Coronavirus prep

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  • T1DCarnivoreRunner
    T1DCarnivoreRunner Posts: 11,462 Member
    My best friend is really upset with her employer right now. She has been going into work because of difficulties setting her to up work from home. They make them take their temperature everyday before coming into work. She has bad allergies, and springtime is the worst, and Friday, her temp was up to 100 degrees due to what she knew was nothing more than a sinus infection that she gets every year due to allergies. She debated on telling the employer, but finally felt honesty was right. All they heard was her temp was up and sent her home, telling her she has to self quarantine for 2 weeks. She contacted her doctor on the phone; he ordered a flu test and a COVID test. Talking with him, he also agreed it was highly unlikely she had COVID - she does have very bad lungs and is a prime candidate for the pneumonia if she does get it. Besides, she doesn't have a cough, she doesn't have body aches, and she doesn't have tightness in her chest.

    The flu test came back negative; the COVID test is supposed to be back in 4 to 12 days as lab corp is backed up (and I thought they had a rapid test now? Guess it's not in WV). However, her employer told her that it does not matter if the test comes back negative; she still has to stay self quarantined until she shows no other symptoms - no fever, no shortness of breath. Except she always has shortness of breath due to bad asthma and the allergies! AND they are making her take vacation time for this 2 week period!

    She says she'll have to lie when the 2 weeks is up just so she can do her job and get her paycheck.

    Usually, she's really behind her company and pointing out how it is better than the utility I work for (she works for the other power utility in the state); this time, however, my corporation actually put into place a better policy than hers has, because my utility is paying straight time for anyone who has to self-quarantine and cannot work from home, and sick leave automatically goes into place for the entire time one needs to be home with the illness until they test negative and are released by their doctor.

    I get her frustration, but people with allergies aren't immune to COVID-19. It's possible that her fever could be due to the virus. The alternative is to expect her co-workers to accept the risk of possible transmission and that's a lot to ask of people right now.

    Agreed. After all, she does have some symptoms at this point regardless. Maybe those symptoms are just allergies, or maybe not. Either way, it is a big risk for others.

    And as @busyPK said, she might be able to get some benefit from the gov. assistance program without having to use up vacation.
  • cwolfman13
    cwolfman13 Posts: 40,888 Member
    edited April 2020
    ReenieHJ wrote: »
    I have a question............where is the logic of shutting down certain aisles in stores such as WalMart? I'm sure their reasoning is sound, but everybody I've talked with says the same thing. Now they're going to be shoving more people into less room/ Unless they're also limiting number of consumers? And toys? I know adults are on the prowl for new and different things to do; wouldn't it make sense kids might be getting ultra bored too? Wouldn't buying toys be as essential as, oh say,....stocking up on soda, chips, or something?

    No disagreeing necessary, just asking a question for opinions. :)

    They aren't doing that here...but my guess would be to curb "joy shopping" and people just getting out of the house to browse around Wal-Mart and such.

    What they're doing here as of 8 AM this morning is limiting the number of people in the store to 20% of capacity which means if you need to go get something it's probably actually going to be an essential need because you'll likely be waiting in a line outside the store to get in. I haven't seen much of an issue in regards to large numbers of people when I go to the regular grocery store or even Costco, but I've driven by the Walmart parking lot a few times and it looks like the week before Christmas or something, so I was kind of expecting these people limits to come down the pipe.

    I have also heard complaints from other non-essential retailers that it isn't fair that they have to shut down, but Walmart and Target can continue to sell those "non-essential" items.

    ETA: I kinda get that, but at the same time not. Both of my boys have had a growth spurt and need new shoes...we can't go to the shoe store we normally would as it is non-essential, so we'll have to go to Target or something. If they were forbidden from selling this stuff, my kids would have to run around shoeless for the foreseeable future.
  • lemurcat2
    lemurcat2 Posts: 7,870 Member
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    What they're doing here as of 8 AM this morning is limiting the number of people in the store to 20% of capacity which means if you need to go get something it's probably actually going to be an essential need because you'll likely be waiting in a line outside the store to get in.

    That's basically what they've been doing at larger stores here (and even many smaller, as they are legally limited in how many people can be in at a time) since about a week or more before we got our stay at home order. Someone at the door will be checking off people as they go in and out. For the most part I don't think there have been actual lines to get in around me (I haven't seen any), but I've also avoided like the plague (bad turn of phrase, I suppose) stores like Costco, where I figured the crowds would be worst, and I never go to Walmart anyway, and there aren't even any big box Walmarts anywhere close. Could be that in the closest areas where they are located they do have lines. I've heard anecdotally of lines at some TJ's, but didn't see any at my local grocery when I went by and friends who have been to the local Mariano's and closest TJ's have reported no lines (and not too many people).

