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Coronavirus prep

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  • hiparihipari Member, Premium Posts: 1,272 Member Member, Premium Posts: 1,272 Member
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    I think adverse reactions are relatively rare. Everyone I know personally is fully vaccinated and not a single one of them had anything more than a sore arm like they would with any other shot.

    Judging by work hour logging at my workplace, roughly a third of all vaccinated employees have taken some sick leave (either partial day or a full day) after their vaccination. Based on that, I don’t think it’s ”rare”.
  • mockchocmockchoc Member Posts: 6,590 Member Member Posts: 6,590 Member
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    33gail33 wrote: »
    33gail33 wrote: »
    Has anyone got their second shot (Pfizer) and NOT had a bad reaction? I am getting mine on Saturday and everyone keeps telling me I am going to be sick from it.

    Also wondering if anyone has got their second shot at an extended interval yet - my first shot was three months ago. I think I am in the first cohort here to get the second shot on the extended time frame so not sure how that might influence the side effect situation.

    I heard some common reports of adverse reactions the day after the second shot and had planned to take it easy myself the day after my second shot. I got my shot at 7:30 in the morning, did a 90 minute bike ride afterwards, and some automotive work the rest of the day. The next day... nothing. No fever at all. My arm was barely even sore at the injection site. I ended up doing my normally planned long run (15 miles) for the day.

    My partner had a nasty headache the evening of her shot, and felt ill the next morning, but was feeling well enough to go out on her bike that afternoon.

    Got it 3 hours ago - so far so good. Didn't plan a whole lot for this weekend just in case.

    I think that you hear mostly the bad reactions but people don't tend to talk much about mild or non existent reactions. After posting here I see there is a range with the second shot and it isn't necessarily all bad - which was the impression I had before.

    I think adverse reactions are relatively rare. Everyone I know personally is fully vaccinated and not a single one of them had anything more than a sore arm like they would with any other shot.

    In many cases, I think symptomatic reactions are self induced...they believe it will happen, so it does...basically, power of suggestion. Early on in the vaccine process, we had an issue at one of our mass vaccination centers where several people started having issues during their 15 minute watch period and the site was temporarily shut down...it turns out they were just having anxiety and panic attacks.

    Totally agree. Just a sore arm as can happen with any vax. Yes I had a panic attack too lol. It was nothing.
  • AvidkeoAvidkeo Member, Premium Posts: 3,032 Member Member, Premium Posts: 3,032 Member
    hipari wrote: »
    Avidkeo wrote: »
    hipari wrote: »
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    I think adverse reactions are relatively rare. Everyone I know personally is fully vaccinated and not a single one of them had anything more than a sore arm like they would with any other shot.

    Judging by work hour logging at my workplace, roughly a third of all vaccinated employees have taken some sick leave (either partial day or a full day) after their vaccination. Based on that, I don’t think it’s ”rare”.
    hipari wrote: »
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    I think adverse reactions are relatively rare. Everyone I know personally is fully vaccinated and not a single one of them had anything more than a sore arm like they would with any other shot.

    Judging by work hour logging at my workplace, roughly a third of all vaccinated employees have taken some sick leave (either partial day or a full day) after their vaccination. Based on that, I don’t think it’s ”rare”.

    I'm going to jump in here and ask what your definition of adverse reactions are?

    Generally mild and common reactions are soreness and redness at the injection site, mild symptoms including fever, tiredness and even muscle aches. I know lots of people who experience these

    Adverse reactions are anaphylaxis, encephalitis, cardiac arrest. These are extremely rare.

    You and I seem to have a very different definition of ”adverse”. Mine is more in line with Merriam-Webster dictionary, thinking that adverse is opposed to one’s interests or causing harm. I’d say headaches, fevers and chills are opposed to most people’s interests and potentially causing harm if they prevent people from fulfilling whatever plans they had for that time.

    I would of course list the reactions you mentioned as adverse, but definitely on the more serious side and, thankfully, quite rare.
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    hipari wrote: »
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    I think adverse reactions are relatively rare. Everyone I know personally is fully vaccinated and not a single one of them had anything more than a sore arm like they would with any other shot.

