Myfitnesspal

Message Boards General Health, Fitness and Diet
You are currently viewing the message boards in:

Coronavirus prep

1600601603605606619

Replies

  • hiparihipari Member, Premium Posts: 1,236 Member Member, Premium Posts: 1,236 Member
    @Antiopelle we seem to have similar rules and cultures. The doctor's note system for sick leaves that you described is a baseline, but many workplaces especially in office jobs waive that for first 3 days of sickness. My supermarket job required the note from day one, but it was enough to turn the note in upon your return to work.

    When covid started last year, healthcare providers and officials alike encouraged employers to start waiving the doctor's requirement and/or extending the 3-day rule because there was a large concern that we wouldn't have enough doctors and they have more important things to do than write notes for someone who only needs medical care for that note and could easily take a nap and buy cough drops without seeing a doctor first. We currently go on a case-by-case if someone needs more than 3 days, but my hard rule is that you need to bring in a note if it's more than 2 weeks. Not because I don't trust people, but because after 2 weeks the social security office starts covering sick leave salaries and the doctor's note is required when filing for the payment.
  • 33gail3333gail33 Member Posts: 885 Member Member Posts: 885 Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    Antiopelle wrote: »
    Wow, I'm a little bit baffled - and wiser - reading different approaches to sick days. In Belgium (closer to the rules in Finland apparently), it is very clear: you get x days of paid holidays (the legal minimum is 20 per year for a full time, most companies agree on more) and that's it. Those are for relaxing under the sun!
    If you are sick to the point you can't work, you need to see a doctor and he/she will determine how much time you will be off work. A formal note is written and you have to hand this over to your employer on the first day of illness, whether it is for one day (the 'sneezing with a bit of fever or sprained ankle and can't drive' kind of sickness), for three days, or for a few months alike. Very exceptionally, you can stay one day off work without a doctor's note, but that is - I think - one day a year and you will be on HR's radar if you do that.

    As for the covid vaccines: you will get time off to have the shot (you only need to report it to your manager) and if you have symptoms severe enough to prevent you from working, the same rule applies: see a doctor, which is the most sensible option imo.

    @hipari : I work in the same kind of environment as you do and I get it that you wanted to advocate for your staff and for yourself. I do believe it is a difference in culture and the nature of the job, indeed (although I know some very motivated McDo burger flippers, who follow in-company courses to advance in their careers :wink: ).

    Wow, this seems like it would be a huge waste of medical resources to have to go to a doctor for a single day off. not to mention, if someone is off feeling like **** the last thing they probably feel like doing is sitting around a doctor's office for half a day trying to get a note.

    This is my reaction too. Most people who are sick to the point they can't go to work/shouldn't go to work bc they might be contagious don't necessarily need to go to the doctor. I can't imagine having to provide my employer with a note.

    Where I work, sick days aren't really an issue, people don't abuse it, and generally speaking I don't think most adults get sick that often such that it would be an issue absent a chronic or serious type illness (that they may or may not want to talk to their employer about). How much paid leave they are required to get for that sort of thing is lower here, but many employers are going to be understanding/more lenient than the law requires, obviously.

    Re taking a day off by calling in sick, I think it's not uncommon for people to have to schedule a day off some set period in advance, officially, if it's vacation and not sick time, so I've heard of people calling in when they knew it wouldn't actually be a bad time for anyone else and bc they just felt they needed a day off or had something they needed to take care of come up. I'm lucky enough that if something like that comes up (emergency plumbing work needed, for example), I can just work from home and always could have, if there weren't something I needed to be there for at work (which of course there is at times), and I think for many of us that will be much more the case post covid than it was before.

    Same - I have never had to provide a sick note. Mind you we only "technically" have 3 sick days, but in reality we can take whatever we need. I was off for a week with labrynthitis last year, my coworker was off for 2 weeks for surgery, we don't have to provide a note. I remember asking about it when I first started there and had the flu for a few days or something, and they basically scoffed and said it wasn't needed.
    While I can see it being required for 3+ days, having to get a sick note if you are off for one day with a migraine or intestinal upset seems like a huge waste of time and resources.
  • cwolfman13cwolfman13 Member Posts: 39,404 Member Member Posts: 39,404 Member
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    Re: "Yeah, in my experience, that "use any excuse" thing is far from universal."

