (to multiple other kids and their not so well educated parents) what constitutes a 'balanced diet', 'occasional snack' etc...not something you'd want them to get into without a trained nutrionist to hand.
  • Need2Exerc1seNeed2Exerc1se Member Posts: 13,580 Member Member Posts: 13,580 Member
    shor0814 wrote: »
    shor0814 wrote: »
    brower47 wrote: »
    brower47 wrote: »
    I think I'm more disturbed by the fact that he's been sitting there hungry and afraid to be judged for not eating healthy food.

    Who wants their child to be afraid to eat and go hungry? This is how food disorders begin.

    But if he took something within the rules he wouldn't be afraid or hungry, correct? It seems like you are perpetuating the problem rather than solving it.

    Whenever I encounter something I believe is an injustice, I like to stick my head in the sand in order to prevent creating any waves too.

    Injustice? ::laugh::

    What was your question? Are you unsure of the definition of the word?

    Here you go:

    An unjust or unfair act; wrong.

    Yep. A teacher asking a child to follow rules does not fit that description.

    From the OP's previous posts it seems that "healthy" is not actually part of the rules. I believe the restrictions were nuts and seafood (really? seafood? Or did they really mean shellfish and not know the difference).

    From the OP: He came home yesterday saying he couldn"t bring his Pop tart for their morning snack, because they can only have "healthy snacks".

    From the OP's later post:
    They sent a note saying we had to provide two snacks plus lunch for the child.

    I didnt see anything specifying what was an acceptable healthy snack item. We just cant send nuts, or seafood.

    To define "healthy" is nearly impossible and is not the call of an individual teacher.

    Um, yeah it could be. But that has nothing to do whether a child being asked to bring a healthy snack instead of a pop-tart is an injustice. I mean come on, get serious.
    edited January 2017
  • cessi0909cessi0909 Member Posts: 654 Member Member Posts: 654 Member
    everher wrote: »
    I don't think the "only healthy snacks" rule is too unusual. I have heard of similar rules at schools down here.

    I think the teacher could have handled it differently though. This seems like a conversation that should've taken place between the teacher and you not the teacher and your son.

    I agree with this. Our kids school also requests healthy, non-smelly (ok ok it was MY kid who kept bringing sardines - he loves them), non-messy snacks and I am fine with it. I normally pack them a less "healthy" snack for after school and everyone is happy. Plus, my kids do get a little more wound up when they eat refined sugary items so I get why they teacher doesn't want it.

    But, that said, the teacher should have waited and addressed this with you and let your kiddo just eat his snack that day

  • shor0814shor0814 Member, Premium Posts: 559 Member Member, Premium Posts: 559 Member
    shor0814 wrote: »
    shor0814 wrote: »
    brower47 wrote: »
    brower47 wrote: »
    I think I'm more disturbed by the fact that he's been sitting there hungry and afraid to be judged for not eating healthy food.

    Who wants their child to be afraid to eat and go hungry? This is how food disorders begin.

    But if he took something within the rules he wouldn't be afraid or hungry, correct? It seems like you are perpetuating the problem rather than solving it.

    Whenever I encounter something I believe is an injustice, I like to stick my head in the sand in order to prevent creating any waves too.

    Injustice? ::laugh::

    What was your question? Are you unsure of the definition of the word?

    Here you go:

    An unjust or unfair act; wrong.

    Yep. A teacher asking a child to follow rules does not fit that description.

    From the OP's previous posts it seems that "healthy" is not actually part of the rules. I believe the restrictions were nuts and seafood (really? seafood? Or did they really mean shellfish and not know the difference).

    From the OP: He came home yesterday saying he couldn"t bring his Pop tart for their morning snack, because they can only have "healthy snacks".

    From the OP's later post:
    They sent a note saying we had to provide two snacks plus lunch for the child.

    I didnt see anything specifying what was an acceptable healthy snack item. We just cant send nuts, or seafood.

    To define "healthy" is nearly impossible and is not the call of an individual teacher.

    Um, yeah it could be. But that has nothing to do whether a child being asked to bring a healthy snack instead of a pop-tart is an injustice. I mean come on, get serious.

    Injustice isn't a good word to describe the problem I agree. I was talking about the "rules" that are not in place.

  • HardyGirl4EverHardyGirl4Ever Member, Premium Posts: 1,289 Member Member, Premium Posts: 1,289 Member
    There were pop tarts a plenty back in my day. But that was the '80s when fruit roll ups were considered a healthy snack.
    I do not think it's up to the teacher unless they are a certified dietitian or work with one.
  • hawkmancodyhawkmancody Member Posts: 63 Member Member Posts: 63 Member
    There is 16 g of sugar in a cherry poptart. And 4.5 g sugar per oz of grapes. So 1 poptart is equal to not quit 4 oz of grapes. That's like what 10-15 grapes if even that many. Sure grapes have other vitamins but still both can be in a good diet. Besides sugar is sugar doesn't matter if you get it from a soda or fruit it all becomes the same thing.
  • AlabasterVerveAlabasterVerve Member Posts: 3,172 Member Member Posts: 3,172 Member
    We need "trained nutritionists" to teach kids what a balanced diet is? "Non-nutrition professionals" aren't qualified to determine/enforce a healthy snack rule?

