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What are your unpopular opinions about health / fitness?

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Replies

  • stevencloser
    stevencloser Posts: 8,911 Member
    Anyone got a good American chili recipe? I think I'm gonna order some ancho chili, lol.
  • jdlobb
    jdlobb Posts: 1,232 Member
    Anyone got a good American chili recipe? I think I'm gonna order some ancho chili, lol.

    this is a really good one, and appropriately complex to make

    http://www.esquire.com/food-drink/food/recipes/a6171/texas-chili-recipe-ll-1208/
  • J72FIT
    J72FIT Posts: 5,937 Member
    NickleArse wrote: »
    a bulletproof coffee for breakfast (as part of a keto or LCHF diet) is an excellent way to lose weight

    How exactly...?
  • mph323
    mph323 Posts: 3,566 Member
    Just to add to the pasta discussion. I come from a small neighborhood in Queens, from parents who came from very limited food backgrounds and never had money to eat out. This would be our family definitions, I'm really sure not the same outside the family.

    Spaghetti - just spaghetti
    Macaroni - elbow macaroni, bow tie macaroni, corkscrew macaroni etc. (always specifically by shape). Except shells, which were just shells.
    Noodles - lasagna, chicken noodle soup and Chinese
    Pasta (never heard this until we moved to CA) - became bucket term for everything not noodles.

    I'll save the "kidney bean stuff" that eventually morphed into "sweet chili" for another time...
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 26,974 Member
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    jdlobb wrote: »
    @piperdown44
    I should tell my co-workers that I'm entering the chili contest with a chili made of fruit and seeds and record their reactions.

    If it has beans it's not chili. It's stew.

    If it doesn't have beans it's not chili, it's hot dog or pasta sauce.

    Texas chili has no beans in it.

    Texans do it wrong.

    This is the unpopular opinions thread. I personally don't discriminate against any chili.

    Neither do I. I love hot dog chili too. ;)

    Me too, I put both kinds on my hot dogs. ;)

    Have you had Cincinnati style?

    Is that with cinnamon?

    Or nutmeg, depending on which restaurant you go to.
    It's not an overwhelming flavor. Just a hint.
    The key to good Cincy chili is the texture.

    Some guy at a local chili cookoff made Cincinnati chili with cinnamon once. No idea how authentic it was, but I thought it was pretty good. I can't say I remember the texture at all. It was several years ago. He didn't win.

    He wouldn't, I think. Most people seem to prefer eating things that taste the same way that particular dish has always tasted in their world.

    This is the whole basis of the regional chili wars.
  • stevencloser
    stevencloser Posts: 8,911 Member
    jdlobb wrote: »
    Anyone got a good American chili recipe? I think I'm gonna order some ancho chili, lol.

    this is a really good one, and appropriately complex to make

    http://www.esquire.com/food-drink/food/recipes/a6171/texas-chili-recipe-ll-1208/

    Lots of stuff there I can't get and don't know how to substitute unfortunately.
  • NickleArse
    NickleArse Posts: 15 Member
    I should clarify all of this by saying I don't buy Asprey's proprietary ingredients to make my BP coffee, it's jsut espresso, butter and coconut oil
    jdlobb wrote: »

    whats the point of adding butter to the coffee? seems like unnecessary calories to me. coffee is just fine as-is.

    I've done keto diet with and without bullet proof coffee, I get a lot less of the negative side effects of keto when I consume BP coffee
    J72FIT wrote: »

    How exactly...?

    helps me hit super low calories (on keto) whilst still feeling super energetic
  • 3bambi3
    3bambi3 Posts: 1,650 Member
    NickleArse wrote: »
    I should clarify all of this by saying I don't buy Asprey's proprietary ingredients to make my BP coffee, it's jsut espresso, butter and coconut oil
    jdlobb wrote: »

    whats the point of adding butter to the coffee? seems like unnecessary calories to me. coffee is just fine as-is.

    I've done keto diet with and without bullet proof coffee, I get a lot less of the negative side effects of keto when I consume BP coffee
    J72FIT wrote: »

    How exactly...?

    helps me hit super low calories (on keto) whilst still feeling super energetic

    Bulletproof coffee helped you keep your calories low?
  • Ruatine
    Ruatine Posts: 3,424 Member
    jdlobb wrote: »
    Anyone got a good American chili recipe? I think I'm gonna order some ancho chili, lol.

    this is a really good one, and appropriately complex to make

    http://www.esquire.com/food-drink/food/recipes/a6171/texas-chili-recipe-ll-1208/

    Lots of stuff there I can't get and don't know how to substitute unfortunately.

    This is the one I have used that has beer and chocolate in it: https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/beer-chili-chocolate-the-end-come-and-get-it-98477866295.html. Nothing too crazy for ingredients other than the Mexican beer (which is a malty lager) and the corn flour.
  • piperdown44
    piperdown44 Posts: 958 Member
    CSARdiver wrote: »
    CSARdiver wrote: »
    I did not know people felt so passionately about beans in chili (or lack thereof). But whatever your preference at no point can you call it a stew. Or soup. WTF is that about!? And serving it with spaghetti? You over the ponders are a weird lot.