    Of course it's not universal. I haven't taken all (or even most of, or in some years more than a couple of days of) my vacation in forever and I never take sick days. But claiming no one games the system seems unrealistic. That said, I think many people planned time off in case of bad reactions (I know several people who planned time off in advance in case) and that doesn't say whether they had them or not (I do think plenty of people did have minor-ish bad reactions, including me, and I worked but didn't work out and I enjoy working out). But if I hadn't ended up having things I absolutely had to do on that Friday after, I would have taken it off.

    It's definitely not universal, but it most definitely happens. My organization consists of 135 people which is the smallest I've ever worked for. We strongly encouraged employees to take their sick time if they had it available on the days they received their shots just in case, and the vast majority did.

    We didn't have anywhere close to 1/3 or our organization call in after their shot saying that they weren't feeling well....that would have been about 44/45 people. As I recall, we've had about 10-12 that have said they didn't feel well enough to come to work...mostly headache and/or fatigue. I know of at least three that I would say it is about a 90% probability of being utter BS due to past history, but not enough there to actually do anything more than have them on a "watch close" list.

    I have to say though...I don't really understand the "martyrdom" of not using paid time off which is part of one's benefit package, especially if it's use it or lose it. I use mine...I try to keep a bank of 3 weeks vacation and 2 weeks of sick just incase something happens, but otherwise I have no qualms using a benefit that is part of my compensation package. We have a few people that rarely take any time off and it's easy to see that it wears them down...they would be better and more productive if they took some time off for themselves. I am impressed by people getting their stuff done, not necessarily by having a butt in a seat every single day.

    I don't understand this. Why would you expect people to call in and report on what their reaction was when the "vast majority" already scheduled sick leave "just in case" because your organization "strongly" encouraged them to? If I've scheduled sick leave ahead of time, whether it be for a medical appointment or to take care of a family member's health needs (acceptable use of sick leave at my organization), it would never cross my mind that I needed to call in and report any symptoms I might end up experiencing that day.

    Someone has their shot scheduled for 10AM on Tuesday and are pre-approved to take that day off just in case...doesn't matter if they have any reaction or not, that time is pre-approved just in case. Then let's say they call in "sick" on Wednesday and Thursday. All I'm saying is that some people will be legitimately feeling unwell...but some people also use it as a viable excuse to use their sick time even though they feel fine...ie they're lying about feeling unwell.

    1/3 of my organization didn't call in sick...that just seems like a lot of people to me and what I was responding to...33% of the workforce calling in sick.
  • kshama2001kshama2001 Member Posts: 24,277 Member Member Posts: 24,277 Member
    SModa61 wrote: »
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    SModa61 wrote: »
    I know shingles vaccine in US is different brand than we use in Australia - but I have given many shingles vaccines to people and nobody has reported much at all in way of side effects.

    @paperpudding I would swear I have read people saying that their shingles vaccine reaction was worse than their COVID. I hope that your observations are the reality.
    I'm not sure how many people have said that.

    It isn't my observation of patients here though ( we do use different brand to US,not sure if that matters)

    Here in the US we use Shingrix, which has more reports of reaction than the now discontinued in the US Zostavax.

    https://www.singlecare.com/blog/shingrix-vs-zostavax/
    Compared to Zostavax, Shingrix has been reported to cause more systemic reactions like headache, fever, muscle pain (myalgia), and fatigue.

    I am scheduled to have my second Shingrix shot in July. I'm very curious about my reaction because while I got really sick after my first shot, some or all of that may have been due to the Anaplasmosis I was diagnosed with later that month.

    @kshama2001 If you think of it, update me after your second shot. I have been debating that vaccine for a while because i am not sure I understand the risks to me if I don't take it. I have already had shingles at age 32, and then gave my son the chicken pox who gave it to his whole kindergarten class as well as his baby sister.
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    I'm at an age where I should get the shingles vaccine too, and I'm more intimidated to get it than the covid one (which I was excited and happy to get), and also don't feel the "do this for public health and so this nightmare can finally be over" pressure to do it ASAP. Also curious about how it goes, kshama. I really don't want shingles, granted!

