Welcome to Debate Club! Please be aware that this is a space for respectful debate, and that your ideas will be challenged here. Please remember to critique the argument, not the author.

What are your unpopular opinions about health / fitness?

1157158160162163358

Replies

  • VintageFeline
    VintageFeline Posts: 6,771 Member
    earlnabby wrote: »
    mmapags wrote: »
    mmapags wrote: »
    Is it a jelly roll, a jelly doughnut, or a Bismark?
    Do you drink from a drinking fountain, a water fountain, or a bubbler?
    Do you eat subs, hoagies, or grinders?
    Of course, there is the ultimate: soda or pop? (or Coke, or tonic)


    ...and this is why humans will never be able to communicate whatsoever.

    Bismarks are those chocolate covered donuts with pudding inside. It's my favorite.

    dd21RS.jpg
    1. Water fountain
    2. Sub
    3. Coke

    I can't even cite regional differences. I've lived in PA, FL, CA, WA. Not sure when or where I came up with these beliefs. It's my feels.

    Lol! The chef in me is having a cringe moment. That is not pudding in a Bismark. It is Creme' Patisserie. It's my foodie OCD kicking in I know... :D

    Is it in a choux bun? So sort of a giant profiterole/missing its top religieuses?

    Exactly! You never cease to impress!! ;)

    I did have to ask Google how to spell the latter. But yeah, I'm a foodie with a penchant for baking. Mind you, never made choux pastry, or bake a lot these days for that matter. Because I just don't have the calories to eat whole cake!

    Seriously???? Pate'a Choux is one of the easiest things to make: 1 c. water, 1 stick butter, heat until the water boils and butter is melted. Dump 1 cup flour and a pinch of salt all at once and stir until it forms a ball. Take off heat for about 5 minutes and then add 4 eggs, one at a time, stirring after each addition. Voila'.

    I never said it was hard, just that I'd yet to bother doing it.
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    I never made pasta salad with mayo. I always used vinaigrette.

    Yeah, that's the same with me.
  • cmriverside
    cmriverside Posts: 32,615 Member
    I don't use any of the MFP exercise entries, only ones I enter myself.

    Isn't boat speed determined in knots?
  • earlnabby
    earlnabby Posts: 8,177 Member
    earlnabby wrote: »
    mmapags wrote: »
    mmapags wrote: »
    Is it a jelly roll, a jelly doughnut, or a Bismark?
    Do you drink from a drinking fountain, a water fountain, or a bubbler?
    Do you eat subs, hoagies, or grinders?
    Of course, there is the ultimate: soda or pop? (or Coke, or tonic)


    ...and this is why humans will never be able to communicate whatsoever.

    Bismarks are those chocolate covered donuts with pudding inside. It's my favorite.

    dd21RS.jpg
    1. Water fountain
    2. Sub
    3. Coke

    I can't even cite regional differences. I've lived in PA, FL, CA, WA. Not sure when or where I came up with these beliefs. It's my feels.

    Lol! The chef in me is having a cringe moment. That is not pudding in a Bismark. It is Creme' Patisserie. It's my foodie OCD kicking in I know... :D

    Is it in a choux bun? So sort of a giant profiterole/missing its top religieuses?

    Exactly! You never cease to impress!! ;)

    I did have to ask Google how to spell the latter. But yeah, I'm a foodie with a penchant for baking. Mind you, never made choux pastry, or bake a lot these days for that matter. Because I just don't have the calories to eat whole cake!

    Seriously???? Pate'a Choux is one of the easiest things to make: 1 c. water, 1 stick butter, heat until the water boils and butter is melted. Dump 1 cup flour and a pinch of salt all at once and stir until it forms a ball. Take off heat for about 5 minutes and then add 4 eggs, one at a time, stirring after each addition. Voila'.

    I never said it was hard, just that I'd yet to bother doing it.

    Sorry, didn't mean to disparage. It is my go-to when I need a fast dessert so I make it frequently either for profiteroles or some kind of filled dessert (custard usually but I will do pudding or whipped cream if it is all I have).
  • VintageFeline
    VintageFeline Posts: 6,771 Member
    I don't use any of the MFP exercise entries, only ones I enter myself.

    Isn't boat speed determined in knots?

    Man powered would be different to wind and/or motor I imagine. I'm not sure a human in a canoe could reach measurable knots. Or that that's the measure. I'm not a rower so I'm only applying my own logic, I could be wrong!
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 26,208 Member
    I don't use any of the MFP exercise entries, only ones I enter myself.

    Isn't boat speed determined in knots?

    I don't use those entries; I just complain about their stupidity.

    I can't speak to canoe boat speed, as I've only done recreational canoeing and backwoods canoe camping, which we measured in hours, days and/or miles. ;) I don't know how competitive canoeists do it.