    A friend went to Walgreen's yesterday and said there weren't many people there and nearly all were wearing masks.
  • janejellyroll
    janejellyroll Posts: 25,878 Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    What they're doing here as of 8 AM this morning is limiting the number of people in the store to 20% of capacity which means if you need to go get something it's probably actually going to be an essential need because you'll likely be waiting in a line outside the store to get in.

    That's basically what they've been doing at larger stores here (and even many smaller, as they are legally limited in how many people can be in at a time) since about a week or more before we got our stay at home order. Someone at the door will be checking off people as they go in and out. For the most part I don't think there have been actual lines to get in around me (I haven't seen any), but I've also avoided like the plague (bad turn of phrase, I suppose) stores like Costco, where I figured the crowds would be worst, and I never go to Walmart anyway, and there aren't even any big box Walmarts anywhere close. Could be that in the closest areas where they are located they do have lines. I've heard anecdotally of lines at some TJ's, but didn't see any at my local grocery when I went by and friends who have been to the local Mariano's and closest TJ's have reported no lines (and not too many people).

    A friend went to Walgreen's yesterday and said there weren't many people there and nearly all were wearing masks.

    This was the system when I went to Target on Saturday and there was no line. I will note that it didn't really help because the capacity limit is based on the total square footage of the store and all the shoppers seemed to be in the grocery/home essentials section of the store so it was still much more crowded than would be ideal for a 6-foot distance between shoppers.
  • bmeadows380
    bmeadows380 Posts: 3,098 Member
    My best friend is really upset with her employer right now. She has been going into work because of difficulties setting her to up work from home. They make them take their temperature everyday before coming into work. She has bad allergies, and springtime is the worst, and Friday, her temp was up to 100 degrees due to what she knew was nothing more than a sinus infection that she gets every year due to allergies. She debated on telling the employer, but finally felt honesty was right. All they heard was her temp was up and sent her home, telling her she has to self quarantine for 2 weeks. She contacted her doctor on the phone; he ordered a flu test and a COVID test. Talking with him, he also agreed it was highly unlikely she had COVID - she does have very bad lungs and is a prime candidate for the pneumonia if she does get it. Besides, she doesn't have a cough, she doesn't have body aches, and she doesn't have tightness in her chest.

    The flu test came back negative; the COVID test is supposed to be back in 4 to 12 days as lab corp is backed up (and I thought they had a rapid test now? Guess it's not in WV). However, her employer told her that it does not matter if the test comes back negative; she still has to stay self quarantined until she shows no other symptoms - no fever, no shortness of breath. Except she always has shortness of breath due to bad asthma and the allergies! AND they are making her take vacation time for this 2 week period!

    She says she'll have to lie when the 2 weeks is up just so she can do her job and get her paycheck.

    Usually, she's really behind her company and pointing out how it is better than the utility I work for (she works for the other power utility in the state); this time, however, my corporation actually put into place a better policy than hers has, because my utility is paying straight time for anyone who has to self-quarantine and cannot work from home, and sick leave automatically goes into place for the entire time one needs to be home with the illness until they test negative and are released by their doctor.

    I get her frustration, but people with allergies aren't immune to COVID-19. It's possible that her fever could be due to the virus. The alternative is to expect her co-workers to accept the risk of possible transmission and that's a lot to ask of people right now.

    She's well aware that she's not immune; in fact, she's much more susceptible due to her weak lungs. But the thing is, all she has is a fever; none of the other symptoms are present - she does not have a cough, chills, body aches, sore throat, headache, or shortness of breath that are on the list as symptoms of COVID-19. There are a ton of things that can cause a mild fever in a human being. I wouldn't immediately jump to a conclusion that its COVID-19 if all I had is one symptom, especially if her doctor also agrees that its not the virus.
  • bmeadows380
    bmeadows380 Posts: 3,098 Member
    busyPK wrote: »
    @rheddmobile

    They aren't making her take sick leave; they are making her take vacation time--sick leave wouldn't have upset her nearly as much; its forcing her to use up all her vacation time for the year that has her angry, and I don't blame her for it.

    And trust me, this girl catches everything coming and going and ends up severely sick just about every time. If she gets COVID-19, she will get a severe case - she is definitely one of the vulnerable people they warn about it, especially as she's been dealing with medical issues for the last 2 years, so she's worn down now as it is physically.