    I'm scheduled to get it July 19. I will definitely remember to update if I have a bad reaction and will try to remember if I don't :)
  • kshama2001kshama2001 Member Posts: 24,277 Member Member Posts: 24,277 Member
    Antiopelle wrote: »
    Wow, I'm a little bit baffled - and wiser - reading different approaches to sick days. In Belgium (closer to the rules in Finland apparently), it is very clear: you get x days of paid holidays (the legal minimum is 20 per year for a full time, most companies agree on more) and that's it. Those are for relaxing under the sun!
    If you are sick to the point you can't work, you need to see a doctor and he/she will determine how much time you will be off work. A formal note is written and you have to hand this over to your employer on the first day of illness, whether it is for one day (the 'sneezing with a bit of fever or sprained ankle and can't drive' kind of sickness), for three days, or for a few months alike. Very exceptionally, you can stay one day off work without a doctor's note, but that is - I think - one day a year and you will be on HR's radar if you do that.

    As for the covid vaccines: you will get time off to have the shot (you only need to report it to your manager) and if you have symptoms severe enough to prevent you from working, the same rule applies: see a doctor, which is the most sensible option imo.

    @hipari : I work in the same kind of environment as you do and I get it that you wanted to advocate for your staff and for yourself. I do believe it is a difference in culture and the nature of the job, indeed (although I know some very motivated McDo burger flippers, who follow in-company courses to advance in their careers :wink: ).
    Wow, this seems like it would be a huge waste of medical resources to have to go to a doctor for a single day off. not to mention, if someone is off feeling like **** the last thing they probably feel like doing is sitting around a doctor's office for half a day trying to get a note. I'm in Canada and at my employer and any I've heard of, if you are off more than 3 in a row you need a note which seems reasonable (not sure if that is a Canada thing or if it varies by employer).

    I'm fortunate that where I work we are allowed 120 sick days per year - yes - 120. I remember when I first got the job many, many years ago telling my parents about it and they literally did not believe me. I had to show them in writing and they just shook their heads. And yes, some people have taken every single one of those (but most people average less than 10).

    When I was in the military, we were required to go to Sick Call if we weren't going to show up for work. This was a very effective method of getting people to show up to work. I believe I took sick time just once in four years.

    By contrast, at my previous job, where I was a machine operator, the amount of sick time people took was staggering. And by "sick" I mean "too hungover to work."

    When we got paid on Fridays at lunch time, a number of people would not return after lunch. (This was in the 80s before direct deposit was widespread.) So they moved payday to Thursday at lunch, which made things worse - that group would take Thursday afternoon off, as well as all day Friday. Then they moved it to Wednesday, which did improve matters. (Probably we got paid at lunch so people could go to the bank while it was open.)

    Back to the military - while we certainly did have our share of partiers, especially in Okinawa, due to the Sick Call policy people did make it in to work far more often than they would have without it.

    After the military I started working in white collar jobs. I'm not remembering the specific details of sick and personal time at the liberal arts college, but it was very generous. Possibly we needed to see a doctor if we were out for more than three days. However, my coworkers and I were hardly ever out sick.
    edited June 9
  • lynn_glenmontlynn_glenmont Member Posts: 8,867 Member Member Posts: 8,867 Member
    SModa61 wrote: »
    SModa61 wrote: »
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    SModa61 wrote: »
    I know shingles vaccine in US is different brand than we use in Australia - but I have given many shingles vaccines to people and nobody has reported much at all in way of side effects.

    @paperpudding I would swear I have read people saying that their shingles vaccine reaction was worse than their COVID. I hope that your observations are the reality.
    I'm not sure how many people have said that.

    It isn't my observation of patients here though ( we do use different brand to US,not sure if that matters)

    Here in the US we use Shingrix, which has more reports of reaction than the now discontinued in the US Zostavax.

    https://www.singlecare.com/blog/shingrix-vs-zostavax/
    Compared to Zostavax, Shingrix has been reported to cause more systemic reactions like headache, fever, muscle pain (myalgia), and fatigue.

    I am scheduled to have my second Shingrix shot in July. I'm very curious about my reaction because while I got really sick after my first shot, some or all of that may have been due to the Anaplasmosis I was diagnosed with later that month.