    Rowers (the "long skinny boats like in the Olympics" type) think in pace, not speed . . . specifically minutes/seconds per 500 meters, expressed as "split".

    "What's your split? I can hold 2:00 over 2K, without current or wind." (That would give you an 8-minute time for a 2K race - pretty decent for a li'l ol' lady, laughably slow for elite. No, I can't hold 2:00 for 2K in a single. ;) I wish.).

    People ask me how fast a rowing shell goes, in mph . . . I always have to stop and do the arithmetic.

    This whole mindset explains why the Concept 2 rowing machine likes to tell you minutes/seconds per 500m. Rowers can always tell when amateurs have been on a gym's C2: Monitor is set on "calories", damper is set on 10. Well, those, plus the less-than-5-minutes random-length piece in memory, with about a 2:48 (or worse) split. ;)

    Now there's an unpopular opinion. Snide, too.
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 26,208 Member
    earlnabby wrote: »
    earlnabby wrote: »
    mmapags wrote: »
    mmapags wrote: »
    Is it a jelly roll, a jelly doughnut, or a Bismark?
    Do you drink from a drinking fountain, a water fountain, or a bubbler?
    Do you eat subs, hoagies, or grinders?
    Of course, there is the ultimate: soda or pop? (or Coke, or tonic)


    ...and this is why humans will never be able to communicate whatsoever.

    Bismarks are those chocolate covered donuts with pudding inside. It's my favorite.

    dd21RS.jpg
    1. Water fountain
    2. Sub
    3. Coke

    I can't even cite regional differences. I've lived in PA, FL, CA, WA. Not sure when or where I came up with these beliefs. It's my feels.

    Lol! The chef in me is having a cringe moment. That is not pudding in a Bismark. It is Creme' Patisserie. It's my foodie OCD kicking in I know... :D

    Is it in a choux bun? So sort of a giant profiterole/missing its top religieuses?

    Exactly! You never cease to impress!! ;)

    I did have to ask Google how to spell the latter. But yeah, I'm a foodie with a penchant for baking. Mind you, never made choux pastry, or bake a lot these days for that matter. Because I just don't have the calories to eat whole cake!

    Seriously???? Pate'a Choux is one of the easiest things to make: 1 c. water, 1 stick butter, heat until the water boils and butter is melted. Dump 1 cup flour and a pinch of salt all at once and stir until it forms a ball. Take off heat for about 5 minutes and then add 4 eggs, one at a time, stirring after each addition. Voila'.

    I never said it was hard, just that I'd yet to bother doing it.

    Sorry, didn't mean to disparage. It is my go-to when I need a fast dessert so I make it frequently either for profiteroles or some kind of filled dessert (custard usually but I will do pudding or whipped cream if it is all I have).

    Tends to especially much impress people who don't bake, too. There are a few things like that - filled choux pastry, scratch cheesecake, meringues, macaroons etc. - that mysteriously impress all out of proportion to how hard they are to make.

    Great to take to potlucks . . . or whatever you call them where you live. ;)
  • OliveGirl128
    OliveGirl128 Posts: 801 Member
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    Just "salad" in the US is usually lettuce or some other kind of uncooked greens as a base with various other vegetables on it, typically some kind of dressing, and maybe some other ingredients, but the greens are the base.

    There are other kinds of salad, but they are always preceded with a modifier to distinguish them: egg salad, potato salad, fruit salad, chicken salad, cucumber salad (regular salad often has cucumbers, though), so on.

    I'd actually forgotten jello salad was a thing, seems very '70s to me, although I recall having it still in the '80s. If someone was expecting a "salad" and got that, they'd be shocked, though.

    I really don't get "My grandparents ate "greens", but the more refined people called them vegetables. Then it started to be that people mixed up different vegetables together and called it salad. Next we started to add oil, and cheese, and bacon, and raisins, and apples, and .........."

    In my version of English, greens is a generic term for leaf based vegetables like spinach, kale, chard, collards, dandelion, turnip greens, arugula, endive, etc. (and I'd weirdly include leafy things that are not green, like radicchio).

    Vegetables are, well, vegetables, culinary use, not botanical. As a side dish, however, potatoes and corn are not vegetables even though they technically are, they are starches (or such is how I remember it from growing up). Classic American dinner I grew up with would have meat, starch (often potatoes or corn or bread), and vegetable (often canned). Salad could be the vegetable, but more often it was a starter or extra side with a more elaborate dinner. Jello could be the dessert. It was never considered a vegetable.