    Judging by work hour logging at my workplace, roughly a third of all vaccinated employees have taken some sick leave (either partial day or a full day) after their vaccination. Based on that, I don’t think it’s ”rare”.

    I'm guessing that if we were able to see how many skipped a concert, wedding reception, ballgame or other "fun" event it would be a lot less than 1/3 skipping.

    All events, fun or otherwise, have been cancelled for over a year now. Of course I can never know for sure what my colleagues do during weekends, but they’re generally a very work-motivated bunch and I’ve heard multiple recommendations of scheduling the vax appointment for a Friday so a possible reaction doesn’t interfere with work plans.

    Well hopefully everyone has a mild reaction
    edited June 5
  • spiriteagle99spiriteagle99 Member Posts: 3,215 Member Member Posts: 3,215 Member
    I had Moderna #2 shot 46 hours ago and think most of my side effects to this side may be behind me which was mainly feeling tired.
    After first shot the side effects may have been more Covid-19 like but had passed after 22 hours leaving me stronger than any time in 2021.

    Ever if my sinus infection the first week of Jan 2021 masked Covid-19 at the time as my wife expected at the time I am glad I now have completed my 2 shot Covid-19 vaccination process and have physical proof because how much better I felt and still feel 24 hours after the 1st shot.

    Last Wednesday Cancer was ruled out as a cause of my blood issues for the past 5 months.

    Post vaccination side effects range from zero to death we read so I think comparing ours with others is without medical value.

    I'm glad they ruled out cancer, but did they get closer to figuring out what is causing your problem?
  • Theoldguy1Theoldguy1 Member Posts: 2,120 Member Member Posts: 2,120 Member
    hipari wrote: »
    Avidkeo wrote: »
    hipari wrote: »
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    I think adverse reactions are relatively rare. Everyone I know personally is fully vaccinated and not a single one of them had anything more than a sore arm like they would with any other shot.

    Judging by work hour logging at my workplace, roughly a third of all vaccinated employees have taken some sick leave (either partial day or a full day) after their vaccination. Based on that, I don’t think it’s ”rare”.
    hipari wrote: »
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    I think adverse reactions are relatively rare. Everyone I know personally is fully vaccinated and not a single one of them had anything more than a sore arm like they would with any other shot.

    Judging by work hour logging at my workplace, roughly a third of all vaccinated employees have taken some sick leave (either partial day or a full day) after their vaccination. Based on that, I don’t think it’s ”rare”.

    I'm going to jump in here and ask what your definition of adverse reactions are?

    Generally mild and common reactions are soreness and redness at the injection site, mild symptoms including fever, tiredness and even muscle aches. I know lots of people who experience these

    Adverse reactions are anaphylaxis, encephalitis, cardiac arrest. These are extremely rare.

    You and I seem to have a very different definition of ”adverse”. Mine is more in line with Merriam-Webster dictionary, thinking that adverse is opposed to one’s interests or causing harm. I’d say headaches, fevers and chills are opposed to most people’s interests and potentially causing harm if they prevent people from fulfilling whatever plans they had for that time.

    I would of course list the reactions you mentioned as adverse, but definitely on the more serious side and, thankfully, quite rare.
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    hipari wrote: »
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    I think adverse reactions are relatively rare. Everyone I know personally is fully vaccinated and not a single one of them had anything more than a sore arm like they would with any other shot.

    Judging by work hour logging at my workplace, roughly a third of all vaccinated employees have taken some sick leave (either partial day or a full day) after their vaccination. Based on that, I don’t think it’s ”rare”.

    I'm guessing that if we were able to see how many skipped a concert, wedding reception, ballgame or other "fun" event it would be a lot less than 1/3 skipping.

    All events, fun or otherwise, have been cancelled for over a year now. Of course I can never know for sure what my colleagues do during weekends, but they’re generally a very work-motivated bunch and I’ve heard multiple recommendations of scheduling the vax appointment for a Friday so a possible reaction doesn’t interfere with work plans.