    As a Brit who experiences no regional variations of chili beyond are you fancy and put a bit of dark chocolate in and puts beans in if I have them and considers chili to be about the flavour more than anything (so I'm also cool with vegi varieties) I find this whole conversation entertaining. We probably break all kinds of rules though as it's most often served with rice here. Or loaded nachos.

    I am partial to a chili cheese dog when on your fine shores though.

    You just need to come back to the U.S. and go on a Chili Trail Pilgrimage. Or, better yet, a BBQ Trail Pilgrimage, if you want to see a real smackdown.

    For the record, although I happily eat any and all chili and BBQ, I favor a Virginia vinegar sauce over ribs or pulled pork (brisket is way down the list) and I will kick anyone's butt in a chili cook-off with my white chicken chili. The secret ingredient? Evil.

    I am so on board with a BBQ Trail Pilgrimage.

    One of these years, I am going to drive down Highway 61 from St. Louis to New Orleans, and I am going to eat all of the BBQ and listen to all the Delta Blues.

    We need to get all the Midwesterners together for a road trip.

    Okay, but we all have to meet in St. Louis, not Minnesota. Delta Blues > Dylan.

    Also, one of the stops has to be Lambert's Throwed Rolls Cafe in Sikeston, MO. It's not BBQ, but the local baseball team boys throw rolls at your head and expect you to catch them.

    Very familiar - Originally from St. Louis and most of our family is in the greater St. Louis metro area still.

    There are some amazing local pit masters cooking in the empty lots around U City & Dog Town. They cook Kansas City style which is just fantastic with the sorghum molasses base sauce you get around Southern IL & MO.

    When I was in 4th grade, my grandparents moved to the Ozarks, and we would always cross the river near Cairo and then stop at Boomland (a mecca for roadside Americana back then) and Lamberts. I always felt like I was getting somewhere once we hit that red dirt.

    Lamberts...home of the throwed roll!
    Got me a big Lambert's travel mug when I last there about 2 months ago.

  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    Bulletproof coffee would not work for me, since for me (not saying for anyone else) I like to have either nothing at all for breakfast (other than black coffee) or something that includes some vegetables. I try not to have meals that involve lots of calories and no vegetables.

    Also, and perhaps more importantly, I prefer black coffee, and the idea of oil and butter in coffee seems icky.
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 26,974 Member
    earlnabby wrote: »
    earlnabby wrote: »
    jdlobb wrote: »
    yes. Powered chili should be pure chili pepper, dried and ground. "Chili powder" should specifically be a powder for use in the prepared dish, "chili."

    and the oregano in it has to be Mexican oregano (sometimes called "wild marjoram"). Mediterranean oregano does not work with the chilis and cumin the same way.

    Here we have oregano and marjoram. It is not called wild though. Would it be what you call wild?

    Nope. Marjoram and Oregano are kissing cousins and are both members of the mint family. Mexican oregano (wild marjoram) is a completely different species unrelated to the mints. The botanical name is Lippia graveolens and it is actually related to verbena.

    In just to thank you for going to the Latin name - the only sane way to talk about plants.

    Maybe we need Latin names for stuff like pasta/noodles. ;)
  • VintageFeline
    VintageFeline Posts: 6,771 Member
    earlnabby wrote: »
    mmapags wrote: »
    earlnabby wrote: »
    earlnabby wrote: »
    earlnabby wrote: »
    jdlobb wrote: »
    Texas Chili competitions, the only ones that matter, will disqualify you for putting beans in a stew and calling it chili.

    I really don't care what the yankees up in Ohio do with their stews.

    IT'S NOT STEW! Ground beef does not a stew make.
    earlnabby wrote: »
    We have a restaurant locally called "Real Chili" and you can get your chili either over noodles (macaroni, not spaghetti), potatoes, or neither. Greasy spoon and a great place to stop after bar time.

    Again, noodles are not pasta, noodles are Asian, pasta is Italian and chili shouldn't be served with either. I'll let the potatoes pass.

    Around here, "noodles" is an all-encompassing term and includes Asian noodles, pasta, egg noodles, Spaetzle, etc.

    And was the cause of much confusion in my adolescent mind when watching US TV shows (mostly Friends TBH) when lasagne is being made but noodles being references. SO confused.

    I grew up in a small town with heavy German/Northern European influence so "noodles" usually meant wide egg noodles. As my horizons expanded, so did the things that were included as noodles. We made lasagna with lasagna noodles that were pasta. We made macaroni and cheese with noodles that were pasta. Many made schnitzel with a side of noodles that were Spaetzel.

    That seems very convoluted. Macaroni/lasagne sheets etc would be types/shapes of pasta. Now you're all throwing extraneous words into the mix.