    Crazy times.
  • fattothinmumfattothinmum Member Posts: 218 Member Member Posts: 218 Member
    It's part of life that we don't agree with everything. The teacher is trying to introduce healthy eating habits. Nothing wrong with that. Our school removes unhealthy snacks and fizzy juice from the kids. I don't agree with that as we paid for it, but accepted it. I'd supply the healthy snack so my kids fit in at school with their peers. If they want junk, they can have some later at home.

    We can be as outraged as we like, but how it affects our kids is what's important. I sucked it up for their sake and now that I'm used to it, I appreciate it's one helping of fruit and veg a day I don't have to worry about.

    My kids fit in and don't feel awkward, though now they're old enough they go to a shop outside school with all their pals for hotdogs at lunch. The school is trying to instil healthy eating and that's a good thing, as for many kids, it's likely the only time of day they eat anything healthy.
  • elphie754elphie754 Member Posts: 7,571 Member Member Posts: 7,571 Member
    This actually makes me a bit nervous. I have severe food allergies to the point that we can't have anything I am allergic to in the house. Immoregnant right now and baby has a 50/50 shot of also having my allergies. Even if she doesn't have my allergies, mine are so severe that we still have have it in the house and going to have to make it very very clear that my daughter can only eat what I pack for her and CANNOT share food or eat anything the schools provides.

    If they make a huge issue from that or tell her she can't eat something I packed for her, they are going to regret it. Technically severefood allergies can be classified as a disability and I will pursue that if need.
  • NeuronsNeuronsNeuronsNeuronsNeuronsNeurons Member Posts: 83 Member Member Posts: 83 Member
    This title sounds like it would be a headline at The Onion.

    lol, my favorite Onion piece: "Multiple Stab Wounds May Be Harmful To Monkeys" . Is there anything more political than food? It touches socio-economics, religion, gender, cultural backgrounds, environmental concerns, health and wellbeing, education, etc. I think this could be the most politically charged subject in the world.
    edited January 2017
  • extra_mediumextra_medium Member Posts: 1,524 Member Member Posts: 1,524 Member
    I went to my kids school this morning, to speak with his first grade teacher.
    He came home yesterday saying he couldn"t bring his Pop tart for their morning snack, because they can only have "healthy snacks".

    I was upset. I still am even after speaking with the teacher this morning.
    I teach my child that there are no good or bad foods, unless you have a allergy or ethically cant eat it.

    He has been sitting there afraid to pull out his "unhealthy snack" because its not "fruit, or granola bar, or yogurt"(healthy snacks").
    I often send those as well.

    I told her not to teach my child about foods being good or bad, because I dont subscribe to that.

    Teacher: "So you're ok with him having a sugary Pop Tart in the morning"?
    Me: Yes, I if send it its good enough for him to have. Just so you know there are granola bars with just as much or more sugar in them as Pop Tarts.
    Teacher: blank stare.

    Do teachers have the right to teach children sugary snacks are unhealthy?

    Are Pop tarts the devil?

    I think you are missing the reason.
    I too have a 7 year old and we have rules for snacks.

    -- Everyone brings in something healthy, so the kids can't trade.
    -- Too much sugar means its harder to control the kids.
    "Just so you know there are granola bars with just as much or more sugar in them as Pop Tarts." --- Can you prove it?

    The problem is "healthy" is subjective, and included on the acceptable list are yogurt and granola bars, which would be an issue if they were really concerned about sugar. Look at a Nature Valley nutrition label - 18g sugar vs a Pop-Tart with 14g.

    Not that I think we need to be teaching kids that sugar is the devil, but its not useful at all to teach them that some foods are "good" and some are "bad" while they are nutritionally just about the same thing, just in different packaging.
    edited January 2017
  • PackerjohnPackerjohn Member Posts: 4,855 Member Member Posts: 4,855 Member
    elphie754 wrote: »
    This actually makes me a bit nervous. I have severe food allergies to the point that we can't have anything I am allergic to in the house. Immoregnant right now and baby has a 50/50 shot of also having my allergies. Even if she doesn't have my allergies, mine are so severe that we still have have it in the house and going to have to make it very very clear that my daughter can only eat what I pack for her and CANNOT share food or eat anything the schools provides.

    If they make a huge issue from that or tell her she can't eat something I packed for her, they are going to regret it. Technically severefood allergies can be classified as a disability and I will pursue that if need.

    If the baby would have issues by the time school rolls aroind it would be your responsibility to discuss with the school beforehand and resolve. The administration aren't mind readers.
  • Rocknut53Rocknut53 Member Posts: 1,793 Member Member Posts: 1,793 Member
    At my grandkid's schools in Wyoming, the kids were required a few times a year to bring boxes of snacks such as granola bars, crackers, etc. and the teachers would divvy them out for snack time. That way there was no trading because everyone had the same snack. And, theoretically, the snacks were "healthy." And if there was a specific kid that had allergies all the parents were made aware of that and to choose snacks accordingly.
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