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Coronavirus prep

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  • SModa61
    SModa61 Posts: 1,889 Member
    Apologies if this is a question that has been already covered, but I am wondering if anyone has stats for rate of "break through" infections vs second Covid infections. Basically, hubby and I are trying to assess the risk for my 82 year old vaccinated MIL by her being around a non-vaccinated person that tested positive for a COVID infection in May 2020. Is she really at more risk being with this person vs my husband and I, who are fully vaccinated with no known infection? My instinct is that it should be a draw, but I bet there is a more official answer. TIA
  • MargaretYakoda
    MargaretYakoda Posts: 1,943 Member
    SModa61 wrote: »
    Apologies if this is a question that has been already covered, but I am wondering if anyone has stats for rate of "break through" infections vs second Covid infections. Basically, hubby and I are trying to assess the risk for my 82 year old vaccinated MIL by her being around a non-vaccinated person that tested positive for a COVID infection in May 2020. Is she really at more risk being with this person vs my husband and I, who are fully vaccinated with no known infection? My instinct is that it should be a draw, but I bet there is a more official answer. TIA

    My husband is in his early 70’s and has some significant health challenges. He didn’t have much of a reaction to either his first or second COVID shot. I am assuming this means he didn’t produce many antibodies.
    So I am continuing to not allow him around anyone whose vaccine status is either unknown or has chosen not to be vaccinated.

    If your MIL didn’t have much of a reaction to the vaccine, I personally would advise the same.
  • callsitlikeiseeit
    callsitlikeiseeit Posts: 8,346 Member
    mph323 wrote: »
    I just saw this article in my newsfeed, and it's chilling how easily the delta variant spreads. I live in CA where we have a mask mandate for schools, and yet one teacher was able to spread the virus to half her class, and eventually a total of 26 children and adults. This happened in a small school about 60 miles away (Marin). The teacher was unvaccinated, went to class for two days while experiencing symptoms, and read to the class with her mask off both days. Otherwise she had her mask on per regulations. Every child in the front row tested positive, and most in the second row, as well as some others, and it spread from there.

    https://www.huffpost.com/entry/marin-california-elementary-unvaccinated-teacher-26-covid-19_n_61295b80e4b0231e369bd0bb

    i saw that story on the news last night i believe. :'(
  • ahoy_m8
    ahoy_m8 Posts: 2,548 Member
    SModa61 wrote: »
    Apologies if this is a question that has been already covered, but I am wondering if anyone has stats for rate of "break through" infections vs second Covid infections. Basically, hubby and I are trying to assess the risk for my 82 year old vaccinated MIL by her being around a non-vaccinated person that tested positive for a COVID infection in May 2020. Is she really at more risk being with this person vs my husband and I, who are fully vaccinated with no known infection? My instinct is that it should be a draw, but I bet there is a more official answer. TIA

    I share your curiosity. CDC is not collecting data on breakthrough infections (unless the breakthrough infection results in death or hospitalization, which because vaccines work, is small). Evidently some local/county health departments are. At best, data is incomplete.

    There is data on the percent of all covid hospitalizations & deaths attributable to vaccinated patients (https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2021/08/10/us/covid-breakthrough-infections-vaccines.html), but I have seen no data on the percent of vaccinated people who become infected, nor the percent of breakthrough infections resulting in hospitalization/death because the denominator (tot number of breakthroughs) is unknown.

    Has anyone seen a reinfection rate anywhere-- vaxxed or not? I'm interested in that, too.
  • mph323
    mph323 Posts: 3,563 Member
    edited August 28

    edit: sorry, quoted the wrong person, I meant to respond to @kshama2001 :(

    Fair enough. I changed the original to refer to countries rather than states. I really am trying to work out how this could ultimately play out in terms of lives lost vs. economic impact, meaning will all countries in the end have a similar outcome over the long haul?
  • T1DCarnivoreRunner
    T1DCarnivoreRunner Posts: 11,387 Member
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    It's actually easy here in Tx to get a booster. I was just talking to one of my friends yesterday morning about it (she is immuno compromised) and got her 2nd shot in Feb I think. She was able to walk right in to the pharmacy and get her booster yesterday afternoon. It will be interesting to see if she has any reaction to the 3rd. So far all reports I have heard are just arm soreness and nothing like the 2nd shot. She got Moderna I think. (and looks like that poster was quite successful in getting the other thread shut down).

    On another note maybe MORE people will be encouraged to and will be able to get the antibodies now that our Governor has made them more in the news again.

    I don't think that was a "booster". I think she got a regular shot which are widely available to walk into any pharmacy and get. So she got herself a third shot, but not necessarily a "booster". Per the CDC, boosters won't be available until the fall after full FDA approval (which happened yesterday August 23). From what I've read, these won't be just walk in and get...you will get a notification that you are eligible as per the date of your 2nd shot. It will go in the same order that the original shots were prioritized.

    This is per the CDC on 8/20/21...so not really sure what your friend got here...maybe it was a booster and they were just starting before the official announcement of FDA approval or something. I won't be eligible to get mine until Dec as my 2nd shot was April 2 per the CDC.

    I'm not sure how those notifications will work since that data isn't always in a single place (aside from the paper vaccine card).

    I got my 1st dose of Moderna in TN, then moved to TX and got my 2nd dose at a pharmacy here. In May, the county where I lived in TN called me wanting to know if I was going to schedule my 2nd shot. There is no single national / international database with all of those records for each individual.

    ETA: The original shots were also not prioritized in a uniform fashion. This was also a state decision. This is part of the reason I was able to get it in TN in March. I knew I would be moving soon and TX considered Type 1 Diabetics in the "healthy" group while TN put us in the "comorbidity" group. I agreed with TN and made sure to get my first when able. I got it the same week they opened it up to residents with 1 comorbidity. I was able to schedule a 2nd dose in TX only because I had already received my 1st dose.

    In my state, those records are held by our state DOH and we will be notified by our DOH when we are eligible and that record will have to be provided to the pharmacy. This is to avoid a run on vaccine and vaccine shortfalls. Our state is simply following the 8 month CDC guidance for when to send notifications. This keeps everyone in the same order as the first go around.

    That's great for people who got both doses in the same state and there are consistent records. For those of us who got our 2 doses in 2 different states, the systems you described functions to prevent me from ever receiving a booster.

    In your situation, someone here would simply contact the DOH and explain that they received their first two vaccines in another state which is easy for them to verify. If you have your vax card, even easier and then they just register you using the date of your 2nd shot. If you had your first shot somewhere else, and your 2nd shot in state, the DOH would have on record that you received your second dose here, so you would already be in the database and get your notification 8 months after the 2nd dose on record.

    Your vax card can also be used at the pharmacy here to indicate whether or not you're eligible for a booster as per the dates on the card.

    Yea, the vax card is the only thing that helps me. Both TN and TX each think I got a 1st dose and skipped the 2nd dose. Although I don't know that the state of TX actually has any records.
  • LiveOnceBeHappy
    LiveOnceBeHappy Posts: 85 Member
    jenilla1 wrote: »
    I still don't see how wearing a mask hurts the economy. We have to wear shirts and shoes when we go inside a business. What's one more item of clothing?

    Some people will choose to go to other businesses or states if they would be required to wear a mask.