    My question is, if you don't have any of the symptoms and also test negative, why should you still assume you may have it? what is the point of testing or publishing symptom lists, then? How would we ever rule out anyone having it and make it safe for them to be in public?

    Is she in the US? If so, she should read about the FFCRA. If her employer meets the guidelines set in it, they must pay her while she self-quarantines (employer receives the money back from the government).
    https://www.dol.gov/agencies/whd/pandemic/ffcra-employer-paid-leave

    thank you for this! I"ll forward it to her. Hopefully, she can at least salvage her vacation time.
  • missysippy930
    missysippy930 Posts: 2,547 Member
    My best friend is really upset with her employer right now. She has been going into work because of difficulties setting her to up work from home. They make them take their temperature everyday before coming into work. She has bad allergies, and springtime is the worst, and Friday, her temp was up to 100 degrees due to what she knew was nothing more than a sinus infection that she gets every year due to allergies. She debated on telling the employer, but finally felt honesty was right. All they heard was her temp was up and sent her home, telling her she has to self quarantine for 2 weeks. She contacted her doctor on the phone; he ordered a flu test and a COVID test. Talking with him, he also agreed it was highly unlikely she had COVID - she does have very bad lungs and is a prime candidate for the pneumonia if she does get it. Besides, she doesn't have a cough, she doesn't have body aches, and she doesn't have tightness in her chest.

    The flu test came back negative; the COVID test is supposed to be back in 4 to 12 days as lab corp is backed up (and I thought they had a rapid test now? Guess it's not in WV). However, her employer told her that it does not matter if the test comes back negative; she still has to stay self quarantined until she shows no other symptoms - no fever, no shortness of breath. Except she always has shortness of breath due to bad asthma and the allergies! AND they are making her take vacation time for this 2 week period!

    She says she'll have to lie when the 2 weeks is up just so she can do her job and get her paycheck.

    Usually, she's really behind her company and pointing out how it is better than the utility I work for (she works for the other power utility in the state); this time, however, my corporation actually put into place a better policy than hers has, because my utility is paying straight time for anyone who has to self-quarantine and cannot work from home, and sick leave automatically goes into place for the entire time one needs to be home with the illness until they test negative and are released by their doctor.

    I get her frustration, but people with allergies aren't immune to COVID-19. It's possible that her fever could be due to the virus. The alternative is to expect her co-workers to accept the risk of possible transmission and that's a lot to ask of people right now.

    She's well aware that she's not immune; in fact, she's much more susceptible due to her weak lungs. But the thing is, all she has is a fever; none of the other symptoms are present - she does not have a cough, chills, body aches, sore throat, headache, or shortness of breath that are on the list as symptoms of COVID-19. There are a ton of things that can cause a mild fever in a human being. I wouldn't immediately jump to a conclusion that its COVID-19 if all I had is one symptom, especially if her doctor also agrees that its not the virus.

    I know it depends on the state, but any chance she could collect unemployment or use sick days/PTO?
  • autumnblade75
    autumnblade75 Posts: 1,657 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    SmallMimi wrote: »
    @earlnabby

    I have also been told that using a non woven lining in between the two fabric layers is best. I had some fusible interfacing and made mask using higher thread count fabrics. Sheets are a great idea, I have some 600 count sheets I have been saving to use as drop cloths. Now we just need to be able to find elastic which would be easier than making my own bias tape for ties. Local stores have been sold out of Bias tape, elastic, shoe laces, etc, for weeks and online stores are projecting that they cannot ship until May.

    Thank you for taking care of your local Humane Society!

    Maybe you already know this, but in case not: If you end up needing to make bias tape, look up one of the very many sites on the web that explain how to make continuous bias strip from a square of fabric. Much, much easier that way. Still mildly a pain, though. :neutral:

    There is absolutely no reason to cut strips for mask ties on the bias. I HAVE ordered a bias tape maker, because it should simplify my life over folding the sides into the middle with my fingers and ironing. I am definitely not fiddling with bias cut fabric in this quantity, though. I'll let you know how that works out sometime in May. Between the 7th and 29th.
  • T1DCarnivoreRunner
    T1DCarnivoreRunner Posts: 11,462 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    pinuplove wrote: »
    COGypsy wrote: »
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    ReenieHJ wrote: »
    I have a question............where is the logic of shutting down certain aisles in stores such as WalMart? I'm sure their reasoning is sound, but everybody I've talked with says the same thing. Now they're going to be shoving more people into less room/ Unless they're also limiting number of consumers? And toys? I know adults are on the prowl for new and different things to do; wouldn't it make sense kids might be getting ultra bored too? Wouldn't buying toys be as essential as, oh say,....stocking up on soda, chips, or something?