    It's interesting that moving beyond a European grounding (where pasta is from) caused the calling of pasta to morph into noodles.

    Yup, it is convoluted but we all know what we are talking about. Kind of like the areas where someone asks for a "coke" and needs to specify if it is a Coke, Sprite, Dr. Pepper, etc.

    Might be the large number of Northern Europeans (German, Scandinavian, Polish, etc) who settled all over the area as opposed to southern Europe (Italy) who settled mostly in the one large city we have. As many say "all pasta is noodles, but not all noodles are pasta"

    It's interesting how the same immigrant population cause different language variations. Obviously in the UK we have all kinds of Europeans living here. But that's not an evolution we have. Funny thing to me is how many fish 'n chip shops are owned by Italians though!

    Weighing in as the son of Italian immigrants, it is all pasta by definition. The cut of pasta is the difference. While made the same, noodles are a northern European thing.

    What's the difference between pasta and noodles, besides geography?

    All pasta is noodles, but not all noodles are pasta.

    Still doesn't answer my question.

    Link I posted earlier.

    https://www.clearspring.co.uk/blogs/news/12237057-the-difference-between-noodles-pasta
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 26,974 Member
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    earlnabby wrote: »
    earlnabby wrote: »
    jdlobb wrote: »
    Texas Chili competitions, the only ones that matter, will disqualify you for putting beans in a stew and calling it chili.

    I really don't care what the yankees up in Ohio do with their stews.

    IT'S NOT STEW! Ground beef does not a stew make.
    earlnabby wrote: »
    We have a restaurant locally called "Real Chili" and you can get your chili either over noodles (macaroni, not spaghetti), potatoes, or neither. Greasy spoon and a great place to stop after bar time.

    Again, noodles are not pasta, noodles are Asian, pasta is Italian and chili shouldn't be served with either. I'll let the potatoes pass.

    Around here, "noodles" is an all-encompassing term and includes Asian noodles, pasta, egg noodles, Spaetzle, etc.

    And was the cause of much confusion in my adolescent mind when watching US TV shows (mostly Friends TBH) when lasagne is being made but noodles being references. SO confused.

    I grew up in a small town with heavy German/Northern European influence so "noodles" usually meant wide egg noodles. As my horizons expanded, so did the things that were included as noodles. We made lasagna with lasagna noodles that were pasta. We made macaroni and cheese with noodles that were pasta. Many made schnitzel with a side of noodles that were Spaetzel.

    That seems very convoluted. Macaroni/lasagne sheets etc would be types/shapes of pasta. Now you're all throwing extraneous words into the mix.

    It's interesting that moving beyond a European grounding (where pasta is from) caused the calling of pasta to morph into noodles.

    I actually think it's that a lot of Americans ran into noodles from a central European background first, and knew only a limited selection of pasta (which some apparently called macaroni in all forms, although we did not).

    When I was growing up, you had noodles, which were egg noodles, or spaghetti, or lasagne noodles. Pasta as a general term was not used. I don't recall noodles with Chinese food from when I was young, but later had it with Japanese food (nice restaurant in town was Japanese) and then was exposed to it (late high school) in Chinese and Thai.

    I now think of pasta as Italian and noodles as everything else, although I'd tend to agree that noodles is the generic.

    That said, chili shouldn't be put on spaghetti, that's a weird Cincinnati thing. (Joking, mostly.)

    Pretty close in the history points, for me, too (US Great Lakes region, rural). I'd add that the first people to start talking about "pasta" were perceived by some others as a little full of themselves and "fancy".
  • Need2Exerc1se
    Need2Exerc1se Posts: 13,577 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    jdlobb wrote: »
    @piperdown44
    I should tell my co-workers that I'm entering the chili contest with a chili made of fruit and seeds and record their reactions.

    If it has beans it's not chili. It's stew.

    If it doesn't have beans it's not chili, it's hot dog or pasta sauce.

    Texas chili has no beans in it.

    Texans do it wrong.

    This is the unpopular opinions thread. I personally don't discriminate against any chili.

    Neither do I. I love hot dog chili too. ;)

    Me too, I put both kinds on my hot dogs. ;)

    Have you had Cincinnati style?

    Is that with cinnamon?

    Or nutmeg, depending on which restaurant you go to.
    It's not an overwhelming flavor. Just a hint.
    The key to good Cincy chili is the texture.

    Some guy at a local chili cookoff made Cincinnati chili with cinnamon once. No idea how authentic it was, but I thought it was pretty good. I can't say I remember the texture at all. It was several years ago. He didn't win.

    He wouldn't, I think. Most people seem to prefer eating things that taste the same way that particular dish has always tasted in their world.

    This is the whole basis of the regional chili wars.

    I suppose that's true. Chili is serious business to some people. There was hate mail, calls for impeachment and lawsuits filed when the annual chili cookoff banned the use of meats that had not been USDA inspected.
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