    @kshama2001 If you think of it, update me after your second shot. I have been debating that vaccine for a while because i am not sure I understand the risks to me if I don't take it. I have already had shingles at age 32, and then gave my son the chicken pox who gave it to his whole kindergarten class as well as his baby sister.

    You can get shingles more than once. And now your son and his whole kindergarten class and his baby sister can get it when they grow up.

    I am hoping that I am misinterpreting your words, but it feels like you are stating I did something wrong at the time that then jeopardized others. I was 32. It was 1993. There was no shingles or chicken pox vaccines available at that time and certainly would not have been given to a 32 year old if it had been developed. That was just the reality of the times. My life was also such that I never was able to see a doctor for my mysterious condition. The shingles was diagnosed due to my son developing the chicken pox. By then, his classmates and sister were exposed as well. Unfortunate all around.

    @annpt77 Thanks for those details. I had forgotten about the nerve pain. I did have it for at least 10 years after and that pain was disturbing during those years. The shingles had only manifested in my left breast. Over the following years the pain would pop up randomly and would get my imagination going with concerns like breast cancer and such. I had forgotten about that until your comment since that after effect has been gone for years. I am sorry for what your friends went through. Sounds like I do need to get moving on starting the Shingles vaccination protocol.

    Yes, you're misinterpreting my words. You said you weren't sure you understood the risks if you didn't get the shingles vaccine, and then mentioned that you already had the shingles. I was pointing out one of the risks and that the fact you mentioned doesn't mitigate those risks. You can get it again. You can get it again a lot worse.
  • AntiopelleAntiopelle Member Posts: 852 Member Member Posts: 852 Member
    Antiopelle wrote: »
    Wow, I'm a little bit baffled - and wiser - reading different approaches to sick days. In Belgium (closer to the rules in Finland apparently), it is very clear: you get x days of paid holidays (the legal minimum is 20 per year for a full time, most companies agree on more) and that's it. Those are for relaxing under the sun!
    If you are sick to the point you can't work, you need to see a doctor and he/she will determine how much time you will be off work. A formal note is written and you have to hand this over to your employer on the first day of illness, whether it is for one day (the 'sneezing with a bit of fever or sprained ankle and can't drive' kind of sickness), for three days, or for a few months alike. Very exceptionally, you can stay one day off work without a doctor's note, but that is - I think - one day a year and you will be on HR's radar if you do that.

    As for the covid vaccines: you will get time off to have the shot (you only need to report it to your manager) and if you have symptoms severe enough to prevent you from working, the same rule applies: see a doctor, which is the most sensible option imo.

    @hipari : I work in the same kind of environment as you do and I get it that you wanted to advocate for your staff and for yourself. I do believe it is a difference in culture and the nature of the job, indeed (although I know some very motivated McDo burger flippers, who follow in-company courses to advance in their careers :wink: ).

    Wow, this seems like it would be a huge waste of medical resources to have to go to a doctor for a single day off. not to mention, if someone is off feeling like **** the last thing they probably feel like doing is sitting around a doctor's office for half a day trying to get a note. I'm in Canada and at my employer and any I've heard of, if you are off more than 3 in a row you need a note which seems reasonable (not sure if that is a Canada thing or if it varies by employer).

    I'm fortunate that where I work we are allowed 120 sick days per year - yes - 120. I remember when I first got the job many, many years ago telling my parents about it and they literally did not believe me. I had to show them in writing and they just shook their heads. And yes, some people have taken every single one of those (but most people average less than 10).

    A doctor's check for a 1 - 3 day note usually takes up 10 minutes. You go in, doctor checks you out, gives you the note and you're out again. If you really feel like crap, you can ask a doctor's visit at home. It is almost always a family GP who knows you and your file. I think it is a good system as it takes away the ambiguity away from the employer - employee relationship.

  • snowflake954snowflake954 Member Posts: 6,619 Member Member Posts: 6,619 Member
    bjptr31 wrote: »
    corona virus.... oh oh oh... be carefull

    THIS is a great idea!
  • GaleHawkinsGaleHawkins Member Posts: 8,097 Member Member Posts: 8,097 Member
    https://www.eatthis.com/covid-19-signs/

    Hair loss and Fatigue were two that jumped out in my experience.
Sign In or Register to comment.