    No disagreeing necessary, just asking a question for opinions. :)

    They aren't doing that here...but my guess would be to curb "joy shopping" and people just getting out of the house to browse around Wal-Mart and such.

    What they're doing here as of 8 AM this morning is limiting the number of people in the store to 20% of capacity which means if you need to go get something it's probably actually going to be an essential need because you'll likely be waiting in a line outside the store to get in. I haven't seen much of an issue in regards to large numbers of people when I go to the regular grocery store or even Costco, but I've driven by the Walmart parking lot a few times and it looks like the week before Christmas or something, so I was kind of expecting these people limits to come down the pipe.

    I have also heard complaints from other non-essential retailers that it isn't fair that they have to shut down, but Walmart and Target can continue to sell those "non-essential" items.

    I'm reasonably sure that "joy shopping" can't be stopped. I seriously spent probably fifteen or twenty minutes looking at baby/kid clothes at Target last week, just to have something to do. I don't have kids. I don't even know anyone who has kids. But it was there, it was retail and it wasn't my *kitten* apartment. Today is going to be liquor store day and I can't decide whether I should walk or drive so I can bring more home. I am also extremely likely to examine every bottle of wine and spirits they have, just to kill an hour outside my prison. And hopefully find every clerk in the store to deeply discuss drink options with. I stay home for as long as I can stand it, but every chance I have to get out where actual living human people are is stretched out to the utmost justifiable limit. They can shut down whatever aisles they want, limit the numbers inside as much as they want, but for a lot of folks, that's our only connection with actual people and I will soak up every single second and then hoard the memory for days. Text and FaceTime are moderately adequate to try and connect, but there's nothing like the feeling of being around PEOPLE. And stores are just about the only places left that have PEOPLE in them.
    I'm isolating with my husband and two teenagers. I imagine isolating alone would be much harder and really feel for everyone in that situation. At least I have other people to interact with - even if they do annoy me occasionally; for the most part, we get along very well though. Plus we have the advantage of a yard and two outbuildings so we aren't stuck staring at each other all day.

    Lowe's appears to be the joy shopping destination in my town. I get it. The weather is perfect for gardening and all those home tasks they suddenly have time for. It's really defeating the purpose, though...

    This is just FTR, not to criticize anyone else or minimize their experience in any way at all. Humans are varied, and that variety is a wonderful thing about the world.

    Whether isolating alone is hard(er) is a very individual thing. I live alone, only shopped once since 3/13, talked to a neighbor one day from a long distance, and a friend similarly on another day, and that's my in-person social contact (other than "good afternoon" or a hand wave to strangers when out for a walk). Happy as a clam.

    I'd prefer more social contact, and usually get quite a bit more, but I'm fine in current circumstances, emotionally and as a practical matter. (I expect to be fine indefinitely unless/until I become severely ill, COVID or anything else.)

    I think personality/psychology makes a difference, mainly but not totally where people are in the introvert/extrovert space. Tendency toward anxiety, rumination, or catastrophizing, or the lack of that, is relevant, too, IMO. Logistics is also potentially an issue: Whether one has the resources (transport, money, other humans' help) to get what one needs (food, meds, etc.), and the physical mobility/health to do what's needful. The nature of one's leisure activities matters (e.g., does the person have solo hobbies that remain enjoyable, or ways to stay active if activity is part of mood regulation).

    I'm saying this based on observing friends in other social media (people whose personalities I'm quite familiar with), plus checking in occasionally on a FB group for "elder orphans" (those 55+ with no children, partner, siblings, parents or similar family to aid/support them - a group that existed long before the pandemic).

    Personally, I do have to ration my attention to that FB group (always, but especially now). I'm generally philosophical about risks, but reading too much catastrophizing/negativity is not my best plan for maintaining a positive attitude. (NB not everyone in the group has this negative outlook.)

    I do feel badly for anyone, especially those isolating solo, who really need more social contact for happiness. I hope they'll find a way to meet up with friends someplace in an empty parking lot to shout at one another at 15-foot distances while wearing masks, or something else that's voluntary by all parties, and keeps risks down for themselves and especially the larger public.

    I'm the same... I get plenty of interaction online or on the phone, or by email. I am WFH and do all of the above digitally for work or personal use. My in-person interactions since 3/16 have included shopping twice and laundromat once, and a few deliveries or seeing neighbors outside. All but 1 delivery were at a distance too (left for me or left and I opened the door and picked up, hollared "thank you" from 10+ feet away). I am just as fine with digital interaction.