Coronavirus prep

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Replies

  • ReenieHJ
    ReenieHJ Posts: 9,511 Member
    Goldthistime....hope you're on the tail end of it and everybody else in your family stays well!
    It sounds like you have a good plan for keeping it contained.

    It's kind of strange how it can affect people so differently. We were video-chatting with our ds and his gf last night. She said a couple she knows has had it. The dh just felt very tired for a week but the wife got pneumonia(both are recovering), I wonder if our immunity protects us from developing it one way or another? It must.
  • bmeadows380
    bmeadows380 Posts: 3,098 Member
    PAV8888 wrote: »
    If concerned, contributions to the https://archive.org/about/ and the wayback machine may be useful!
    https://archive.org/web/

    I love the waybackmachine! I've been able to resurrect several websites (I read amateur fiction and many of those sites have gone defunct when geocities went down). Though even the machine seems to be losing some things; there have been a few old links that I can't find at all.
  • Chef_Barbell
    Chef_Barbell Posts: 6,372 Member
    ReenieHJ wrote: »
    Every day at 7pm EST... there is cheering out of the windows across NYC for the essential workers. It's touching and chokes me up. <3
    I love that!!

    WTH is up with your disagree-er?? Does someone have too much time on their hands or very irritated with the way of things now?? Go find something NICE to do. :/
    And as far as the total number of disagree-ers through-out this whole thread, go have a damn cookie. Or something.

    Folks have nothing better to do...stuck inside and all. 🤷🏼‍♀️🤦🏼‍♀️
  • mkculs13
    mkculs13 Posts: 494 Member
    Cursive triggers muscle memory and builds different neural pathways than "memorizing" alone. I can "carry the one" in my head for a few numbers if I am air-writing with my index finger. I have noticed lately that ability is less intact than when I was young--it was very reliable. I don't know if that is simply some type of age-related decline or failure to use the skill for many years. I had always, always been an excellent speller when writing--until the first time I went to write on a board as a teacher. I could not spell easily. Lots of practice since then means I am strong at spelling at the board now.

    That does not mean that we "need" cursive, because other things work just as well. Typing the same word over and over would probably have the same effect as writing it; we just don't ask kids to do that anymore and we teach them instead to use spell checkers. Getting kids to check the dictionary meaning of a suggested word is a new skill and one which kids generally skip if they are just trying to get through an assignment. That's why we get "defiantly" when the student clearly means "definitely." But there have always been students who hurry through work, and that's a whole 'nother conversation.

    With the learning power of the human brain and the limit of hours in a day, we seem to prefer--as a species--dropping old skills in favor of new ones. In grad school, I went through the process of learning to write at a keyboard after an entire education-through college--of drafting everything by hand and having it perfect before I typed it. Word processing programs made the revision process much easier than the literal cutting and pasting I did before, but I had to work at getting the creative process going when typing vs. writing in cursive.

    As a teacher and historian, I have never thought that cursive changed that much; 17th-century script--when well-written--has been as accessible to me as 20th-century. The same with medieval manuscripts; I can easily recognize letters. Spelling and language are much bigger impediments to my comprehension. And having seen the VERY wide range of cursive among students in the 20th century when cursive was taught, I think that individual style, more than changing conventions for cursive, are what makes reading cursive difficult. And I thank god that students who have struggled with cursive and impenetrable handwriting have access to keyboards. Many children--boys in particular--learned to hate school b/c their teachers were not kind about their handwriting, and when when has fine motor deficits, no amount of scolding is going to fix it.
  • lemurcat2
    lemurcat2 Posts: 7,870 Member
    I was thinking of holding out one more week, when I'll probably be getting low on dairy too, and then go to see what I can find. I'd been thinking about getting ham of some kind for my home-alone Easter, but from some of the posts on here, it sounds like I might be overly optimistic. Maybe I'll find some canned or frozen pineapple and I can open a can of Spam (spiced ham in a can) and see what I can make out of it.

    It really depends where you live. Early on here we were low on paper products and pasta or other dried goods in some places, and dairy in others, but never in meat. And for us things are largely back to normal in the stores now (based on my one trip plus reports on NextDoor).
  • lemurcat2
    lemurcat2 Posts: 7,870 Member
    ReenieHJ wrote: »
    Every day at 7pm EST... there is cheering out of the windows across NYC for the essential workers. It's touching and chokes me up. <3
    I love that!!

    WTH is up with your disagree-er?? Does someone have too much time on their hands or very irritated with the way of things now?? Go find something NICE to do. :/
    And as far as the total number of disagree-ers through-out this whole thread, go have a damn cookie. Or something.

    Folks have nothing better to do...stuck inside and all. 🤷🏼‍♀️🤦🏼‍♀️

    And it could be an accident.