    Adding oil and vinegar and cheese and bacon and so on to a salad is not a new fangled thing, it's just a more elaborate thing (well, except for the dressing, commonly oil and vinegar, which any salad would normally have, but not other vegetable dishes, some which might involve multiple vegetables). More formal/fancy salads would have more extras -- think of Julia Child showing how to cook a salad nicoise or, of course, a classic caesar salad. Of course, we wouldn't have those at home when I was a kid -- we had romaine or spinach or iceberg plus cucumbers, carrots, celery, tomatoes, stuff like that.

    My family still shows up with all sorts of jello 'salads' at get togethers-my cousins standard dish is a Snicker's salad-crushed Snickers candy bars in pudding, apples and whipped cream. So freaking good!
  • cmriverside
    cmriverside Posts: 32,615 Member
    holy moly. I opened a can o' worms, eh? :lol:
  • mmapags
    mmapags Posts: 8,946 Member
    holy moly. I opened a can o' worms, eh? :lol:

    SEE WHAT YOU STARTED!! :D:D
  • Packerjohn
    Packerjohn Posts: 4,855 Member
    I don't use any of the MFP exercise entries, only ones I enter myself.

    Isn't boat speed determined in knots?

    Man powered would be different to wind and/or motor I imagine. I'm not sure a human in a canoe could reach measurable knots. Or that that's the measure. I'm not a rower so I'm only applying my own logic, I could be wrong!

    Knots are nautical miles per hour. A nautical mile is about 10-20% more than a statute (land) mile, so a human in a canoe could reach measurable knots.
  • HeliumIsNoble
    HeliumIsNoble Posts: 1,222 Member
    earlnabby wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    earlnabby wrote: »
    earlnabby wrote: »
    mmapags wrote: »
    mmapags wrote: »
    Is it a jelly roll, a jelly doughnut, or a Bismark?
    Do you drink from a drinking fountain, a water fountain, or a bubbler?
    Do you eat subs, hoagies, or grinders?
    Of course, there is the ultimate: soda or pop? (or Coke, or tonic)


    ...and this is why humans will never be able to communicate whatsoever.

    Bismarks are those chocolate covered donuts with pudding inside. It's my favorite.

    dd21RS.jpg
    1. Water fountain
    2. Sub
    3. Coke

    I can't even cite regional differences. I've lived in PA, FL, CA, WA. Not sure when or where I came up with these beliefs. It's my feels.

    Lol! The chef in me is having a cringe moment. That is not pudding in a Bismark. It is Creme' Patisserie. It's my foodie OCD kicking in I know... :D

    Is it in a choux bun? So sort of a giant profiterole/missing its top religieuses?

    Exactly! You never cease to impress!! ;)

    I did have to ask Google how to spell the latter. But yeah, I'm a foodie with a penchant for baking. Mind you, never made choux pastry, or bake a lot these days for that matter. Because I just don't have the calories to eat whole cake!

    Seriously???? Pate'a Choux is one of the easiest things to make: 1 c. water, 1 stick butter, heat until the water boils and butter is melted. Dump 1 cup flour and a pinch of salt all at once and stir until it forms a ball. Take off heat for about 5 minutes and then add 4 eggs, one at a time, stirring after each addition. Voila'.

    I never said it was hard, just that I'd yet to bother doing it.

    Sorry, didn't mean to disparage. It is my go-to when I need a fast dessert so I make it frequently either for profiteroles or some kind of filled dessert (custard usually but I will do pudding or whipped cream if it is all I have).

    Tends to especially much impress people who don't bake, too. There are a few things like that - filled choux pastry, scratch cheesecake, meringues, macaroons etc. - that mysteriously impress all out of proportion to how hard they are to make.

    Great to take to potlucks . . . or whatever you call them where you live. ;)

    Potlucks usually. A church I used to go to always called them "pitch-in's". According to the pastor, there were so many good cooks that there was no luck involved . . . there was always an abundance of good food.
    I think I would like that pastor.

  • mathjulz
    mathjulz Posts: 5,526 Member
    earlnabby wrote: »
    WinoGelato wrote: »
    earlnabby wrote: »
    earlnabby wrote: »
    earlnabby wrote: »
    J72FIT wrote: »
    J72FIT wrote: »
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    DamieBird wrote: »
    All of this dairy talk brings up an unpopular opinion that I have:
    I hate the very concept of alternative milks. Okay, I get it, if you have a medical reason and can't process dairy then use the almond/soy/cashew or whatever milk in your smoothie/coffee/cereal, etc. Or, get Lactiad. I've seen nothing that convinces me that they are healthier or better alternatives to plain ol' dairy. They may be lower calories, but that doesn't automatically make them more nutritious.
    +1. It's like when people say "I'm eating cauliflower pizza". IT AIN'T PIZZA if it's cauliflower.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png


    How about when people go on about a meatless lasagna.

    Ah, you mean a casserole.

    I'm Sicilian so that really offends me... lol!

    Even though the meatless sauce is still layered with sheets of pasta?