    Or scheduling a vax appointment on Friday to start the weekend early.
  • FuzzipegFuzzipeg Member Posts: 2,159 Member Member Posts: 2,159 Member
    I hope the Delta variant does not make it to anywhere else. With science talk suggesting it is 40-60% more transmissible, effecting youngsters much more than previous ones, it still seems to be slowed by the vaccine so vaccinated persons don't become as ill as they would otherwise. Its the unvaccinated people who are still becoming more ill, needing hospital care. I understand the hesitance, I have not had a flu vaccine since the mid '80's, I had probably what I could call Long flu. When it came to this though. The probability of death, age and health predicted, I made the choice I did before when I said life with t4 only treatment for hashi was no life at all. I'd like to think when the time comes I'll be sitting on a star looking down on everyone in my life but please, please not yet there is too much for me to learn and know let alone do.

    When my daughter had her vaccine, I was very concerned for her, the type she was to have had carried the minute possibility of developing clots. The US don't use it. I told myself, back the few months ago, the medics were, had learned so much more, they knew what to do were this sad reaction to happen, how to treat the clots particularly if the person were sensitive to their changes in how they feel and raised the alarm in good time. We like millions more were fine, my daughter is well. I feel for those who are so very precious about their least discomfort, a pin prick and achy arm, you get that with all childhood vaccines, avoiding vaccination against the probability of not running the risk of discovering, when its too late that their encounter with covid has been more than life itself.
  • SModa61SModa61 Member Posts: 1,861 Member Member Posts: 1,861 Member
    @kimny72 What is odd is that I have not known anyone with significant COVID or vaccine issues until just these last two weeks. And I fully understand that each may be a coincidence. In the cases of the two very recent stories, one is Florida and the seizure one was Massachusetts treatment but they live and were vaccinated in Connecticut. I suggested they look into Vaers, but I could tell they were not interested in taking that step despite their beliefs and feelings.

    Was talking to my daughter a couple hours ago, and she pointed out to me that none of us know if doctors are reporting to Vaers while downplaying to the patient until more is known. Which I would fully understand.

    Edit: Just read the first part of your post @Kimny72 and last week I was reading an article stating pretty much exactly what you said. You covered the topic thoroughly!
    edited June 6
  • 33gail3333gail33 Member Posts: 1,000 Member Member Posts: 1,000 Member
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    33gail33 wrote: »
    33gail33 wrote: »
    Has anyone got their second shot (Pfizer) and NOT had a bad reaction? I am getting mine on Saturday and everyone keeps telling me I am going to be sick from it.

    Also wondering if anyone has got their second shot at an extended interval yet - my first shot was three months ago. I think I am in the first cohort here to get the second shot on the extended time frame so not sure how that might influence the side effect situation.

    I heard some common reports of adverse reactions the day after the second shot and had planned to take it easy myself the day after my second shot. I got my shot at 7:30 in the morning, did a 90 minute bike ride afterwards, and some automotive work the rest of the day. The next day... nothing. No fever at all. My arm was barely even sore at the injection site. I ended up doing my normally planned long run (15 miles) for the day.

    My partner had a nasty headache the evening of her shot, and felt ill the next morning, but was feeling well enough to go out on her bike that afternoon.

    Got it 3 hours ago - so far so good. Didn't plan a whole lot for this weekend just in case.

    I think that you hear mostly the bad reactions but people don't tend to talk much about mild or non existent reactions. After posting here I see there is a range with the second shot and it isn't necessarily all bad - which was the impression I had before.

    I think adverse reactions are relatively rare. Everyone I know personally is fully vaccinated and not a single one of them had anything more than a sore arm like they would with any other shot.

    In many cases, I think symptomatic reactions are self induced...they believe it will happen, so it does...basically, power of suggestion. Early on in the vaccine process, we had an issue at one of our mass vaccination centers where several people started having issues during their 15 minute watch period and the site was temporarily shut down...it turns out they were just having anxiety and panic attacks.

    Yeah my BIL works in public health and he said once the 12-17 year olds started getting vaccinated it slowed everything down in the clinics because they get a lot more fainters in that age group.

    Husband and I both did have mild reactions to the first shot - fatigue and headache for a day and a half. He seems to have had a bit of a worse reaction to our second one yesterday, fever and chills and body pain. I seem to be fine, no reaction of note at all this time.
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