    Lol, still not lasagna...

    I'm in the UK and we don't use casserole as a descriptor for such a broad range of items as in the US (and certainly never for anything with pasta) so I don't know what else we'd call a pasta layered dish identical in every way to traditional lasagne save for the sauce. Just like pasta cooked with a sauce in the oven is pasta bake and not casserole which I think is what it would be called in the US (though I may be remembering that incorrectly).

    Just to add, I understand it's not a traditional dish but then there are lots of variations within many cultures. It's just the passage of time and natural progression.

    Not everyone in the US calls the same things casseroles. What you described would also be called a pasta bake around here. Casseroles are meat, veggies, noodles, and sauce made from condensed soup all mixed together and baked in a casserole dish . . . sometimes with a topping of crushed potato chips or french fried onions (think green bean casserole).

    Our neighbors just over the river to the west (aka Minnesotans) call a casserole a "hot dish".

    I (in the US) often call lasagna a casserole. Around here pretty much anything that is saucy and cooked in a casserole dish is a casserole dish is a casserole.

    Lasagna would not qualify then since it is made in a pan, not a casserole dish.

    It's not lasagna if you cook it in a casserole dish?

    Nope. It has to be flat and either square or rectangular (depending on the pan you use). Casserole dishes are bowls that you bake in and lasagna should not have a bowl shape.

    I'm not a huge casserole person but I'm confident my mom made a variety of them in a 9x13 Pyrex dish. I've never heard that a casserole dish was exclusively bowl shaped...

    The 9x13 is a glass baking dish. Casserole dishes are different (in my corner of the world).

    One thing I absolutely love doing is gathering information about regional English so this has been fun. What does your family or your region call certain things?

    These questions are rhetorical. I don't want to derail the thread further by actually having people answer.

    Is it a jelly roll, a jelly doughnut, or a Bismark?
    Do you drink from a drinking fountain, a water fountain, or a bubbler?
    Do you eat subs, hoagies, or grinders?
    Of course, there is the ultimate: soda or pop? (or Coke, or tonic)


    From the metropolitan area of northern Utah (as opposed to rural Utah, which seems to have different accent and way of speaking)

    Jelly donut or Bismark, either one.
    Drinking fountain or water fountain (though some people have told me a water fountain is the decorative landscaping thing)
    Subs (short for submarine, IIRC) or hoagie
    Soda, Soda Pop, or soft drink.

    I don't know if it's just me or standard to this area that we have a lot of "both" uses.
  • livingleanlivingclean
    livingleanlivingclean Posts: 11,755 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    earlnabby wrote: »
    earlnabby wrote: »
    mmapags wrote: »
    mmapags wrote: »
    Is it a jelly roll, a jelly doughnut, or a Bismark?
    Do you drink from a drinking fountain, a water fountain, or a bubbler?
    Do you eat subs, hoagies, or grinders?
    Of course, there is the ultimate: soda or pop? (or Coke, or tonic)


    ...and this is why humans will never be able to communicate whatsoever.

    Bismarks are those chocolate covered donuts with pudding inside. It's my favorite.

    dd21RS.jpg
    1. Water fountain
    2. Sub
    3. Coke

    I can't even cite regional differences. I've lived in PA, FL, CA, WA. Not sure when or where I came up with these beliefs. It's my feels.

    Lol! The chef in me is having a cringe moment. That is not pudding in a Bismark. It is Creme' Patisserie. It's my foodie OCD kicking in I know... :D

    Is it in a choux bun? So sort of a giant profiterole/missing its top religieuses?

    Exactly! You never cease to impress!! ;)

    I did have to ask Google how to spell the latter. But yeah, I'm a foodie with a penchant for baking. Mind you, never made choux pastry, or bake a lot these days for that matter. Because I just don't have the calories to eat whole cake!

    Seriously???? Pate'a Choux is one of the easiest things to make: 1 c. water, 1 stick butter, heat until the water boils and butter is melted. Dump 1 cup flour and a pinch of salt all at once and stir until it forms a ball. Take off heat for about 5 minutes and then add 4 eggs, one at a time, stirring after each addition. Voila'.

    I never said it was hard, just that I'd yet to bother doing it.

    Sorry, didn't mean to disparage. It is my go-to when I need a fast dessert so I make it frequently either for profiteroles or some kind of filled dessert (custard usually but I will do pudding or whipped cream if it is all I have).

    Tends to especially much impress people who don't bake, too. There are a few things like that - filled choux pastry, scratch cheesecake, meringues, macaroons etc. - that mysteriously impress all out of proportion to how hard they are to make.

    Great to take to potlucks . . . or whatever you call them where you live. ;)

    We're asked to "bring a plate". (it the expectation that said plate/bowl/platter contains food to share :D
This discussion has been closed.